Posts tagged with "World Economic Forum"

People with dyslexia have the skills to future-proof the workforce, research claims

October 15, 2019

Companies can future-proof their workforces by employing people with dyslexia, new research has claimed, according to a report by CNBC.

In a report published Monday, the British consultancy division of Ernst & Young, EY, used data from the World Economic Forum (WEF) and Made By Dyslexia—the latter, a global charity led by successful dyslexics—to outline how such people’s skills aligned with the competencies that would be required in the workplaces of the future.

What exactly is dyslexia? The Mayo Clinic describes it as “a learning disorder that involves difficult reading due to problems identify speech sounds and learning how they relate to letters and words (decoding).” Most dyslexics have above-average intelligence and social aptitude—and, therefore, are able to hide their reading and pronunciation problems without detection in many cases.

Referencing the WEF’s prediction of which skills would be the most in-demand by 2022, EY’s report highlighted how certain capabilities were becoming more and less useful to employers amid the rise of automation.

The need for processing and manual capabilities like time management, reading, mathematical calculations, and active listening were on the decline, according to the report, CNBC notes.

Meanwhile, creative and social skills such as leadership, analytical thinking and technology design—all of which are common in dyslexics—were increasingly in demand.

The report’s authors also highlighted a slew of capabilities and skills typically seen in people with dyslexia that would be vital to all industries by the year 2022.

“Overall, our analysis shows that competencies for a significant number of jobs in the workplace that dyslexic individuals may typically find challenging will largely be impacted by forms of automation,” the report’s authors said.

“In their place, enhanced tasks and new jobs will be created that match closely to the strengths of dyslexic thinking. Dyslexia could provide an opportunity for organizations to bridge the skills gap of the future.”

Earlier this month, CNBC reports, billionaire Sir Richard Branson credited dyslexia for some of his success as an entrepreneur, noting that people with the condition possessed the “skills of the future.”

“My dyslexia has shaped Virgin right from the very beginning and imagination has been the key to many of our successes,” he said in a blog post. “It helped me think big but keep our messages simple. The business world often gets caught up in facts and figures—and while the details and data are important, the ability to dream, conceptualize and innovate is what sets the successful and the unsuccessful apart.”

Research contact: @CNBC

A doomsday plan is hatched in Silicon Valley

September 6, 2018

Years of doomsday talk at Silicon Valley dinner parties has turned to action. Seven Silicon Valley entrepreneurs have purchased huge steel underground bunkers from Texas-based Rising S. within the past couple of years and planted them in New Zealand At the first sign of an apocalypse — nuclear war, a killer germ, a French Revolution-style uprising targeting the 1 percent — the tech giants plan to hop on a private jet and hunker down, according to a September 5 report by Bloomberg.

“New Zealand is an enemy of no one,” Gary Lynch, the manufacturer’s general manager, told Bloomberg in a recent interview from his office in Murchison, southeast of Dallas. “It’s not a nuclear target. It’s not a target for war. It’s a place where people seek refuge.”

The isolated island nation, located 2,500 miles south of Australia, has a population of nearly 5 million (4.8 million) people—and six times as many sheep. It has a reputation for natural beauty and not much else, which makes it the perfect place to disappear. The nation allows emigres to essentially buy residency through investor visas, and rich Americans have poured a fortune into the country, often by acquiring palatial estates.

Indeed, the news outlet reports, the Investor Plus Visa, which requires a minimum investment of NZD$10 million ($6.7 million) over three years, attracted 17 U.S. applicants during fiscal 2017, after President Donald Trump’s election. Previously, it averaged six applicants a year.

Billionaire hedge-fund honcho Julian Robertson owns a lodge overlooking Lake Wakatipu in Queenstown, the South Island’s luxury resort destination. Fidelity National Financial Chairman William P.Foley III has a homestead in the Wairarapa region, north of Wellington, and Hollywood director James Cameron bought a mansion nearby at Lake Pounui.

More than ten Americans from the West Coast have bought multimillion-dollar properties in the Queenstown region in the past two years, said Mark Harris, managing director of the local Sotheby’s real estate office.

“It’s become one of the places for people in Silicon Valley, mostly because it’s not like Silicon Valley at all,” said Reggie Luedtke, an American biomedical engineer who’s moving to New Zealand in October for the Sir Edmund Hillary Fellowship, a program created to lure tech innovators.

Luedtke, 37, told Bloomberg’s Olivia Carville that people in California have asked him if he’s relocating as part of a doomsday contingency plan, because “that’s what the country is known for.”

“It’s known as the last bus stop on the planet before you hit Antarctica,” former Prime Minister John Key told Carville in a phone interview. “I’ve had a lot of people say to me that they would like to own a property in New Zealand if the world goes to hell in a handbasket.”

But now, the remote nation may be pushing back on the sudden influx of anxious Americans. In August, partly in response to Americans gobbling up swaths of prime real estate, New Zealand’s government banned foreigners from buying homes, with the restrictions set to take effect in coming months. Legislators are trying to keep New Zealand real estate affordable for its own population.

Indeed, as early as October 2017, current New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Arden told Bloomberg, “Foreign speculators will no longer be able to buy houses in New Zealand from early next year. We are determined to make it easier for Kiwis to buy their first home, so we are stopping foreign speculators buying houses and driving up prices. Kiwis should not be outbid like this.”

But will those who go underground also be affected? Better to be “sight unseen” is their philosophy.

For their part, the New Zealand locals find this both crazy and amusing, but the former PM thinks that the tech flight might be a good idea: “We live in a world where some people have extraordinary amounts of wealth and there comes a point at which, when you have so much money, allocating a very tiny amount of that for ‘Plan B’ is not as crazy as it sounds.”

Robert Vicino, founder of the Vivos Project, a builder of massive underground bunkers, told Bloomberg that Silicon Valley elites discussed detailed plans to flee to New Zealand last year at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. He said they foresaw “a revolution or a change where society is going to go after the 1 percenters.” In other words, them.

New Zealand isn’t the best solution, he said, because a tsunami caused by an asteroid strike in the Pacific could submerge the island’s highest point. But Vicino is a businessman, and demand dictates he get to work on a bunker on the northern tip of the South Island that would accommodate about 300 people. The price: $35,000 a head.

That’s a bargain compared with the most expensive bunker Lynch’s Rising S has shipped to New Zealand — $8 million, according to Bloomberg.

It takes about two weeks to excavate the land and bury the average bunker. It’s all done very discreetly, so local residents aren’t aware. Once installed, passersby would have no way of knowing it’s there. And that’s just fine with the Americans.

Research contact: @livcarville

President’s counsel averted firing of Mueller last June

January 29, 2018

Although U.S. President Donald Trump stated at a June 9  press conference in the White House Rose Garden that he “would be “100% willing” to testify under oath to Robert Mueller and his team at the Justice Department, that same month, he tried to have the special counsel fired, according to a January 25 report by The New York Times.

Trump is said by the Times story to have gone to White House Counsel Don McGahn with a list of reasons why Mueller’s appointment represented a conflict of interest with the investigation—among them, a dispute over fees at the Trump National Golf Club in Sterling, Virginia; a former relationship with the law firm that now represented the POTUS’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner; and Mueller’s interview for the FBI director position by the White House just the day before he was appointed to helm the DOJ investigation.

With that list in hand, the president demanded that McGahn call Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and order that Mueller be ousted, based on the Times report. McGahn balked at the idea—threatening to quit if the president pressed him on it. According to the Times, Trump then backed off.

In drawing a line, McGahn is said to have headed off a Constitutional crisis. He also supported the will of the American people: More than two-thirds of Americans (68%) think Mueller should be allowed to finish his investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election and attempts by the White House to obstruct justice —and only 14% think he should be fired, a Marist Poll revealed on January 17

When asked about his actions by reporters as he arrived in Davos, Switzerland, for meetings with global political and business leaders attending the World Economic Forum, the President said, “Fake news, folks. A typical New York Times fake story.”

Research contactLee.Miringoff@Marist.edu

Updated version

Melania Trump ditches Davos meeting

January 25, 2018

Just as President John F. Kennedy quipped, ”I am the man who accompanied Jacqueline Kennedy to Paris,” during the couple’s trip abroad in 1961, current President Donald Trump might have commented about FLOTUS Melania Trump at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, this week. However, the First Lady—who is more popular than her husband, according to findings of a poll released on January 20 by CNN—will not be at the conference, her office says, because of “a last-minute change of plans.”

Melania Trump enjoys a 47% favorable rating, while the POTUS’s approval number stands at 40%, according to the CNN poll conducted by SSRS.

Although her office offered her regrets, the First Lady has kept an extremely low profile this month, since news surfaced that her husband’s personal lawyer, Michael Cohen, made a $130,000 payment to ensure the silence of adult actor Stormy Daniels just before the 2016 electionwho nonetheless took the opportunity to talk about several hook-ups with Trump.

According to a story by the UK’s Independent newspaper, “After the story broke, [Melania Trump] accompanied the president to his Mar-a-Lago golf resort in [Palm Beach] Florida, but she did not attend two dinners he hosted—one [for] former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani and and another with House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy.”

On  January 20, the first anniversary of her husband’s inauguration, she shared an image of herself with a military escort before the swearing-in ceremony. The FLOTUS said the past year had been filled with “many wonderful moments” but did not mention President Trump.

Research contact: @KateBennett_DC