Posts tagged with "USA Today"

After 24 days, resolute Milwaukee marchers arrive in DC—some with bleeding feet

August 31, 2020

After enduring blistered feet, arrests, harassment, and a spray of gunfire over the course of weeks, a group of dedicated people completed a 750-mile march from Milwaukee to the nation’s capital on  Friday, August 28—the 57th anniversary of Reverand Martin Luther King, Jr.’s  March on Washington, USA Today reported.

Sixty people (plus cats and dogs)—some with bleeding feet and pulled calf muscles—crossed into D.C. around 7:30 a.m. (EDT) Friday morning.

Frank “Nitty” Sensabaugh stood on the National Mall at 9 a.m., exhausted, sore, hungry and in disbelief.  “It’s indescribable,” said Sensabaugh, a Milwaukee-based activist who organized the march. “I was crying for a while. I was tired because I haven’t slept in three days. Then I was crying again.”

Sensabaugh and about 20 other men and women expected to converge with thousands of other protesters—demanding law enforcement reform and voting rights as America reels from the police killings of Black people this year.

At about 1 p.m., participants were planning to march from the Lincoln Memorial to the Martin Luther King, Jr., Memorial for what they are calling the Get Your Knee Off Our Necks Commitment March on Washington.

Now, their demonstration has become even more necessary, Tory Lowe, a Milwaukee-based victims advocate who co-organized the march from Milwaukee, told the national news outlet.

Just miles from Milwaukee last weekend, police in Kenosha, Wisconsin, shot 29-year-old Jacob Blake in the back seven times, leaving the father of three paralyzed from the waist down, according to lawyers for his family. The shooting ignited several nights of looting, violence and protests in Kenosha and other cities across the country—the most recent incidents of unrest this summer amid a nationwide movement for racial justice.

“This march was meant to happen because look what’s happening in the state of Wisconsin,” Lowe said. “This is why we’re marching. It brings validation to the fact of why we ever started this march in the first place.”

The first few days of the journey went smoothly, organizers said, as police escorted the march to and through Chicago. People began to turn out on sidewalks to offer support as the marchers passed by, and others monitoring their progress on social media began to donate food and pay for hotel rooms.

“Once we got into Indiana and Ohio, it got really intense because the areas with less diversity became our biggest issues,” Lowe told USA Today.. “Some people were saying {we should] go home. People would write things on the ground. They were pissed.”

On the ninth day, Indiana State Police arrested and held Sensabaugh and Lowe for several hours near Warsaw because, police said, the group was blocking traffic.

“We’ve been arrested for walking, and we’ve been shot at,” Lowe said. “A white male just came out of nowhere, and our security was shot.”

As the march moved through western Pennsylvania on Monday night, the group of about 30 stopped in the parking lot of a private business and gunfire broke out, according to state police. “The property owners confronted the activists. The confrontation escalated, and gunshots were exchanged between the property owners and the activists,” Pennsylvania State Police Trooper Brett Miller said Tuesday.

The Bedford County District Attorney was investigating the incident, and no charges had been filed, Miller said.

As the marchers left Pennsylvania on Wednesday night, a group of residents – some armed – lined the streets and yelled slurs, Lowe said. At the same time, other residents came out to protect the marchers, he said.

“It’s been a spiritual journey, and it’s an eye-opening journey for many of us because we’re seeing outright racism as we walk,” Lowe said. “It’s been 24 days, and every day is something. Not one day have we been out here and someone hasn’t thrown racial slurs.”

Sensabaugh and Lowe said they’ve also been heartened by the outpouring of support for the march. At one point in Indiana, a group of diverse group of residents brought the marchers two week’s worth of supplies, water and shoes. Some nurses volunteered to look at their feet.

“It was amazing, and the spirit of humanity was alive,” Lowe said. “There are some people working to change things in these communities as well.”

“There’s a lot of joy, happiness, and relief,” Sensabaugh said. “Between being tired and overwhelmed with emotions, I’m at a loss for words for the first time in my life. I’m trying to soak it all in.”

Sensabaugh said he and other marchers were expected to speak on the Mall and participate in events throughout the day.

Research contact: @USATODAY

‘Got milk?’ A popular ad campaign returns, with some changes

August 20, 2020

Consumers across the country are once again being asked a very important question: “Got milk?” Yes, the iconic advertising tagline is back, but not in the same way.

On August 3, the dairy industry, led by MilkPEP, relaunched the iconic advertising campaign. This revamped spots are targeted toward a new generation of viewers—with content that is optimistic and filled with energy, designed to connect with families and kids and is driven by real people and behaviors.

Specifically, the American Dairy Association says, “The refreshed ‘got milk?’ campaign has been adapted to reflect how families—and, more specifically, kids—consume media. Social media influencers are highlighted instead of celebrities to drive awareness of the campaign.”

To kick off the challenge, six-time Olympic Gold Medalist Katie Ledecky posted a video of herself swimming a lap in a pool with a glass of milk on her head without spilling it. The incredible video went viral and now consumers and other past and present winning swimmers—including Mark Spitz, who took seven golds home from the 1972 Munich Games— are showing off their “something amazing” while not spilling their milk. Ledecky’s video also went viral in the media, with already 1,600 media placements (and counting!), including mentions on ESPNYahoo!USA Today and many other national and local media outlets.

Indeed, during the first week, which started August 7, all the videos with #gotmilkchallenge have been viewed more than 2.3 billion (yes, billion) times! 

On social media platforms, including ADA North East’s, consumers are encouraged to follow Ladecky’s lead by recording a short video pouring a glass of milk and then “doing something amazing” without spilling the milk. Consumers are then encouraged to post the video to social media at #gotmilkchallenge.

The ADA North East marketing team is working closely with MilkPEP to amplify the new “got milk?” campaign. The team at ADA has launched a contest for consumers in the Northeast to post their #gotmilkchallenge video to social media where users add a second hashtag – #milkmovesme. Each post will be entered for a chance to win fun prizes. 

Research contact: @AmericanDairyNE

Elon Musk says goat-mimicking horn sounds are ‘definitely coming’ to Tesla fleet

August 18, 2020

If you happen to hear the sound of a bleating goat while you are out on the road, it might just be a Tesla electric vehicle, reports USA Today.

In 2019, the automaker’s outrageous and brilliant CEO Elon Musk tweeted that new horn features were in the works such as goat noises and fart sounds. (Without such features, electric vehicles are largely silent, unlike internal combustion engines,)

 “And that’s just the tip of the iceberg,” he said last October. However, the company hadn’t mentioned the update since then. 

However, on Friday, August 14, a follower on Twitter asked Musk if the horn development was still underway, and Musk confirmed that newer versions of the electric cars will make bleating noises to alert the car up ahead, USA Today says.

“Will only be on relatively recent cars, as we didn’t have an outside speaker until about a year ago. Can change inside sound easily,” Musk said.

USA Today reached out to Tesla for more information. The reason? It’s unclear what type of timeline Musk has in mind. Tesla electric vehicles receive new features periodically via over-the-air updates, similar to smartphones. What’s more, the news outlet notes, It’s important to also remember that the CEO has previously made unconfirmed promises on Twitter that have landed him in hot water. 

In 2018, Musk tweeted that he lined up the financing necessary to take Tesla private in a buyout. The buyout never happened and the Securities and Exchange Commission accused Musk of misleading investors.

Musk and Tesla eventually reached a $40 million settlement and the CEO stepped down as chairman for at least three years. There was also a stipulation that his tweets be prescreened by the company for accuracy.

Posting on social media got Musk into trouble again in 2019 after he tweeted about Tesla’s projected production numbers. The SEC alleged the tweet was another misleading statement, and the situation resulted in another settlement.

Research contact: @USATODAY

For the discerning snacker: Cheez-Its packaged with a rosé wine

July 22, 2020

Battle Creek, Michigan-based Kelloggs and House Wine of Walla Walla, Washington, have a little something special for those of us (maybe, all of us?) who admit to snacking more while under lockdown, reports USA Today..

They have teamed up for the second year running to offer a $29.99 box containing both a three-liter box of rosé House Wine and about 20 servings of Cheez-It White Cheddar crackers. This combo-pack goes on sale 2 p.m. (ET) this Thursday, ahead of National Wine and Cheese Day on Saturday, July 25, at OriginalHouseWine.com.

And if you want a box, you had better move fast, the companies say; because last year, the pairing sold out in minutes.

“White Cheddar is a long-standing favorite of Cheez-It fans and what better match than light, refreshing rosé?” Cheez-It Senior Marketing Director Jeff Delonis said in a statement. “Not only does it perfectly complement the cheesy goodness, it’s also the unofficial wine of summer!”

“We’ve seen rosé skyrocket in popularity over the past few years, especially during the warm summer season,” said Hal Landvoigt, winemaker for House Wine, in a statement. “For the second year of this partnership, we knew the pairing had to feature rosé as the perfect complement to the real-cheese flavor in Cheez-It White Cheddar.”

For those who miss out on the special offer–—Kellogg’s has some suggestions:

  • Extra Cheesy Cheez-Its with pinot grigio,
  • Cheddar Jack Cheez-Its with cabernet sauvignon, and
  • Cheez-It Duoz Sharp Cheddar/Parmesan with chardonnay.

Those recommendations may come in handy, too, if you want to experiment with Cheez-Its and wine for National Wine and Cheese Day, USA Today notes. That’s because your Cheez-It and House Wine package isn’t guaranteed for delivery by Saturday.

Research contact: @USATODAY

Court sides with publisher; Simon & Schuster to release Mary Trump’s tell-all book on July 14

July 7, 2020

Mary Trump’s revelatory book on the Trump family—announced on Monday, July 6 that it would move up its publication date to July 14 due to “high demand and extraordinary interest.”

The president’s niece, who has been embroiled in a legal battle over the book with her uncles, including the president’s brother Robert Trump, issued an email statement to USA Today through her spokesperson, Chris Bastardi.

“The act by a sitting president to muzzle a private citizen is just the latest in a series of disturbing behaviors which have already destabilized a fractured nation in the face of a global pandemic,” the statement said. “If Mary cannot comment, one can only help but wonder: what is Donald Trump so afraid of?”

The book, “Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man,” originally was scheduled to be published by Simon & Schuster on July 28.

A New York appellate court last week ruled the publication could go ahead over the Trump brothers’ attempts to block it.

But a temporary restraining order remains on Mary herself. A lower court judge in New York is due to consider whether to continue or drop that order later this week, USA Today said.

Mary, 55, a psychologist, is the daughter of Trump’s elder brother, the late Fred Trump Jr.

Her book is described by the publisher as  an “authoritative portrait of Donald J. Trump and the toxic family that made him.” She shines a light on the “dark history of their family in order to explain how her uncle became the man who now threatens the world’s health, economic security, and social fabric,” according to the publisher’s description.

Bastardi said Mary will have no further comment at this time. But her statement suggests that the legal furor surrounding her book is further evidence of the problematic behavior in her family she alleges and seeks to illuminate in her book, which left the Trump brothers outraged.

Research contact: @USATODAY

Trump offers dubious conspiracy theory about elderly protester shoved off his feet by Buffalo cops

June 10, 2020

President Donald Trump advanced an unsubstantiated conspiracy theory on Tuesday, June 9, about the 75-year-old protester in Buffalo who suffered head injuries after he was pushed to the ground by police and hit his head on the sidewalk, USA Today reports.

“75 year old Martin Gugino was pushed away after appearing to scan police communications in order to black out the equipment,” Trump said in a morning tweet.

Citing a report on conservative news network OANN, Trump said: “I watched, he fell harder than was pushed. Was aiming scanner. Could be a set up?” He also said Gugino “could be” an anarchist “provocateur,” but provided no evidence for that assertion.

Two suspended Buffalo police officers have been charged with assault and accused of intentionally pushing Gugino, who was seen bleeding from the back of the head after he hit the sidewalk.

Gugino, described by a friends as a man of peace seeking justice, was in serious but stable condition following the incident on Thursday.

Kelly Zarcone, Gugino’s attorney, told The Washington Post on Tuesday that Gugino has always been a peaceful protester who loves his family, and “no one from law enforcement has suggested otherwise.

“So we’re at a loss to understand why the president of the United States would make such a dark, dangerous and untrue accusation against him,” she added.

Critics expressed outrage over Trump’s tweet.

Trump sent the tweet just hours before the funeral of George Floyd, the man whose death at the hands of Minneapolis police triggered protests nationwide, including massive demonstrations in cities like Washington, D.C., and Buffalo.

Research contact: @USATODAY

There’s one hairstyle that’s all the buzz during the pandemic

April 27, 2020

Forget about cutting bangs. Now that they have been cut adrift from their beloved stylists during the pandemic, many Americans are taking more drastic measures to avoid several months of bad hair days.

Take, for example, Macy Leonard of Sherrystown, Pennsylvania, who usually likes her hair to be easily manageable and dyes it “funky fun” colors so frequently that she jokes she doesn’t remember her natural color anymore, according to a report by USA Today.

“I shaved away the ‘old me’ and welcomed this new version of me, the version that quarantine was teaching me to be,” she told the nationwide news outlet. “I felt empowered. I felt determined to stick to my guns and do what I said I was going to do.”

Leonard’s not alone. Searches for “buzz cut,” according to Google Trends, have skyrocketed in recent months, reaching an all-time high in the United States and worldwide.

“The one thing that people don’t want to let go of,” James Axl, head stylist at Canale Salon in Beverly Hills, California, told USA Today, “is themselves.”

Fortunately, Axl, who’s worked as a stylist for 24 years, says the process of doing an at-home buzz cut is “as easy as you think.” “A lot of people are so intimidated,” he said of people buzzing their own hair for the first time. “When the guard is on [the clipper], you can’t mess up — it’s bowling with bumpers. Once that’s on there, as long as it doesn’t pop off, it’s great.”

No matter how short you plan on going, Axl has some basic ground rules for how to buzz cut your own hair. Never start at the front of your head, he advises. In case you change your mind at the very last second, you don’t want to be stuck with a shaved-off spot in the front.

“Start behind the ear and see how short that short is really gonna be,” he said, “especially if someone’s hair is a little bit longer.”

Begin with a larger clipping guard and shave all around your head, said Axl. “That way, you know that it’s already cut the longest you want everywhere.”

Then, to tailor it up, switch to a shorter clipping guard—but make sure it’s not more than two sizes smaller. That may make the blending process more difficult.

“Start at the nape of the neck, but not following the round of the head, and use your neck as a ski slope and go up the occipital bone — where the head meets the beck of your neck,” he told USA Today. “That’s when you want to start sloping out and moving up and out and that will create a more gradual shave.”

Axl suggests practicing the up-and-out motion to ensure the cleanest shave. He also suggests having someone hold a mirror behind you.

But even if it’s not the perfect cut, Axl can relate. “Even I myself got a little screwed up and this is what I do for a living!” he said of a recent trim he gave himself. “If someone doesn’t do this for a living, that’s OK.”

If you’re afraid to bite the bullet, Leonard suggests just taking the risk.

“If the thought of shaving your head has crossed your mind, just do it!” she said. “Hair grows back. If you hate it, wigs are a thing!”

Research contact: @USATODAY

Move over, Airbnb: New home rental platform Golightly caters just to women

January 29, 2020

Traveling alone as a woman, or even in a group of women, shouldn’t be intimidating or dangerous—but it can be. Enter Golightly, a vacation rental platform exclusively for females, which launched this month.

All of the properties are owned or managed by women, and renters must be women, although men can travel with the, USA Today reports.

Victoria O’Connell launched the Austin, Texas-based company after she had  a bad experience renting out her own home in London—which was burglarized and destroyed by a group of men.

“I felt that I would never be comfortable renting out my home again, and I wanted to figure out a way to change that and feel safe again,” O’Connell told USA Today.  “I travel frequently and also stay in vacation rentals often, so I had to find a way to get back to it.”

The rental platform is invite-only and aims to build a community of women. Each member is given five invites to send to other women. But if women want to join and don’t have a referral code, they can fill in an online form to be vetted.

According to the website, “As a private club, Golightly carefully vets each member and property listing. Our goal is to provide a safer and more secure travel experience. Listings and member profiles are only available within the Golightly network to protect the privacy of our community.”

It costs $100 for a lifetime membership, but, the news outlet notes, that fee is being waived through the end of February as the platform aims to grow its membership and add more properties. There’s a 10% transaction fee for guests and a 5% fee for hosts on bookings.

For now the site has hundreds of home rentals, with the majority of them concentrated in the United States and Europe.

Research contact: @USATODAY

‘A distinctly American phenomenon’: Our workers die younger than those in other wealthy nations

November 27, 2019

Americans work hard and die young, according to findings of a study conducted at Virginia Commonwealth University.  In fact, the engine that powers the world’s most potent economy is succumbing at an alarming pace—a “distinctly American phenomenon’’ with no easily discernible cause or simple solution, USA Today reported on November 26.

Specifically, researchers determined that mortality rates for U.S. adults ages 25-64 continue to increase—driving down the general population’s life expectancy for the three consecutive years following 2014.

The report, Life Expectancy and Mortality Rates in the United States, 1959-2017,’’ was published on November 26  in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

According to USA Today, it paints a bleak picture of a workforce plagued by drug overdoses, suicides, and organ-system diseases while grappling with economic stresses.

“This looks like an excellent paper—just what we needed to help unravel the overall decline in life expectancy in the United States’’ said Eileen Crimmins, the AARP Professor of Gerontology at the University of California-Leonard Davis. She’s who’s an expert on the link between health and socioeconomic factors.

In a trend that cuts across racial and ethnic boundaries, America has the worst midlife mortality rate among 17 high-income countries despite leading the world in per-capita spending on health care.

And while life expectancy in those other industrialized nations continues to inch up, ours has been going in the opposite direction—decreasing from a peak of 78.9 years in 2014 to 78.6 in 2017, the last year covered by the report.

By comparison, the news outlet reports, according to the Peterson-Kaiser Health System Tracker, the average longevity in similar countries is 82.2 years. Japan’s is 84.1; France’s, 82.4;and Canada’s, 81.9. They left the United States behind in the 1980s and increased the distance as the rate of progress in this country diminished and eventually halted in 2011.

Steven Woolf, director emeritus of the Virginia Commonwealth University Center on Society and Health and the study’s lead author, said the reasons for the decline go well beyond the lack of universal health care in America—in contrast with those other nations—although that’s a factor.

“It would be easier if we could blame this whole trend on one problem, like guns or obesity, or the opioid epidemic—all of which distinguish [the U.S.] from the other countries,’’ Woolf told USA Today. “But we found increases in death rates across 35 causes of death.’’

They were most pronounced in the industrial Midwest, the 13 Appalachian states, and upper New England, which Woolf attributed partly to the decline in manufacturing jobs and the opioid epidemic.

Of the top 10 states with the highest number of excess deaths in the 25-64 age range —meaning deaths above projections based on U.S. mortality rates—eight were in the Rust Belt or Appalachia. Half of the excess deaths were concentrated in the latter region. The Ohio Valley—comprising Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, and Pennsylvania—accounted for one-third.

“Not only are employers more likely to see premature deaths in their workers, but also greater illness rates and greater disability, and that puts U.S. businesses at a disadvantage against businesses in other countries that have a healthier and more productive workforce,’’ Woolf said, adding that employers here are already saddled with high health care costs.

The report showed mortality rates among those younger than 25 and older than 64 have decreased. That might point a finger at the country’s dysfunctional health care system for working adults, because many in those other age groups can be covered by either the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) or Medicare.

Woolf told USA Today that he disputes that notion, saying only 10% to 20% of health outcomes can be attributed to medical care. He said the bigger culprit is a lack of social programs and support systems more common in other wealthy countries for when working families run into difficult times.

Those rough spells, often associated with a job loss, can lead to the kind of unhealthy behaviors – drug and alcohol abuse, smoking, overeating, suicide attempts—that result in what have become known as “deaths of despair.’’

“We’re making a huge mistake if we don’t step back and look at the root causes,’’ Woolf told the news oulet—ncluding a lack of educational opportunities and living wages among the likely causes. “The prescription for the country is we’ve got to help these people. And if we don’t, we’re literally going to pay with our lives.’’

Research contact: @USATODAY

Facebook gets grief for including Breitbart in News tab

October 29, 2019

Can Facebook do anything that doesn’t draw fire from users, regulators, legislators, and the media? After years of complaints from American news outlets that the social media site has The Washington Post reports that Facebook has agreed to compensate at least some news organizations as part of a specialized “News” tab meant to steer users toward curated national and local news stories.

But the project immediately raised new controversy when it became known that Breitbart News—a Web outlet linked to right-wing causes that was once run by former Trump adviser Steve Bannonhad been included among the 200 media outlets participating in the program.

“Given that Facebook is putting actual news outlets in the same category as Breitbart, actual news outlets should consider quickly withdrawing from the program,” Angelo Carusone, the president of Media Matters for America, a liberal nonprofit media watchdog, told the Post.

At an event in New York to launch the project, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg defended Breitbart’s inclusion. “You want to include a breadth of content to make sure all different topics can be covered,” Zuckerberg said.

Other outlets participating include The Washington Post, The New York Times, News Corp., BuzzFeed News, Business Insider, Bloomberg News, Fox News, NBCUniversal, USA Today and the Los Angeles Times.

The News tab marks the latest iteration of Facebook’s approach to online news, the Post reports. Before January 2018, the company had been a leading distributor of news, but that role was dogged by the presence in its feed of false and misleading information, as well as by allegations that its news feed and other features tilted toward liberal viewpoints

Zuckerberg did not go into specifics about how different publishers would be compensated, and media analysts expressed skepticism that the arrangement will help the small and medium local outlets that have been most seriously undercut by the rise of online news distribution.

“The vast majority of local news outlets are not included, and that is part of the news ecosystem that’s most at risk,” David Chavern, the president and chief executive of the News Media Alliance, a trade association of news publishers, told The Washington Post.

Chavern called Facebook’s agreement to pay at least some news outlets for their content a step in the right direction, noting that tech platforms have been “uniquely unwilling to pay for news and quality journalism.”

The News tab already is available to more than 200,000 Facebook users in the United States, with a broader rollout planned for early next year. The new service, Facebook executives say, should make it easier for users to locate the day’s major headlines, as well as stories geared toward particular topics or locales.

The initiative could reach 20 million to 30 million people over a few years, Zuckerberg said.

 Research contact: @washingtonpost