Posts tagged with "tiktok"

Bob Woodruff Foundation and NY Comedy Festival present first-ever virtual Stand Up for Heroes

November 11, 2020

New York’s highly anticipated night of hope, healing, and laughter honoring America’s veterans and their families—the 14th annual Stand Up for Heroes benefit—is going virtual this year; with support from a team of celebrities including Bruce SpringsteenJon Stewart, Prince Harry, Tiffany Haddish, Brad Paisley, Ray Romano, Patti Scialfa, Sheryl Crow, Nate Bargatze, Ronny Chieng, Jeannie Gaffigan, Mickey Guyton, and Iliza Shlesinger.

The benefit will air Wednesday, November 18 at 9:pm (EST) on ABC News Live, TikTok, Facebook Watch, Cheddar, Twitch, and Armed Forces Network.

Stand Up for Heroes was started by ABC News correspondent Bob Woodruff 14 years ago, shortly after he suffered devastating head injuries in Iraq while covering the war.. Over the years, it’s grown from New York’s Town Hall, to the Beacon Theater, to the 5,600-seat Theater at Madison Square Garden. The lineup shifts from year to year, but Springsteen has been a part of nearly all of them. Each time out, he plays a brief acoustic set and even tries out a few jokes, Yahoo News reports.

Hosted by Jon Stewart, the event also will highlight inspiring moments, memorable surprises, and stories of resilience ;while recognizing the men and women who have served in our nation’s military, the organizers said in a press release.

Stand Up for Heroes is presented by the Bob Woodruff Foundation and the New York Comedy Festival—and is also supported by Vehicles for Veterans, and sponsored by Craig Newmark Philanthropies and Veterans on Wall Street, led by Citi, HSBC Bank, and Wells Fargo.

SUFH has featured immense talent over the past 14 years, including comedians and performers Tony Bennett, Jimmy Carr, Ronnie Chieng, Eric Church, Stephen Colbert, Sheryl Crow, Jim Gaffigan, Ricky Gervais, Whoopi Goldberg, John Mayer, Seth Meyers, Hasan Minhaj, John Mulaney, Trevor Noah, Conan O’Brien, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Jerry Seinfeld, Bruce Springsteen, Jon Stewart, Ray Romano and Robin Williams.

Research contact: @YahooNews

‘Imagine’ John Lennon on TikTok: The singer’s estate honors his 80th birthday online

October 13, 2020

Some of John Lennon’s most memorable songs are being made available on the app TikTok, in honor of the singer-songwriter’s 80th birthday, which would have been celebrated on October 9, CNN reports.

The John Lennon Estate partnered with TikTok to bring Lennon’s music to the platform to put together a dedicated playlist of some of his best solo songs: “Instant Karma! (We All Shine On),” “Imagine,” “Mind Games,” “Beautiful Boy,” “Woman,” “Happy Xmas (War Is Over),” “Give Peace a Chance,” “Stand By Me,” “Nobody Told Me,” “Remember,” and “Gimme Some Truth.” (These songs were released by Lennon after The Beatles broke up in 1970.)

We’re super excited to launch my dad’s official TikTok account and cannot wait to see what his fans all over the world create using his music and his message of peace and love,” Sean Ono Lennon, the singer’s son with Yoko Ono, of his father’s music launching on TikTok in a statement.

TikTok previously partnered with the estate of the musician Prince to bring the late musician’s music to the platform.

Research contact: @CNN

Trump bans TikTok, WeChat from app stores beginning September 20

September 21, 2020

In a move that will sharply raise tensions with Beijing from app—and infuriate about 100 million American active users—the Trump Administration has announced that it is banning China’s virally popular TikTok, as well as the less sought-after WeChat, from mobile app stores beginning September 20, The Washington Post reports.

On Sunday, the United States also will ban any provision of Internet hosting services that enables WeChat to be used for money transfers or mobile payments. The Administration will give TikTok until November 12 until further bans kick in.

Western companies and bankers still continue to wrangle with TikTok’s owner, the White House, and Chinese authorities to try to arrange a sale of some of TikTok’s business, the Post says. Indeed, TikTok’s partnership with a U.S. corporation— most likely Oracle—could save it in this country, but details about such decisions remain unclear.

“Today’s actions prove once again that President Trump will do everything in his power to guarantee our national security and protect Americans from the threats of the Chinese Communist Party,” U.S. Department of Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said in a statement. “At the President’s direction, we have taken significant action to combat China’s malicious collection of American citizens’ personal data, while promoting our national values, democratic rules-based norms, and aggressive enforcement of U.S. laws and regulations.”

Meanwhile, the Independent reports, TikTok denies that it has shared user data with the Chinese government, or that it would do so if asked. The company says it has not censored videos at the request of Chinese authorities and insists it is not a national-security threat.

“The President has provided until November 12 for the national security concerns posed by TikTok to be resolved. If they are, the prohibitions in this order may be lifted,” Commerce said in its statement.

Research contact: @washingtonpost

Teens are overdosing on allergy medication as they take on the latest TikTok challenge

September 2, 2020

Millions of people are tackling the latest dance and fitness challenges on the wildly trending app, TikTok. But there’s a new challenge involving the over-the-counter allergy relief drug, Benadryl, that doctors say is dangerous—and could potentially be fatal.

The new challenge enticers TikTok followers to take large amounts —a dozen or more pills—of Benadryl—until they begin hallucinating, according to reports by Newsweek and Men’s Health.

“The dose that can cause a hallucination is very close to the dose that can cause something potentially life-threatening,” Scott Schaeffer, director of the Oklahoma Center for Poison and Drug Information warned during a recent interview, adding, “Large doses of Benadryl can cause seizures and, particularly, problems with the heart,” he said.

Last week, a 15-year-old Oklahoma girl died after reportedly taking the challenge. In May, three teens were treated at the Cook Children’s Medical Center in Fort Worth, Texas, after taking the challenge, reported ABC 10. One teen took 14 pills in a night.

Amber Jewison, nurse practitioner at Cook Children’s Medical Center, told ABC 10 these recent cases are different than previous Benadryl overdoses.

“We have seen kids who overdose in suicide attempts,” Jewison said. “But this was different. These kids weren’t trying to harm themselves. They watched a video and it told them exactly how many milligrams to take and to see how it made them feel.”

Jewison believes the novel coronavirus pandemic has caused teens to seek out excitement after being stuck at home.

“A lot of kids are bored right now due to the pandemic. So I think it expands their curiosities,” Jewison said. “Just be hyper-aware of what your kids are doing.”

Research contact: @MensHealthMag

Foxy ladies: A new eye makeup technique is trending—but critics insist it is racist

August 19, 2020

On Instagram, TikTok and YouTube, people from all over the world have been posting videos and photos modeling “the look”—using makeup and other tactics to emulate the lifted, so-called “almond-shaped” or “fox eyes” of celebrities such as Kendall Jenner, Bella Hadid, and Megan Fox.

Fox-eye makeup tutorials show how to use a combination of eye shadow, eyeliner, and fake eyelashes to get a winged aesthetic. Tips include shaving off the tail end of eyebrows and redrawing them to appear straighter and angled upwards. Others have suggested pulling hair back into a high ponytail or using tape to further lift the eyes.

Accentuating eyes to appear slanted, or elongated in shape, creates a more sultry effect, according to some makeup artists creating the look. But to Asian Americans, the “migraine pose” that sometimes accompanies these images— using one or two hands to pull the eyes up by the temples to exaggerate the result -—is far too similar to the action used to demean them in the past, CNN reports.

Indeed, they assert, it’s a form of cultural appropriation.

Kelly H. Chong, a Sociology professor at the University of Kansas, defines cultural appropriation as the adoption, often unacknowledged or inappropriate, of the ideas, practices, customs and cultural identity markers of one group by members of another group whom have greater privilege or power.

“The cultural influencers from the dominant group legitimize it as a cool style ‘trend,’ and in the process exoticize and eroticize it,” Chong added in an e-mail interview with CNN. Even the term “almond eyes,” she says, which is being used to describe the shape of fox eyes, has long been used to describe the shape of Asian eyes.

She points to Hollywood’s uncomfortable past in the appropriating the shape of Asian eyes. In the early 1930s, makeup artist Cecil Holland used techniques — some, similar to creating fox eyes today—to transform White actors into villainous Asian characters, like Fu Manchu. And Mickey Rooney, the White actor playing the part of Holly Golightly’s thickly-accented Japanese neighbor in Breakfast at Tiffany’s cemented “the buck-toothed, slit-eyed Asian man look” in the popular imagination.

TikTok user @LeahMelle, whose video denouncing the fox-eye look went viral, said she couldn’t believe that such a trend could be so popular nowadays: “This wasn’t some dated movie where you could blame the distorted norms of the time period. This was happening now. And it was still viewed as acceptable,” she wrote in an email.

Emma Chamberlain, an influencer with 9.8 million followers on Instagram, was criticized recently for posting a picture that showed her striking this pose while sticking out her tongue.

Her fans rushed to defend her—commenting that those who felt offended were “overreacting.” Chamberlain later deleted the picture and apologized, saying it wasn’t her “intention” to pose in an “insensitive way” and that she was “so sorry to those who were hurt by it.”

But the damage already had been done.

“They mock my eyes, then say ching chong; call me a dog eater and then call me a ch*nk. Like why would you think I’d be fine with Emma’s post?” one person tweeted. “Obviously if she gets to do slant eyes whilst getting praised but it’s my natural eye shape and I’m getting discriminated (of course) I’m mad.”

“It’s a new trend that brings out old stereotypes and old taunts,” Wang said in a phone interview with CNN. “Because it makes people like me feel uncomfortable and (to) some degree annoyed, it’s time to talk about it.”

Like most beauty trends, the craze for fox eyes will eventually subside, and has begun to already since it first came about earlier this year. But that’s exactly the problem, according to Stephanie Hu, founder of Dear Asian Youth, a California-based organization that encourages Asian activism.

In an Instagram post, entitled “The problem with the #FoxEye trend,” the organization wrote, “While it may not have originated from a place of ill-intent, it appropriates our eyes and is ignorant of past racism.”

“It really feels like this is a temporary trend,” Hu told CNN, adding that she believes Asians’ eye shapes aren’t just something to be casually adopted and then “given back” when the trend is over. “Our eyes are something that we have to live with every day,” Hu said in a phone interview.

Research contact: @CNN

Their lips are sealed: The #tinyfacechallenge is the latest quarantine obsession

May 14, 2020

While many of us who are sheltering in place are trying “to put a brave face on it;” others are “wiping the (natural) grin off their faces”—and instead competing in the #tinyfacechallenge on Instagram, TikTok, and Twitter.

Makeup wizards are flooding social media with hundreds of wacky—and even slightly creepy—makeovers that create the cartoonish illusion of a freakishly petite face, The New York Post reports.

Using hashtags including #tinyfacechallenge, #tinyfacemakeupchallenge, and #tinyface, people are covering up the bottom half of their faces with scarves and then painting tiny mouth replicas and nostrils on their noses, The Post says. The effects veer anywhere from disturbing to hilarious. (And some are doing it “backwards,” with new eyes and brows painted beneath their real ones, which are covered up with a scarf or mask.)

One popular six-minute video by cosmetologist Jaime French has racked up nearly 1.4 million views since she posted it to Instagram on April 29.

The tutorial caught the attention of admirers who attempted to mirror her expertise. Others also posted their own video primers.

Some inspired artists even incorporate nose piercings into their new visages by transforming them into lip piercings for the finished makeover. Others make use of cups and straws as props so their new faux mouths look functional and slurp-ready.

Perhaps beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Brooklyn “drag enthusiast” @strewniverse put together a particularly unsettling face while noting in the caption, “… honestly I’ve never felt more glamorous.” Or, in the words of another challenge-taker, “Quarantine makes you do Strange things.”

Research contact: @nypost

Going south? Facebook, Netflix, and Twitter beg off South by Southwest over coronavirus fears

March 9, 2020

They may be “social media,” but right now, hobnobbing with hordes of people is not their mission: Facebook, Netflix, TikTok, and Twitter have joined the growing list of companies—including Warner Music—that are dropping out of the South by Southwest (SXSW) Festival amid the novel coronavirus outbreak, ABC News reports.

Apple is also, by many accounts, pulling out—but has not confirmed the rumors.

The tech, film, and music festival is slated to take place March 13 to 22 in Austin, Texas—and organizers said at a news conference on March 4 that the event is still scheduled to take place, as planned; and that canceling it wouldn’t make the community safer.

“Right now, there is no evidence that closing South by Southwest or other activities is going to make this community safer. We are constantly monitoring that situation,” Dr. Mark Escott, the interim medical director for Austin Public Health, told reporters. “One of the concerns is that if we shut down or make the recommendation to shut down South by Southwest, people will still continue to come here … but without that organizational structure that South by Southwest provides.”

Festival organizers are increasing the availability of hand-washing and sanitizing stations— as well as screening employees’ and volunteers’ temperatures—to help allay anxieties over COVID-19, Escott added.

Also on Wednesday, health officials in Texas announced the state’s first confirmed case of coronavirus in Fort Bend County, outside of Houston.

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey was scheduled to be one of the event’s speakers, but his name no longer appears on the website, ABC News noted. “Twitter is implementing a mandatory global business travel restriction for our employees, effective immediately. This unfortunately includes SXSW,” a Twitter spokesperson told the nework news outlet.

A Facebook spokesperson similarly said, “Due to concerns related to coronavirus, our company and employees will not be participating in SXSW this year.”

Netflix and TikTok also both confirmed to ABC News on Thursday, March 5, that they would not be participating. Apple did not immediately respond to ABC News’ request for comment, although Reuters reported that the company had opted not to attend.

Organizers and the city of Austin have faced widespread calls to call off the festival this year. A Change.org petition calling for it to be canceled had garnered nearly 50,000 signatures as of Thursday.

Calling off the festival would be a major blow to the local economy. The gathering injects up to $350 million into Austin’s economy, according to a 2018 analysis by Greyhill Advisors, funded by South by Southwest.

Research contact: @ABC

Editor’s note: Under pressure to keep a lid on COVID-19, Austin has canceled SXSW, as of Friday night, March 6.