Posts tagged with "Vogue Magazine"

The toast of the town: A Japanese artist makes delectable art during lockdown

September 22, 2020

During quarantine, many of us picked up a new hobby—baking bread, putting together jigsaw puzzles, painting by numbers. But it’s Japanese artist Manami Sasaki who found the ultimate distraction du jour: toast art.

In her Tokyo kitchen, Sasaki concocted chic culinary creations on a carb canvas—think homages to Picasso and Mondrian, recreations of Japanese Edo-period (1603-1868) paintings, abstract nods to Mickey Mouse, and even an edible take on American comic book art. Then, she posted the stylized results on her Instargam account, @sasamana1204.

“The reason I started doing toast art was lockdown. I was spending an hour and a half commuting to work, but working from home led me to wake up late and get lazy,” Sasaki told Vogue Magazine recently. “I wanted to get up early in the morning and create a morning routine that would excite me. That’s when I started the toast art for breakfast.”

Why toast? “I’ve eaten bread every day since I was born, so expressing it on toast was a natural progression,” Sasaki says. She saw an opportunity to both show off not only her talent, but also that of other Japanese creators—in a way that everyone would connect with. “Most of the su

Art source: #sasamana1204/Instagram

bjects I’ve painted on bread have been from Japanese culture. Since 80% of my Instagram followers are international, I’m motivated to introduce Japanese culture and artists. So I use bread and text to show off the appeal of the subject matter.”

Each piece, Sasaki says, takes around three hours to make from start to finish. After deciding on a concept, she walks to her local supermarket to shop for ingredients. She’s cognizant of which materials change color and shape when applied to heat (an important factor to consider when a toaster is involved). Recently, she used prosciutto to represent the orange slickness of a goldfish, and purple cabbage to illustrate the regal feel of a kimono; blueberries served as a centerpiece of a summer flower.

And lest you think this is merely an aesthetic exercise, Sasaki makes sure each work tastes delicious. That aforementioned flower toast? In addition to blueberries, it was made of sesame cream, sour cream, and chervil, topped off with honey drizzle. If she doesn’t think through her concept, she notes, “My breakfast time will be a disappointment. I’m determined to avoid it!”

Research contact: @voguemagazine

A 13-year-old boy delivers his speech with a stutter—and elevates DNC to an emotional high

August 24, 2020

Twenty seconds into his speech on August 20, Brayden Harrington struggled to say his next word, as he undoubtedly knew he would. There was a long pause before the 13-year-old was able to triumphantly say that word: “Stutter.”

It was one of the most moving moments of the night, Vogue reported—and perhaps of the entire Democratic National Convention: a young boy speaking to a national audience about his disability and the 77-year-old man who, drawing on his own experience, was trying to help him overcome it.

Introduced by Julia Louis-Dreyfus, the evening’s celebrity emcee, Harrington, dressed in a dusky orange tee-shirt and reading his speech on a white sheet of paper he held with both hands, opened by saying, “My name is Brayden Harrington, and I am 13 years old. And without Joe Biden, I wouldn’t be talking to you today.”

He continued, “About a few months ago, I met him in New Hampshire. He told me that we were members of the same club: We”—and then came the long pause before he completed the sentence—“stutter. It was really amazing to hear that someone like me became [the] vice president. He told me about a book of poems by Yeats he would read out loud to practice. He showed me how he marks his addresses to make them easier to say out loud. So I did the same thing today.

“My family often says, ‘When the world feels better,’ before talking about something normal, like going to the movies. We all want the world to feel better. We need the world to feel better. I’m just a regular kid, and in a short amount of time, Joe Biden made me more confident about something that’s bothered me my whole life. Joe Biden cared.

“Imagine what he could do for all of us. Kids like me are counting on you to elect someone we can all look up to, someone who cares, someone who will make our country and the world feel better. We’re counting on you to elect Joe Biden.”

Harrington and Biden had met in February at a campaign event in New Hampshire. After they first spoke on the rope line, the former vice president invited Harrington backstage to continue their conversation and told him about how he had worked to overcome his own stutter.

Biden’s own stutter emerged when he was a child, he told The Atlantic earlier this year. At times, he was tormented for it. He recalled one nun at school calling him “Mr. Buh-Buh-Buh-Biden” and demanding that he repeat a passage from a book, and high-school classmates nicknaming him “Dash”—as in Morse code staccato.

According to the Vogue report, Harrington’s was a stunning opening to a night that would later see Joe Biden accept his party’s nomination for the presidency, and based on the reaction on social media, there were few dry eyes on viewers at home. (According to The Washington Post, a video of Harrington’s address that was shared on Twitter by the Democratic National Convention had been viewed more than 3 million times by Friday morning.)

“I want to say this to Brayden Harrington (the precious young man with a stutter): Young, Sir: You humble me. I am in TOTAL AWE of your courage,” tweeted Pam Keith, the former Navy JAG running for Congress from Florida’s 18th District. “You have a titanic spirit and unshakeable will. You made the worst bully look pathetic, ridiculous, and so very small. I salute you.”

On MSNBC, Claire McCaskill, the former U.S. senator from Missouri, contrasted Biden’s empathetic outreach to this young boy—and then giving him a high-profile speaking slot at the party’s national convention—with Donald Trump’s widely reported mocking of a disabled New York Times reporter during the 2016 campaign. She said his speech might have been, “the most important moment of the night.” (That same point was also made in a tweet by Matthew Miller, a former spokesman for the State Department: “As I watched Brayden Harrington talk about Biden helping him with his stutter, could not stop thinking of the clip of Trump mocking a disabled reporter. What a contrast.”)

And CNN’s Chris Cillizza said, “Holy cow. The Brayden Harrington speech. The courage. My god. I am going to remember that one for a long time.”

But perhaps the most moving tribute came from a woman who herself has struggled to recapture the power of speech. “Speaking is hard for me too, Brayden,” tweeted Gabby Giffords, the former Arizona congresswoman who was almost killed during a mass shooting in 2011 and is still recovering from those near-fatal injuries. “But as you know, practice and purpose help. Thank you for your courage and for the great speech!”

Research contact: @voguemagazine

Give me some skin! This family-owned bandage company was founded for people of color

August 19, 2020

Just as “flesh-colored” crayons are politically incorrect; so too are flesh-colored bandages—which, for nearly as long as we can remember, have been available stores in strictly “neutral” colors, ignoring the reality of multicultural skin tones.

The crayons were phased out by Crayola in 1962 and replaced with a “peach” color; then updated again this June with a Colors of the World product that offers a variety of shades—from deepest almond, to medium golden, to light rose, and all the dark and light shades in between.

What’s more, just as Black Lives Matter took hold nationwide—and after 100 years in business—Band-Aid also finally expanded its shade range this June. About time, most commenters said, while others were quick to point out that other companies already had emerged to fill the gap namely Tru Colour, and Browndages, Vogue Magazine reports.

 

Browndages was founded in 2018 when Intisar Mahdi and her husband, Rashid, were inspired to provide a better experience for their family. “The bandages we were buying did not match the flesh of our family,” Intisar told Vogue from their home in Columbus, Ohio, “so we thought to create our own company.”

Also drawing from personal experience, Browndages has developed a line of more whimsical bandages for kids. The couple noticed that their three children—now ages 5, 8, and 10—were very interested in wearing colorful bandages that had princesses and superheroes on them. “But none of those images that we’d purchase looked like them,” Intisar says. Secondly, “they couldn’t really grow up to be a princess.”

Above, a box of the new Browndages. (Photo source: King Day Productions)

As an alternative, the Mahdis had the UK-based artist Princess Karibo draw images in the likeness of their own children, illustrating them as aspiring veterinarians, chefs, astronauts, ballerinas, and more. “We wanted to show them what they could actually attain,” Intisar told Vogue.

 

After seeing themselves depicted in this way, their oldest and youngest daughters expressed interest in the culinary arts and veterinarian field, respectively. “It’s amazing to see how that representation can expand a child’s mind. They start to believe, ‘I can do this too’,” Intisar says.

The Mahdis currently work full-time jobs while running Browndages—Intisar in IT Management, and Rashid in logistics. They’ve divided up their tasks accordingly: Intisar focuses on the customer service aspects of the job, answering emails; while Rashid focuses on fulfilling orders; sometimes enlisting the help of family friends.

Recently, the brand earned the attention of Instagram after actress Lupita Nyong’o posted herself with a Browndage on her knee. “Finally, a bandage that blends!“ Nyong’o exclaimed in the caption.. “Thank you, Browndages for helping me conceal my clumsiness.”

Intisar is still on a high from the post. “It felt really good to be seen by someone on her level,” she says. “It gave us exposure in places that we may not have reached otherwise.”

That attention, along with the imperative to support Black-owned businesses, has led Browndages to sell out of all their bandages, though they’re working to restock the products this year, along with a new offering: a full first-aid kit.

Research contact: @voguemagazine