Posts tagged with "Washington"

After 24 days, resolute Milwaukee marchers arrive in DC—some with bleeding feet

August 31, 2020

After enduring blistered feet, arrests, harassment, and a spray of gunfire over the course of weeks, a group of dedicated people completed a 750-mile march from Milwaukee to the nation’s capital on  Friday, August 28—the 57th anniversary of Reverand Martin Luther King, Jr.’s  March on Washington, USA Today reported.

Sixty people (plus cats and dogs)—some with bleeding feet and pulled calf muscles—crossed into D.C. around 7:30 a.m. (EDT) Friday morning.

Frank “Nitty” Sensabaugh stood on the National Mall at 9 a.m., exhausted, sore, hungry and in disbelief.  “It’s indescribable,” said Sensabaugh, a Milwaukee-based activist who organized the march. “I was crying for a while. I was tired because I haven’t slept in three days. Then I was crying again.”

Sensabaugh and about 20 other men and women expected to converge with thousands of other protesters—demanding law enforcement reform and voting rights as America reels from the police killings of Black people this year.

At about 1 p.m., participants were planning to march from the Lincoln Memorial to the Martin Luther King, Jr., Memorial for what they are calling the Get Your Knee Off Our Necks Commitment March on Washington.

Now, their demonstration has become even more necessary, Tory Lowe, a Milwaukee-based victims advocate who co-organized the march from Milwaukee, told the national news outlet.

Just miles from Milwaukee last weekend, police in Kenosha, Wisconsin, shot 29-year-old Jacob Blake in the back seven times, leaving the father of three paralyzed from the waist down, according to lawyers for his family. The shooting ignited several nights of looting, violence and protests in Kenosha and other cities across the country—the most recent incidents of unrest this summer amid a nationwide movement for racial justice.

“This march was meant to happen because look what’s happening in the state of Wisconsin,” Lowe said. “This is why we’re marching. It brings validation to the fact of why we ever started this march in the first place.”

The first few days of the journey went smoothly, organizers said, as police escorted the march to and through Chicago. People began to turn out on sidewalks to offer support as the marchers passed by, and others monitoring their progress on social media began to donate food and pay for hotel rooms.

“Once we got into Indiana and Ohio, it got really intense because the areas with less diversity became our biggest issues,” Lowe told USA Today.. “Some people were saying {we should] go home. People would write things on the ground. They were pissed.”

On the ninth day, Indiana State Police arrested and held Sensabaugh and Lowe for several hours near Warsaw because, police said, the group was blocking traffic.

“We’ve been arrested for walking, and we’ve been shot at,” Lowe said. “A white male just came out of nowhere, and our security was shot.”

As the march moved through western Pennsylvania on Monday night, the group of about 30 stopped in the parking lot of a private business and gunfire broke out, according to state police. “The property owners confronted the activists. The confrontation escalated, and gunshots were exchanged between the property owners and the activists,” Pennsylvania State Police Trooper Brett Miller said Tuesday.

The Bedford County District Attorney was investigating the incident, and no charges had been filed, Miller said.

As the marchers left Pennsylvania on Wednesday night, a group of residents – some armed – lined the streets and yelled slurs, Lowe said. At the same time, other residents came out to protect the marchers, he said.

“It’s been a spiritual journey, and it’s an eye-opening journey for many of us because we’re seeing outright racism as we walk,” Lowe said. “It’s been 24 days, and every day is something. Not one day have we been out here and someone hasn’t thrown racial slurs.”

Sensabaugh and Lowe said they’ve also been heartened by the outpouring of support for the march. At one point in Indiana, a group of diverse group of residents brought the marchers two week’s worth of supplies, water and shoes. Some nurses volunteered to look at their feet.

“It was amazing, and the spirit of humanity was alive,” Lowe said. “There are some people working to change things in these communities as well.”

“There’s a lot of joy, happiness, and relief,” Sensabaugh said. “Between being tired and overwhelmed with emotions, I’m at a loss for words for the first time in my life. I’m trying to soak it all in.”

Sensabaugh said he and other marchers were expected to speak on the Mall and participate in events throughout the day.

Research contact: @USATODAY

Pelosi to participate in CNN Town Hall as House weighs impeachment

November 25, 2019

When Nancy Pelosi speaks, the American people and their president listen.  The House Speaker is widely recognized as one of the strongest and smartest leaders inside the Beltway—and as the savvy architect of the current impeachment inquiry.

Now CNN has announced, Pelosi will participate in a town hall broadcast from Washington, D.C., moderated by Jake Tapper at 9 p.m. (ET) on December 5. As part of the CNN format, the House Speaker will take questions directly from a cross-section of voters.

According to the cable news network’s publicity for the event, “Pelosi has been critical of Trump’s presidency — from his policy initiatives to his personal conduct as commander-in-chief. Earlier this week, the Speaker told CBS that she warned Trump to refrain from intimidating the “whistleblower”—whose complaint about the President’s call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky prompted the impeachment inquiry.”

While impeachment proceedings will dominate the headlines in December, Congress will be facing a deadline on funding for the federal government, and mounting pressure to pass a massive trade deal; and to approve legislation to lower the costs of prescription drugs.

The town hall will air exclusively on CNN, CNN International, CNN en Español, CNN.com’s homepage, across mobile devices via CNN’s apps for iOS and Android, via CNNgo apps for Apple TV, Roku, Amazon Fire, Chromecast and Android TV, SiriusXM Channels 116, 454, 795 and the Westwood One Radio Network.

Research contact: @CNN

Starbucks Delivers expands to more U.S. cities, powered by Uber Eats

January 23, 2019

After a successful pilot test in Miami, on January 22, Starbucks announced the expansion of its delivery service to another six cities nationwide.

The rollout, in partnership with Uber Eats, began on Tuesday in San Francisco—and the company says that it “remains on track to bring Starbucks Delivers to nearly one-quarter of [our] U.S. company-operated stores, “ with planned expansion to select stores in Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, New York and Washington, D.C., in the coming weeks.

According to the Seattle-based coffee chain, the Miami test, also powered by Uber Eats, saw “strong demand, including repeat business throughout the day and positive feedback from customers.”

What’s more, Starbucks Delivers will launch a new pilot later this month in London—its first in Europe, also powered by Uber Eats—following other overseas delivery initiatives in China, Japan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Indonesia, Vietnam, Mexico, Columbia, and Chile.

The company plans on tapping into a global $95 billion online food delivery market. partnership Starbucks will leverage Uber’s expertise as one of the fastest-growing meal delivery services in the United States—reaching Uber’s current customers, as well as offering the existing Starbucks clientele a new method for including the chain’s beverages in their daily routines.

“We know we have untapped customer demand for Starbucks Delivers in the United States and, starting today, we’re expanding our best-in-class experience to our customers both in and out of our stores,” said Roz Brewer, group president and chief operating officer for Starbucks. “We’re building on key learnings from past delivery pilots and by integrating our ordering technology directly with Uber Eats, we’ve unlocked the ability to bring Starbucks to customers for those times when they’re not able to come to us.”

Customers will be able to access Starbucks Delivers through the Uber Eats mobile app, available on iOS and Android devices. With approximately 95% of core menu items available directly from the Starbucks menu, customers will be able to customize their orders just as they would when ordering on Starbucks mobile apps. Delivery orders will come with an initial $2.49 booking fee.

“At Uber Eats, we’re always looking for new ways to offer people the widest selection of food they love. That’s why we’re so excited to deliver Starbucks fans their favorite food and beverages in a way that’s as easy as requesting a ride,” said Jason Droege, VP and head of UberEverything. “Be it breakfast delivered straight to the soccer field or afternoon lattés to the office, we know this partnership will delight our customers.”

Starbucks Delivers represents the next evolution of the company’s approach to delivery and expanding its digital relationships with customers. In addition to the pilot in Miami and a pilot in the Empire State Building, Starbucks previously tested delivery in Seattle in 2015 for members of the company’s Starbucks Rewards loyalty program.

Starbucks Delivers was first announced in August 2018 in China through a partnership with Alibaba and on-demand food delivery service Ele.me. By the end of 2018, delivery services had expanded to 2,000 stores across 30 cities in China, while also being introduced to select stores in Tokyo and Miami.

Research contact: #starbucksdelivery

Allbirds perches in New York City and plans more stores nationwide

September 5, 2018

The newest product to come out of Silicon Valley needs no tech support—but it’s supporting the feet of such well-known techies as Google Co-founder Larry Page, former Twitter chief Dick Costolo, and venture capitalists Ben Horowitz and Mary Meeker, according to a September 4 report by CNBC.

Called Allbirds, the new brand of footwear—produced with such sustainable resources as merino wool, tree fibers, and sugar— already has won over customers on the West Coast and is expanding fast. The company opened its first store on the East Coast, in New York City, just after Labor Day.

At more than 4,800 square feet, the new flagship location in New York’s SoHo neighborhood on Spring Street will include a “service bar” to help buyers find the right size, along with room for customers to lounge. It will replace its temporary home on Prince Street, which was about 900 square feet and is closing later this week.

Like the wildly popular Warby Parker (eyeglasses), Casper (mattresses), and  Everlane (clothing), Allbirds began business as an etailer.

The company only recently began opening stores, serving as a place for shoppers to try on the sneakers before buying and helping create more buzz around the brand. The company has since launched a new sneaker made out of tree fibers and flip-flops made out of sugar, along with a kids’ line called Smallbirds.

Indeed, the brand has become so buzzworthy that, last month, actor and environmentalist Leonardo DiCaprio became an investor, People magazine reported.

Creating sustainable consumer products requires a deep commitment from brands that understand the role they have in helping solve our environmental crisis,” DiCaprio said in an exclusive statement. “Allbirds is on the forefront of developing new materials that will serve as a model for the footwear industry. This kind of innovation is crucial for creating a more sustainable future. I am proud to join the company as an investor.”

“Given how tactile our product and brand story is, it’s important that we continue to create these opportunities to interact with customers,” Allbirds Co-founder Joey Zwillinger said. “Our goal is to continue to create retail spaces that allow customers to truly engage with the brand in an authentic off-line experience that embodies Allbirds’ unique comfort and thoughtful design.”

Allbirds plans to open eight more stores in the United States in locations including Chicago, Boston, Los Angeles,  and Washington, D.C. The company also said it’s thinking about adding two locations overseas.

“There is and has been incredible pent-up demand for Allbirds around the world,” Zwillinger told CNBC. “When we launched the brand, we were thoughtful to keep our distribution limited to the regions we felt we could service impeccably — the United States  and New Zealand, our home countries.”

Since then, Allbirds has grown into Australia and Canada.

Research contact: lauren.thomas@nbcuni.com