Posts tagged with "tiktok"

No bridezilla here: Woman’s lengthy, considerate wedding party survey gets rave reviews

July 29, 2021

In a world where bridezilla stories dominate headlines, there’s one bride-to-be who has won over TikTok with her considerate wedding planning process. Fox News reports.

Talia Morales, 29, began her wedding planning journey when she got engaged to her fiancé Eulalio Wolfe, 30, in June.

After throwing herself into full planning mode to meet their December 2021 wedding date, Morales went viral on TikTok for the thoughtful bridesmaid questionnaire she sent out to her wedding party through Google Forms—a free online survey platform.

In a four-part series she shared from her handle, @onemorwolf  on June 23, Morales showed her followers that Google Forms can help brides keep track of their bridal party’s comfort levels and preferences in a way that she feels is a more organized communication style than group chats.

For her four bridesmaids and maid of honor, Morales started off her form by greeting her bridal party and sharing details about her wedding theme and colors.

The form then goes on to ask for:

  • Each person’s name,
  • Where each bridesmaid wants to stay the night before the wedding,
  • Whether she wants her hair and makeup professionally done,
  • What she anticipates her bridesmaid dress budget to be, and
  • Her preferred style of dress and shoes.

“I consider myself to be organized and detailed, and I have used Google Forms many times for different tasks in the past,” Morales told Fox News, adding, “Now that I am wedding planning, those skills truly radiate. Planning a wedding is no easy task and the more organized, prepared, and detailed, the better.”

Other notable parts of her survey included inspiration photos and availability requests that can help determine scheduling for group dress shopping and pre-wedding events. 

Morales, who is from Texas, also provided an area where her bridesmaids can share ideas for a bachelorette party destination; and which dates and times would be ideal.

At the end, Morales included an open-ended section where her bridal party can voice questions, comments or concerns.

“I understand that each of my bridesmaids [has] a different budget, style, and schedule,” Morales wrote to Fox News. “They will be standing next to me on one of the most memorable days of my life. The least I can do is be mindful of their spending and their time.” 

From the responses she received, Morales was able to create a subsequent survey, where her bridesmaids could vote on the choices that were narrowed down from the previous Google Form.

When it comes down to how her bridal party felt about her inclusive questionnaires, Morales said, “Honestly, I could not have chosen a better group of girls. They are supportive and dependable, and I am truly blessed to have their friendship.”

In total, Morales’ videos have garnered more than 298,350 views and has inspired thousands of commenters.

“Thank you for doing this!! Your bridesmaids are so lucky,” one TikTok user commented.

Another user wrote, “This is exactly what every bride should do. This is really considerate of your [bridesmaids’] budget, time, & schedule.”

Research contact: @FoxNews

TikTok is taking the book industry by storm, and retailers are taking notice

July 20, 2021

Four years ago, author Adam Silvera released the young adult science fiction novel, They Both Die at the End, which found success and landed for a few weeks on The New York Times bestseller list.

After that fleeting experience with fame, Silvera settled in for a longer run of occasional sales and obscurity. But years later in August 2020, Silvera said his publisher noticed a significant sales bump, the start of a trend that would send the book to the top of The New York Times’ young adult paperback monthly bestseller list in April 2021, where it still reigns.

Silvera had no idea where the sales spike was coming from, according to a report by NBC News.

“I kept commenting to my readers, ‘Hey, don’t know what’s happening, but there’s been a surge in sales lately, so grateful that everybody’s finding the story years later,’” Silvera said. “And then that’s when a reader was like, ‘I’m seeing it on BookTok.’ And I had no idea what they were talking about.”

“BookTok” is a community of users on TikTok who post videos reviewing and recommending books. The group has boomed in popularity over the past year.

TikTok videos containing the hashtag #TheyBothDieAtTheEnd have collectively amassed more than 37 million views to date, many of which feature users reacting — and often crying — to the book’s emotional ending.

BookTok’s impact on the book industry has been notable, helping new authors launch their careers and propelling books like Silvera’s to the top of bestseller lists years after their original publication. Madeline Miller’s “The Song of Achilles,” E. Lockhart’s “We Were Liars” and Taylor Jenkins Reid’s “The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo”—all of which were published before BookTok began to dominate the industry—are among some of the other books that have found popularity on the app years after their initial release.

Retailers like Barnes & Noble have taken advantage of BookTok’s popularity to market titles popular on the app to customers by creating specialized shelves featuring books that have gone viral.

“We’re identifying these trends as big opportunities,” Shannon DeVito, director of Books at Barnes & Noble, told NBC News. “So [Barnes & Noble store managers] say, ‘Let’s create a table, let’s create a shelf, let’s create a statement because I know I have so many customers coming in saying, ‘I saw this trending on TikTok.’’”

DeVito said Barnes & Noble began noticing upticks in sales of books last summer, particularly the “juggernauts” of “The Song of Achilles” and “They Both Die at the End.” Since then, she said, almost all Barnes & Noble locations have put BookTok tables or shelves on display.

“We’ve seen big box retailers jump at the chance to engage with the #booktok community, like Barnes and Noble creating a dedicated ‘TikTok BookTok Reads’ section both online and in-store from creator recommendations,” a TikTok representative wrote in an email to NBC News. “We’ve also seen creators and brands lean into the #BookTok community—from the publisher side, Penguin Random House is very in-tune with #BookTok trends and frequently collaborates with creators.”

The app has been pivotal for introducing younger audiences to reading, DeVito said, as well as for introducing older titles to new readers and for helping new authors find an audience.

The BookTok phenomenon also closely coincided with the COVID-19 pandemic, which DeVito credits for people craving an emotional connection with others that they satisfied through reading.

Research contact: @NBCNews

Chlorophyll water is all over TikTok. But is it actually good for you?

My 13, 2021

Chlorophyll water has been gaining popularity since 2016, when celebrities began touting its health and beauty benefits. Now, TikTokers are claiming in viral videos that it can help treat acne and inflamed skin, reduce body odor, prevent cancer, and support gut health, HuffPost reports.

The most popular TikToks―which have garnered 1.5 million to 2 million “likes” to date―promote chlorophyll water’s transformative effects on the skin. In the videos, TikTokers show their skin’s progress over time and advise adding liquid chlorophyll drops to water rather than applying chlorophyll topically or swallowing a chlorophyll pill.

“Drinking liquid chlorophyll seems to hit on people’s intuitions about naturalness and purity, because you are taking water and adding something that comes from plants, which are instinctively viewed as pure,” noted Andrew Shtulman, a professor of Psychology at Occidental College in Los Angeles.

It is also easier to swallow chlorophyll than, say, cook green vegetables or exercise. After all, these health-boosting activities “take more effort, or we might not have the resources to purchase the materials or access to a space where we need to do them,” Shtulman said.

That said, HuffPost cautions, don’t expect it to be the cure TikTok users are making it sound. Like most things related to your well-being, there isn’t one magical solution or a quick fix. Here’s what to know:

First, it is important to remember that dietary supplements are not regulated or required to undergo Food and Drug Administration approval, said Judy Simon, a registered dietitian and nutritionist and adjunct faculty member at the University of Washington.

“Anyone can make all kinds of claims about chlorophyll supplements,” said Simon, so approach cautiously when you see them on your TikTok “For You” page.

To assess the true effectiveness of liquid chlorophyll, you need to look at chlorophyllin, a semi-synthetic form of chlorophyll found in liquid chlorophyll that is different from the natural version contained in plants, Simon said. This form allows it to be mixed into water and dissolve well.

However, HuffPost reports,the limited number of human studies on chlorophyllin’s effect on skin focus on topical application, as opposed to ingestion, and these studies involve only 10 people or fewer.

Board-certified dermatologist Joyce Park emphasized that better research is needed to uncover the benefits of using topical or liquid chlorophyll supplements.

While she did note that chlorophyll may hold potential benefits for the skin because “its antioxidant properties help with anti-aging and it also has anti-inflammatory properties to help treat acne,” the research remains limited.

Ultimately, Park advised against relying on chlorophyll as your sole antioxidant or acne treatment. And you can reap the benefits of natural chlorophyll by eating green vegetables, drinking matcha, or consuming spirulina, Simon said.

Existing studies are still inconclusive when it comes to drinking liquid chlorophyll for other health reasons. Some viral videos claim it can do everything from reduce body odor to prevent types of cancer, but there’s no solid evidence to suggest this is true.

A single study on mice did find that drinking chlorophyllin mixed with water may regulate the gut microbiome. But Simon said this doesn’t provide enough evidence for her to recommend it to her clients to boost their gut health.

After drinking chlorophyll water, you may experience side effects such as diarrhea or green-colored stools. Some experience an allergic reaction or have stomach cramps, prompting some people to seek medical help.

Drinking chlorophyll water isn’t likely to damage your skin, Park said. But it is still unclear whether chlorophyllin has other adverse impacts on your body when you use it long-term, since the only safety data that currently exists is for taking 300 milligrams daily for up to three months, Simon said.

And for those who are pregnant or breastfeeding, safety data does not yet exist, Simon said. If you fall into one of these groups, your doctor will likely advise you to avoid drinking chlorophyllin during these periods.

You also may be advised to avoid it if you take medications that increase your sensitivity to sunlight, like some antidepressants or blood pressure medication, as chlorophyllin can increase your chances of sunburn.

Research contact: @HuffPost

Bunny, the dog that can ‘talk,’ starts asking existential questions

May 12, 2021

When Bunny, TikTok’s beloved talking Sheepadoodle, stared at herself in a mirror and asked “Who this?” using her augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) device’s buttons, many followers believed she was having an existential crisis. Since then, the Internet-famous dog seemingly has become more interested in her own, dare we say,“sense of self,” Salon reports.

More recently on April 24, Alexis Devine, Bunny’s human parent—an artist based in Tacoma, Washington—has posted a video of Bunny pressing a button for “dog,” then a second button for “what,” a third button for “dog” and a fourth one for “is.” “Dog what dog is?” Devine narrated.

“This is happening so frequently that I’m going to add the buttons ‘animal’ ‘same’ and ‘different,'” Devine wrote in the caption which accompanied the Instagram post. 

The canine Bunny, who has 6.5 million followers on TikTok, is one of nearly 2,600 dogs and 300 cats enrolled in a project called “They Can Talk.” The study’s aim is to understand if animals can communicate with humans through AAC systems. AAC systems—such as Bunny’s giant labeled buttons that speak a single word when pressed—originally were designed to help humans with communication disorders. Yet they have been adapted to be used in language experiments with animals, such as the study Bunny is enrolled in, which is led by Federico Rossano, director of the Comparative Cognition Lab at the University of California–San Diego.

In Rossano’s study, participants receive instructions on how to set up their AAC buttons for their pets; generally, pets begin with easy words like “outside” and “play.” Pet parents set up cameras to constantly monitor the animals when they are in front of their boards—data that then is sent to the lab so that researchers examine what they say.

Now, Bunny’s followers have become obsessed with the notion that her language-learning is making her develop some kind of self-awareness. Is that possible?

And if so, does learning language have something to do with it?

“The question here is, is this a behavior that has been trained — like, look, I’m going to show you this individual here, this is ‘you’ or ‘dog,’ and don’t be afraid of it, and then over time the dog learns that,” Rossano told Salon. “Or to what degree is this spontaneous?”

If it is spontaneous, the research around the ethology for canines could get really interesting. Scientific evidence has previously suggested that dogs don’t recognize themselves in the mirror. The so-called mirror test is used to determine whether an animal has the ability of visual self-recognition, and is considered a marker of intelligence in animals. Elephants, chimpanzees, and dolphins are among the animals who have passed the test, but dogs typically don’t.

That might suggest dogs possess a lack of self-awareness. However, separate studies have shown that dogs can recognize their own scent, which hints at the opposite.

Péter Pongrácz, PhD, an associate professor in the Department of Ethology at Eötvös Loránd University in Budapest, Hungary, was curious if the standard mirror test was sufficient enough to determine whether or not dogs have “self-representation”—which, as Pongrácz explained, is what ethologists prefer to call “self-awareness” in animals. This curiosity led Pongrácz and a team of researchers to study dogs’ “self-representation” in a test called “the body as an obstacle.” As a behavioral test, the dogs were tasked with picking up an object and giving it to their owners while standing on a small mat. However, the object was attached to the mat, forcing the dogs to leave the mat in order to lift the object.

“Dogs came off the mat more frequently and sooner in the test condition, than in the main control condition, where the object was attached to the ground,” the researchers write in a paper published in the peer-reviewed journal Scientific Reports published by Nature. “This is the first convincing evidence of body awareness through the understanding of the consequence of own actions in a species where previously no higher-order self-representation capacity was found.”

Pongrácz told Salon via email that the “body as an obstacle test” is more suitable for dogs, and perhaps, theoretically, could be for more species because animals are then forced “to negotiate physical challenges where their bodies can impede their actions.” Pongrácz added that mental capacity is “complicated” and should be thought of as something that consists of “several building blocks.”

“Dogs are large bodied, fast moving animals that live in a complex environment and they have a well-developed cognitive capacity; therefore, it was reasonable to hypothesize that they would benefit from being capable of understanding that they ‘have a body’ that can interact with the environment,” Pongrácz said.

“As our test proved this, yes, we can say that dogs are aware of their body—and, as body-awareness is part of the complex self-representation system, yes, they can be considered as being self-aware,” he added.

As an online spectator observing her, it is hard to deny that Bunny isn’t becoming more curious about what “dogs” are, as she has been recorded wandering over to her word board pressing “dog” and then “what.” Another time, she asked “dog” and then “why,” which humans might interpret as her asking why she’s a dog. Devine says on Instagram that this line of questioning occurs “regularly” now.

But as Rossano said, the tricky part is sussing out what is learned behavior and what is Bunny’s own doing. And that’s a separate question from whether the AAC device has influenced her sense of self. After all, as Pongrácz said, mental capacity is comprised of building blocks; language may be just another block.

“I think there’s a good reason to believe that Bunny is probably capable of a sense of self and recognizing herself in the mirror, but to what degree is spontaneous versus learned over repeated exposures, I would say it’s more likely to be the latter than the former,” Rossano said, adding that “self-awareness” wasn’t something they were interested in measuring at first in the “They Can Talk” study. But now, that’s changed.

“We know that language helps not just communicate with others, but also helps us categorize; and it also gives us some sense of consistency and continuity over time,” Rossano said. In other words, self-awareness and language could be connected, as

Rossano said a new, key interest of his study is whether or not dogs have a sense of

Research contact: @Salon

What’s the skinny? Gen Z says boyfriend jeans are in; tight jeans are out

Febraury 16, 2021

A generational war has been playing out on TikTok for some time, although anyone over the age of 24 might be oblivious to the millions of “Millennial vs. Gen Z” videos that have appeared on the social media site in the past year, The Guardian reports.

But now the kids—also known as Zoomers—have turned their sights on something that Millennials apparently hold close—maybe too close: skinny jeans.

In scenes reminiscent of the OK Boomer meme that divided the generations in 2019, the videos are shining a light on how those in Generation Z—broadly defined as anyone born between the mid-90s and 2010—identify themselves in contrast with the generation(s) that came before them.

Since January, there have been 274,000 videos tagged “no skinny jeans” on TikTok and 8.3 million millennial v Gen Z videos. Earlier in the month the male supermodel Luka Sabbat told Esquire: “Skinny jeans don’t look as flattering nowadays.”

Indeed, a video made by TikTok user @momohkd instructs her 410,000 viewers to throw their skinny jeans away, set them alight, or cut them into something new. Like other users she says Millennials should stop wearing them to look youngerthe Guardian notes.

Skinny jeans became mainstream in 2005 after featuring in the Dior Homme autumn/winter collection, as overseen by Hedi Slimane. The size of the jeans—27 inches—was considered tiny—especially in contrast to the price tag: about £200 (US$238).

“Slimane’s skinny jeans were significant for their cut, but also for the bodies he showed them on —incredibly skinny bodies, both of male and female models,” says Emma McClendon, the author of Denim: Fashion’s Frontier. “This changed the marketing and styling of jeans advertisements away from the more sensual look that had dominated the market for bootcut, low-rise jeans to a more androgynous and impossibly thin figure.”

The skinny jean became part of the 2000s boho look of It-girls such as Paris Hilton, Lindsay Lohan, and Nicole Richie (as styled by Rachel Zoe); as well as a part of the alternative rock boom of the era, as seen on bands including the Strokes and Razorlight.

But, the Guardian reports, they never really went away: FLOTUS Jill Biden recently wore a pair on Instagram and they also became a distinguishing feature on the four lads in jeans meme.

What’s changing? There has been an increased focus on body inclusivity in fashion in recent years. In September Versace cast three plus-size models for the first time, and the plus-size model Paloma Elsesser was on the cover of U.S. Vogue in January..

On TikTok, Gen Z users have advocated for baggy jeans instead of slim-fit—eschewing the prescribed idea that thinness is attainable. According to market research company Edited, sales of men’s relaxed-fit jeans have increased by 15% and women’s wide-legged jeans are up 97%. The skinny v baggy online debate not only exposes a generational divide but other socioeconomic truths, too. “This is about issues of ‘taste’ but they intersect with issues of class, age, location, gender,” says McClendon.

The skinny jean, however, may prove hard to get rid of. Last month, Levi’s CEO Chip Bergh told investors he did not “think skinny jeans are ever going away on the women’s side of the business”, despite a clear trend towards “casual, looser-fitting clothes in general”, according to Business Insider.

McClendon added that they “always have a way of bouncing back. They are an extremely versatile and adaptable garment that carry such a multitude of cultural meanings that they will never be irrelevant.”

 Research contact: @guardian

Zoom, Peacock, and TikTok lead the fastest-growing brands of 2020

December11, 2020

While the pandemic has been anything but good for most U.S. businesses (think: restaurants, bars, air carriers, movie theaters, and gyms), some brand names actually saw rapid growth during the shutdown; as Americans relied on digital and vehicular delivery of food, prescriptions, cleaning products and masks, pet products, entertainment, and even business and casual meetings.

Now, Morning Consult has published its annual “Fastest Growing Brands” list, which it describes as “the definitive measure of brand growth for both emerging and established brands, showcasing a wide range of companies and products that have accelerated their consumer appeal and awareness in 2020.”

On this year’s list, the top spot was claimed by digital meetings provider  Zoom, Fast Company reports. No need to guess why, right? Surprisingly NBCUniversal’s fledgling video streaming service took the number-two spot. Less of a surprise was the brand that claimed the number-three honors: TikTok, a leading destination for short-form mobile video.

Morning Consult says that all the brands on this year’s list were shaped by changing consumer behavior resulting from the pandemic: “Nearly every brand that occupies a spot on the Fastest Growing Brands list is meaningfully connected to pandemic-related behavior, from at-home entertainment to cleaning products to pharmaceutical companies.”

The top 10 on Morning Consult’s fastest-growing brands of 2020 are:

  1. Zoom
  2. Peacock
  3. TikTok
  4. Instacart
  5. DoorDash
  6. HBO Max
  7. WhatsApp
  8. Microsoft Teams
  9. T Mobile
  10. Pfizer

You can check out the full list of brands here.

Research contact: @FastCompanyTop b

Bob Woodruff Foundation and NY Comedy Festival present first-ever virtual Stand Up for Heroes

November 11, 2020

New York’s highly anticipated night of hope, healing, and laughter honoring America’s veterans and their families—the 14th annual Stand Up for Heroes benefit—is going virtual this year; with support from a team of celebrities including Bruce SpringsteenJon Stewart, Prince Harry, Tiffany Haddish, Brad Paisley, Ray Romano, Patti Scialfa, Sheryl Crow, Nate Bargatze, Ronny Chieng, Jeannie Gaffigan, Mickey Guyton, and Iliza Shlesinger.

The benefit will air Wednesday, November 18 at 9:pm (EST) on ABC News Live, TikTok, Facebook Watch, Cheddar, Twitch, and Armed Forces Network.

Stand Up for Heroes was started by ABC News correspondent Bob Woodruff 14 years ago, shortly after he suffered devastating head injuries in Iraq while covering the war.. Over the years, it’s grown from New York’s Town Hall, to the Beacon Theater, to the 5,600-seat Theater at Madison Square Garden. The lineup shifts from year to year, but Springsteen has been a part of nearly all of them. Each time out, he plays a brief acoustic set and even tries out a few jokes, Yahoo News reports.

Hosted by Jon Stewart, the event also will highlight inspiring moments, memorable surprises, and stories of resilience ;while recognizing the men and women who have served in our nation’s military, the organizers said in a press release.

Stand Up for Heroes is presented by the Bob Woodruff Foundation and the New York Comedy Festival—and is also supported by Vehicles for Veterans, and sponsored by Craig Newmark Philanthropies and Veterans on Wall Street, led by Citi, HSBC Bank, and Wells Fargo.

SUFH has featured immense talent over the past 14 years, including comedians and performers Tony Bennett, Jimmy Carr, Ronnie Chieng, Eric Church, Stephen Colbert, Sheryl Crow, Jim Gaffigan, Ricky Gervais, Whoopi Goldberg, John Mayer, Seth Meyers, Hasan Minhaj, John Mulaney, Trevor Noah, Conan O’Brien, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Jerry Seinfeld, Bruce Springsteen, Jon Stewart, Ray Romano and Robin Williams.

Research contact: @YahooNews

‘Imagine’ John Lennon on TikTok: The singer’s estate honors his 80th birthday online

October 13, 2020

Some of John Lennon’s most memorable songs are being made available on the app TikTok, in honor of the singer-songwriter’s 80th birthday, which would have been celebrated on October 9, CNN reports.

The John Lennon Estate partnered with TikTok to bring Lennon’s music to the platform to put together a dedicated playlist of some of his best solo songs: “Instant Karma! (We All Shine On),” “Imagine,” “Mind Games,” “Beautiful Boy,” “Woman,” “Happy Xmas (War Is Over),” “Give Peace a Chance,” “Stand By Me,” “Nobody Told Me,” “Remember,” and “Gimme Some Truth.” (These songs were released by Lennon after The Beatles broke up in 1970.)

We’re super excited to launch my dad’s official TikTok account and cannot wait to see what his fans all over the world create using his music and his message of peace and love,” Sean Ono Lennon, the singer’s son with Yoko Ono, of his father’s music launching on TikTok in a statement.

TikTok previously partnered with the estate of the musician Prince to bring the late musician’s music to the platform.

Research contact: @CNN

Trump bans TikTok, WeChat from app stores beginning September 20

September 21, 2020

In a move that will sharply raise tensions with Beijing from app—and infuriate about 100 million American active users—the Trump Administration has announced that it is banning China’s virally popular TikTok, as well as the less sought-after WeChat, from mobile app stores beginning September 20, The Washington Post reports.

On Sunday, the United States also will ban any provision of Internet hosting services that enables WeChat to be used for money transfers or mobile payments. The Administration will give TikTok until November 12 until further bans kick in.

Western companies and bankers still continue to wrangle with TikTok’s owner, the White House, and Chinese authorities to try to arrange a sale of some of TikTok’s business, the Post says. Indeed, TikTok’s partnership with a U.S. corporation— most likely Oracle—could save it in this country, but details about such decisions remain unclear.

“Today’s actions prove once again that President Trump will do everything in his power to guarantee our national security and protect Americans from the threats of the Chinese Communist Party,” U.S. Department of Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said in a statement. “At the President’s direction, we have taken significant action to combat China’s malicious collection of American citizens’ personal data, while promoting our national values, democratic rules-based norms, and aggressive enforcement of U.S. laws and regulations.”

Meanwhile, the Independent reports, TikTok denies that it has shared user data with the Chinese government, or that it would do so if asked. The company says it has not censored videos at the request of Chinese authorities and insists it is not a national-security threat.

“The President has provided until November 12 for the national security concerns posed by TikTok to be resolved. If they are, the prohibitions in this order may be lifted,” Commerce said in its statement.

Research contact: @washingtonpost

Teens are overdosing on allergy medication as they take on the latest TikTok challenge

September 2, 2020

Millions of people are tackling the latest dance and fitness challenges on the wildly trending app, TikTok. But there’s a new challenge involving the over-the-counter allergy relief drug, Benadryl, that doctors say is dangerous—and could potentially be fatal.

The new challenge enticers TikTok followers to take large amounts —a dozen or more pills—of Benadryl—until they begin hallucinating, according to reports by Newsweek and Men’s Health.

“The dose that can cause a hallucination is very close to the dose that can cause something potentially life-threatening,” Scott Schaeffer, director of the Oklahoma Center for Poison and Drug Information warned during a recent interview, adding, “Large doses of Benadryl can cause seizures and, particularly, problems with the heart,” he said.

Last week, a 15-year-old Oklahoma girl died after reportedly taking the challenge. In May, three teens were treated at the Cook Children’s Medical Center in Fort Worth, Texas, after taking the challenge, reported ABC 10. One teen took 14 pills in a night.

Amber Jewison, nurse practitioner at Cook Children’s Medical Center, told ABC 10 these recent cases are different than previous Benadryl overdoses.

“We have seen kids who overdose in suicide attempts,” Jewison said. “But this was different. These kids weren’t trying to harm themselves. They watched a video and it told them exactly how many milligrams to take and to see how it made them feel.”

Jewison believes the novel coronavirus pandemic has caused teens to seek out excitement after being stuck at home.

“A lot of kids are bored right now due to the pandemic. So I think it expands their curiosities,” Jewison said. “Just be hyper-aware of what your kids are doing.”

Research contact: @MensHealthMag