Posts tagged with "tiktok"

This baby and his swim instructor are friendship goals

October 22, 2021

A baby and his swim lesson instructor are the cutest friends and now the two are going viral on TikTok.

Tracey Martorana put her son, Lucas, now ten months old, in group swim lessons at three months at Saf-T-Swim in Wantagh, New York. He immediately formed a bond with one of the swim instructors, Carlson Rogers, and has been doing private lessons once a week with him ever since.

“Being a pandemic baby, our circle is really small,” Martorana recently told ABC-TV’s Good Morning America. “He knows the grandparents, immediate family and then there’s Carlson. Carlson is a part of our crew.”

Martorana said Carlson is the best swim instructor for Lucas because he goes with the flow and doesn’t push him too hard. If Lucas is crying, she said Carlson will give him time to sort it out; but if Lucas is splashing, he loves to splash and play along with him.

“I love watching the relationship,” Martorana said. “Carlson is a big strapping man and Lucas loves to hug him and hold onto him.”

While Lucas was at a recent swim lesson, Martorana took a video of a touching moment between Lucas and Carlson and posted it to TikTok.

“The comment section is hysterical. Everyone loves Carlson,” Martorana said. “I think it was just something important for people to see. Love knows no bounds.”

Research contact: @GMA

Not an evil twin: Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson is amazed by likeness to Alabama police officer

September 2, 2021

The Internet has discovered Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson’s doppelgänger and even he’s in awe of the similarities, HuffPost reports.

The 49-year-old actor, currently at the box office in Jungle Cruise, tweeted this week in response to a post by Bleacher Report that showed himself alongside an Alabama police officer named Eric Fields.

“Oh sh*t! Wow,” wrote Johnson in response to his likeness to the patrol lieutenant of the Morgan County Sheriff’s Office. Of Fields, Johnson quipped that he’s “way cooler” and implored him to “stay safe brother and thank you for your service.”

He added that “one day we’ll drink @Teremana and I need to hear all your “Rock stories” because I KNOW you got ’em.” Teremana is the “Jungle Cruise” star’s brand of tequila.

The Morgan County Sheriff’s Office shared a snapshot of Fields and a local man on their Facebook page earlier this month—noting that the man had informed a fellow police officer that he “wanted to meet our Deputy that people say looks like ‘The Rock.’”

Fields and the man are all smiles in the photograph.

News of Fields and The Rock looking like twins even hit TikTok, with locals in Alabama highlighting the resemblance with hilarious videos:

For his part, Fields, who is 37 and has worked for the Morgan County Sheriff’s Office for 17 years, told AL.com that it’s been a “running joke” for him that he looks so much like both The Rock and, apparently, Vin Diesel.

“I’ve been called The Rock and Vin Diesel’s love child,” Fields told the outlet last week. “I go along with it. It’s humorous. It’s flattering. It could be worse people, I guess.”

Research contact: @HuffPost

Slinky seeks a new jingle after 75 years with a National Slinky Day campaign

August 31, 2021

This month, children’s consumer goods leader Just Play, based in Boca Raton, Florida, has launched a new jingle for  Slinky, the original walking spring toy—and is inviting others to join in by creating their own remixes. Content creators are encouraged to follow @originally_slinky and create their own #SlinkyRemix.

Introduced in tandem with National Slinky Day on August 30, the new interactive campaign remixes the original Slinky jingle across social platforms such as TikTok and Instagram, leveraging influencers to get the word out and drive participation.

This initiative kicks off Just Play’s partnership with Philadelphia-based  creative agency Red Tettemer O’Connell + Partners (RTO+P).

“National Slinky Day is the perfect time to bring this iconic brand to a new generation in a fresh, relevant way,” said Geoffrey Greenberg, co-president of Just Play, in a company press release, adding, “Slinky truly is the original fidget toy and has long been an inspiration for creativity and innovation since its invention by Richard and Betty James in 1945. We’re excited to see where today’s content creators will take it.”

The campaign launches y with a 30-second video across social platforms. The clip mashes up old archival footage with new imagery of adults playing with Slinkys. The post directs consumers to Slinkys SoundCloud page, where they can access original Slinky jingle elements to create their own remix. Anyone who posts a new Slinky sound with #SlinkyRemix and tags the brand (@original_slinky) could win a Slinky Swag Pack, containing Slinkys and gear. Plus, one jingle will be featured in a national advertising campaign and win the ultimate Slinky prize package.

Slinky debuted in 1945 at Gimbels Department Store in Philadelphia and sustained popularity throughout the rest of the 20th century. When it was inducted into the National Toy Hall of Fame in 2000, more than 250 million had been sold to date.

esearch contact: @JustPlayToys

Like falling off a log? Viral milk crate challenge on TikTok is denounced by orthopedists

August 26, 2021

The latest challenge to take the Internet by storm involves precariously stacked milk crates, balance—and some painful falls, The Guardian reports.

To complete the challenge, which recently started on TikTok, participants face a set of milk crates piled up in the shape of a pyramid—and attempt to climb to the top and then back down again without toppling over.

As videos of people falling painfully go viral on social media and rack up millions of views, doctors across the US are coming out to warn people of the dangerous injuries that can occur.

“It’s perhaps even worse than falling from a ladder,” Shawn Anthony, an orthopedic surgeon at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City told The Washington Post this week, adding, “It’s very difficult to brace yourself from the falls I’ve seen in these videos. They’re putting their joints at an even higher risk for injury.”

With many hospitals nationwide already overwhelmed by COVID-19 patients and running short on space and staff, health departments are urging people to reconsider their choices before taking on the challenge.

George Gantsoudes, a Virginia-based orthopedic surgeon, wrote on Twitter: “The orthopaedic surgeries required to fix problems caused by this may fall under the umbrella of ‘elective surgeries’.”

On Monday, the Baltimore city health department tweeted: “With COVID-19 hospitalizations rising around the country, please check with your local hospital to see if they have a bed available for you, before attempting the #milkcratechallenge.”

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) also weighed in on the challenge after comedian Conan O’Brien  joked about how he needed federal officials to grant permission to the challenge before attempting it—playing off the FDA’s approval of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine earlier this week.

“Waiting for FDA approval before I take the Milk Crate Challenge,” O’Brien tweeted on Monday. The FDA responded shortly after, writing: “Although we regulate milk, we can’t recommend you try that. Perhaps enjoy a nice glass of 2% and return all those crates to the grocery store?”

The milk crate challenge is the latest of a slew of dares that have gone viral on TikTok. In recent months, the video-sharing platform has seen a rise of dangerous challenge—among them, the blackout challenge, which encouraged young people to hold their breath until they passed out, and the Benadryl challenge, which challenged young people to intentionally consume large amounts of the antihistamine to induce hallucinations.

In a statement about the most recent challenge, a TikTok spokesperson said: “TikTok prohibits content that promotes or glorifies dangerous acts, and we remove videos and redirect searches to our community guidelines to discourage such content. We encourage everyone to exercise caution in their behavior whether online or offline.”

Research contact: @guardian

TikTok named as the most downloaded app of 2020

August 12, 2021

TikTok was the world’s most downloaded app in 2020—taking the top spot from the 2019 winner, Facebook Messenger, according to digital analytics company App Annie.

The Chinese video-sharing platform is the only app not owned by Facebook to make the global top five of downloads, according to a BBC report.

In its home country, TikTok’s owner ByteDance also holds the top spot, along with the Chinese language video app Douyin.

Indeed, TikTok’s popularity has soared—even after former U.S. President Donald Trump tried to ban it in America. The Trump Administration claimed that TikTok posed a national security risk as the Chinese government had access to its user data. The company repeatedly denied the allegations—and now the pressure is off.

Since becoming U.S. President in January, Joe Biden has withdrawn Trump’s executive order.

Facebook-owned apps have held the top spot since the survey started in 2018 and the company still dominated the chart in 2020. Although it didn’t take first place, Mark Zuckerberg’s social media giant accounted for the rest of the top five with Facebook’s flagship app, as well as WhatsApp, Instagram, and Facebook Messenger all making an appearance.

Research contact: @BBC

No bridezilla here: Woman’s lengthy, considerate wedding party survey gets rave reviews

July 29, 2021

In a world where bridezilla stories dominate headlines, there’s one bride-to-be who has won over TikTok with her considerate wedding planning process. Fox News reports.

Talia Morales, 29, began her wedding planning journey when she got engaged to her fiancé Eulalio Wolfe, 30, in June.

After throwing herself into full planning mode to meet their December 2021 wedding date, Morales went viral on TikTok for the thoughtful bridesmaid questionnaire she sent out to her wedding party through Google Forms—a free online survey platform.

In a four-part series she shared from her handle, @onemorwolf  on June 23, Morales showed her followers that Google Forms can help brides keep track of their bridal party’s comfort levels and preferences in a way that she feels is a more organized communication style than group chats.

For her four bridesmaids and maid of honor, Morales started off her form by greeting her bridal party and sharing details about her wedding theme and colors.

The form then goes on to ask for:

  • Each person’s name,
  • Where each bridesmaid wants to stay the night before the wedding,
  • Whether she wants her hair and makeup professionally done,
  • What she anticipates her bridesmaid dress budget to be, and
  • Her preferred style of dress and shoes.

“I consider myself to be organized and detailed, and I have used Google Forms many times for different tasks in the past,” Morales told Fox News, adding, “Now that I am wedding planning, those skills truly radiate. Planning a wedding is no easy task and the more organized, prepared, and detailed, the better.”

Other notable parts of her survey included inspiration photos and availability requests that can help determine scheduling for group dress shopping and pre-wedding events. 

Morales, who is from Texas, also provided an area where her bridesmaids can share ideas for a bachelorette party destination; and which dates and times would be ideal.

At the end, Morales included an open-ended section where her bridal party can voice questions, comments or concerns.

“I understand that each of my bridesmaids [has] a different budget, style, and schedule,” Morales wrote to Fox News. “They will be standing next to me on one of the most memorable days of my life. The least I can do is be mindful of their spending and their time.” 

From the responses she received, Morales was able to create a subsequent survey, where her bridesmaids could vote on the choices that were narrowed down from the previous Google Form.

When it comes down to how her bridal party felt about her inclusive questionnaires, Morales said, “Honestly, I could not have chosen a better group of girls. They are supportive and dependable, and I am truly blessed to have their friendship.”

In total, Morales’ videos have garnered more than 298,350 views and has inspired thousands of commenters.

“Thank you for doing this!! Your bridesmaids are so lucky,” one TikTok user commented.

Another user wrote, “This is exactly what every bride should do. This is really considerate of your [bridesmaids’] budget, time, & schedule.”

Research contact: @FoxNews

TikTok is taking the book industry by storm, and retailers are taking notice

July 20, 2021

Four years ago, author Adam Silvera released the young adult science fiction novel, They Both Die at the End, which found success and landed for a few weeks on The New York Times bestseller list.

After that fleeting experience with fame, Silvera settled in for a longer run of occasional sales and obscurity. But years later in August 2020, Silvera said his publisher noticed a significant sales bump, the start of a trend that would send the book to the top of The New York Times’ young adult paperback monthly bestseller list in April 2021, where it still reigns.

Silvera had no idea where the sales spike was coming from, according to a report by NBC News.

“I kept commenting to my readers, ‘Hey, don’t know what’s happening, but there’s been a surge in sales lately, so grateful that everybody’s finding the story years later,’” Silvera said. “And then that’s when a reader was like, ‘I’m seeing it on BookTok.’ And I had no idea what they were talking about.”

“BookTok” is a community of users on TikTok who post videos reviewing and recommending books. The group has boomed in popularity over the past year.

TikTok videos containing the hashtag #TheyBothDieAtTheEnd have collectively amassed more than 37 million views to date, many of which feature users reacting — and often crying — to the book’s emotional ending.

BookTok’s impact on the book industry has been notable, helping new authors launch their careers and propelling books like Silvera’s to the top of bestseller lists years after their original publication. Madeline Miller’s “The Song of Achilles,” E. Lockhart’s “We Were Liars” and Taylor Jenkins Reid’s “The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo”—all of which were published before BookTok began to dominate the industry—are among some of the other books that have found popularity on the app years after their initial release.

Retailers like Barnes & Noble have taken advantage of BookTok’s popularity to market titles popular on the app to customers by creating specialized shelves featuring books that have gone viral.

“We’re identifying these trends as big opportunities,” Shannon DeVito, director of Books at Barnes & Noble, told NBC News. “So [Barnes & Noble store managers] say, ‘Let’s create a table, let’s create a shelf, let’s create a statement because I know I have so many customers coming in saying, ‘I saw this trending on TikTok.’’”

DeVito said Barnes & Noble began noticing upticks in sales of books last summer, particularly the “juggernauts” of “The Song of Achilles” and “They Both Die at the End.” Since then, she said, almost all Barnes & Noble locations have put BookTok tables or shelves on display.

“We’ve seen big box retailers jump at the chance to engage with the #booktok community, like Barnes and Noble creating a dedicated ‘TikTok BookTok Reads’ section both online and in-store from creator recommendations,” a TikTok representative wrote in an email to NBC News. “We’ve also seen creators and brands lean into the #BookTok community—from the publisher side, Penguin Random House is very in-tune with #BookTok trends and frequently collaborates with creators.”

The app has been pivotal for introducing younger audiences to reading, DeVito said, as well as for introducing older titles to new readers and for helping new authors find an audience.

The BookTok phenomenon also closely coincided with the COVID-19 pandemic, which DeVito credits for people craving an emotional connection with others that they satisfied through reading.

Research contact: @NBCNews

Chlorophyll water is all over TikTok. But is it actually good for you?

My 13, 2021

Chlorophyll water has been gaining popularity since 2016, when celebrities began touting its health and beauty benefits. Now, TikTokers are claiming in viral videos that it can help treat acne and inflamed skin, reduce body odor, prevent cancer, and support gut health, HuffPost reports.

The most popular TikToks―which have garnered 1.5 million to 2 million “likes” to date―promote chlorophyll water’s transformative effects on the skin. In the videos, TikTokers show their skin’s progress over time and advise adding liquid chlorophyll drops to water rather than applying chlorophyll topically or swallowing a chlorophyll pill.

“Drinking liquid chlorophyll seems to hit on people’s intuitions about naturalness and purity, because you are taking water and adding something that comes from plants, which are instinctively viewed as pure,” noted Andrew Shtulman, a professor of Psychology at Occidental College in Los Angeles.

It is also easier to swallow chlorophyll than, say, cook green vegetables or exercise. After all, these health-boosting activities “take more effort, or we might not have the resources to purchase the materials or access to a space where we need to do them,” Shtulman said.

That said, HuffPost cautions, don’t expect it to be the cure TikTok users are making it sound. Like most things related to your well-being, there isn’t one magical solution or a quick fix. Here’s what to know:

First, it is important to remember that dietary supplements are not regulated or required to undergo Food and Drug Administration approval, said Judy Simon, a registered dietitian and nutritionist and adjunct faculty member at the University of Washington.

“Anyone can make all kinds of claims about chlorophyll supplements,” said Simon, so approach cautiously when you see them on your TikTok “For You” page.

To assess the true effectiveness of liquid chlorophyll, you need to look at chlorophyllin, a semi-synthetic form of chlorophyll found in liquid chlorophyll that is different from the natural version contained in plants, Simon said. This form allows it to be mixed into water and dissolve well.

However, HuffPost reports,the limited number of human studies on chlorophyllin’s effect on skin focus on topical application, as opposed to ingestion, and these studies involve only 10 people or fewer.

Board-certified dermatologist Joyce Park emphasized that better research is needed to uncover the benefits of using topical or liquid chlorophyll supplements.

While she did note that chlorophyll may hold potential benefits for the skin because “its antioxidant properties help with anti-aging and it also has anti-inflammatory properties to help treat acne,” the research remains limited.

Ultimately, Park advised against relying on chlorophyll as your sole antioxidant or acne treatment. And you can reap the benefits of natural chlorophyll by eating green vegetables, drinking matcha, or consuming spirulina, Simon said.

Existing studies are still inconclusive when it comes to drinking liquid chlorophyll for other health reasons. Some viral videos claim it can do everything from reduce body odor to prevent types of cancer, but there’s no solid evidence to suggest this is true.

A single study on mice did find that drinking chlorophyllin mixed with water may regulate the gut microbiome. But Simon said this doesn’t provide enough evidence for her to recommend it to her clients to boost their gut health.

After drinking chlorophyll water, you may experience side effects such as diarrhea or green-colored stools. Some experience an allergic reaction or have stomach cramps, prompting some people to seek medical help.

Drinking chlorophyll water isn’t likely to damage your skin, Park said. But it is still unclear whether chlorophyllin has other adverse impacts on your body when you use it long-term, since the only safety data that currently exists is for taking 300 milligrams daily for up to three months, Simon said.

And for those who are pregnant or breastfeeding, safety data does not yet exist, Simon said. If you fall into one of these groups, your doctor will likely advise you to avoid drinking chlorophyllin during these periods.

You also may be advised to avoid it if you take medications that increase your sensitivity to sunlight, like some antidepressants or blood pressure medication, as chlorophyllin can increase your chances of sunburn.

Research contact: @HuffPost

Bunny, the dog that can ‘talk,’ starts asking existential questions

May 12, 2021

When Bunny, TikTok’s beloved talking Sheepadoodle, stared at herself in a mirror and asked “Who this?” using her augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) device’s buttons, many followers believed she was having an existential crisis. Since then, the Internet-famous dog seemingly has become more interested in her own, dare we say,“sense of self,” Salon reports.

More recently on April 24, Alexis Devine, Bunny’s human parent—an artist based in Tacoma, Washington—has posted a video of Bunny pressing a button for “dog,” then a second button for “what,” a third button for “dog” and a fourth one for “is.” “Dog what dog is?” Devine narrated.

“This is happening so frequently that I’m going to add the buttons ‘animal’ ‘same’ and ‘different,'” Devine wrote in the caption which accompanied the Instagram post. 

The canine Bunny, who has 6.5 million followers on TikTok, is one of nearly 2,600 dogs and 300 cats enrolled in a project called “They Can Talk.” The study’s aim is to understand if animals can communicate with humans through AAC systems. AAC systems—such as Bunny’s giant labeled buttons that speak a single word when pressed—originally were designed to help humans with communication disorders. Yet they have been adapted to be used in language experiments with animals, such as the study Bunny is enrolled in, which is led by Federico Rossano, director of the Comparative Cognition Lab at the University of California–San Diego.

In Rossano’s study, participants receive instructions on how to set up their AAC buttons for their pets; generally, pets begin with easy words like “outside” and “play.” Pet parents set up cameras to constantly monitor the animals when they are in front of their boards—data that then is sent to the lab so that researchers examine what they say.

Now, Bunny’s followers have become obsessed with the notion that her language-learning is making her develop some kind of self-awareness. Is that possible?

And if so, does learning language have something to do with it?

“The question here is, is this a behavior that has been trained — like, look, I’m going to show you this individual here, this is ‘you’ or ‘dog,’ and don’t be afraid of it, and then over time the dog learns that,” Rossano told Salon. “Or to what degree is this spontaneous?”

If it is spontaneous, the research around the ethology for canines could get really interesting. Scientific evidence has previously suggested that dogs don’t recognize themselves in the mirror. The so-called mirror test is used to determine whether an animal has the ability of visual self-recognition, and is considered a marker of intelligence in animals. Elephants, chimpanzees, and dolphins are among the animals who have passed the test, but dogs typically don’t.

That might suggest dogs possess a lack of self-awareness. However, separate studies have shown that dogs can recognize their own scent, which hints at the opposite.

Péter Pongrácz, PhD, an associate professor in the Department of Ethology at Eötvös Loránd University in Budapest, Hungary, was curious if the standard mirror test was sufficient enough to determine whether or not dogs have “self-representation”—which, as Pongrácz explained, is what ethologists prefer to call “self-awareness” in animals. This curiosity led Pongrácz and a team of researchers to study dogs’ “self-representation” in a test called “the body as an obstacle.” As a behavioral test, the dogs were tasked with picking up an object and giving it to their owners while standing on a small mat. However, the object was attached to the mat, forcing the dogs to leave the mat in order to lift the object.

“Dogs came off the mat more frequently and sooner in the test condition, than in the main control condition, where the object was attached to the ground,” the researchers write in a paper published in the peer-reviewed journal Scientific Reports published by Nature. “This is the first convincing evidence of body awareness through the understanding of the consequence of own actions in a species where previously no higher-order self-representation capacity was found.”

Pongrácz told Salon via email that the “body as an obstacle test” is more suitable for dogs, and perhaps, theoretically, could be for more species because animals are then forced “to negotiate physical challenges where their bodies can impede their actions.” Pongrácz added that mental capacity is “complicated” and should be thought of as something that consists of “several building blocks.”

“Dogs are large bodied, fast moving animals that live in a complex environment and they have a well-developed cognitive capacity; therefore, it was reasonable to hypothesize that they would benefit from being capable of understanding that they ‘have a body’ that can interact with the environment,” Pongrácz said.

“As our test proved this, yes, we can say that dogs are aware of their body—and, as body-awareness is part of the complex self-representation system, yes, they can be considered as being self-aware,” he added.

As an online spectator observing her, it is hard to deny that Bunny isn’t becoming more curious about what “dogs” are, as she has been recorded wandering over to her word board pressing “dog” and then “what.” Another time, she asked “dog” and then “why,” which humans might interpret as her asking why she’s a dog. Devine says on Instagram that this line of questioning occurs “regularly” now.

But as Rossano said, the tricky part is sussing out what is learned behavior and what is Bunny’s own doing. And that’s a separate question from whether the AAC device has influenced her sense of self. After all, as Pongrácz said, mental capacity is comprised of building blocks; language may be just another block.

“I think there’s a good reason to believe that Bunny is probably capable of a sense of self and recognizing herself in the mirror, but to what degree is spontaneous versus learned over repeated exposures, I would say it’s more likely to be the latter than the former,” Rossano said, adding that “self-awareness” wasn’t something they were interested in measuring at first in the “They Can Talk” study. But now, that’s changed.

“We know that language helps not just communicate with others, but also helps us categorize; and it also gives us some sense of consistency and continuity over time,” Rossano said. In other words, self-awareness and language could be connected, as

Rossano said a new, key interest of his study is whether or not dogs have a sense of

Research contact: @Salon

What’s the skinny? Gen Z says boyfriend jeans are in; tight jeans are out

Febraury 16, 2021

A generational war has been playing out on TikTok for some time, although anyone over the age of 24 might be oblivious to the millions of “Millennial vs. Gen Z” videos that have appeared on the social media site in the past year, The Guardian reports.

But now the kids—also known as Zoomers—have turned their sights on something that Millennials apparently hold close—maybe too close: skinny jeans.

In scenes reminiscent of the OK Boomer meme that divided the generations in 2019, the videos are shining a light on how those in Generation Z—broadly defined as anyone born between the mid-90s and 2010—identify themselves in contrast with the generation(s) that came before them.

Since January, there have been 274,000 videos tagged “no skinny jeans” on TikTok and 8.3 million millennial v Gen Z videos. Earlier in the month the male supermodel Luka Sabbat told Esquire: “Skinny jeans don’t look as flattering nowadays.”

Indeed, a video made by TikTok user @momohkd instructs her 410,000 viewers to throw their skinny jeans away, set them alight, or cut them into something new. Like other users she says Millennials should stop wearing them to look youngerthe Guardian notes.

Skinny jeans became mainstream in 2005 after featuring in the Dior Homme autumn/winter collection, as overseen by Hedi Slimane. The size of the jeans—27 inches—was considered tiny—especially in contrast to the price tag: about £200 (US$238).

“Slimane’s skinny jeans were significant for their cut, but also for the bodies he showed them on —incredibly skinny bodies, both of male and female models,” says Emma McClendon, the author of Denim: Fashion’s Frontier. “This changed the marketing and styling of jeans advertisements away from the more sensual look that had dominated the market for bootcut, low-rise jeans to a more androgynous and impossibly thin figure.”

The skinny jean became part of the 2000s boho look of It-girls such as Paris Hilton, Lindsay Lohan, and Nicole Richie (as styled by Rachel Zoe); as well as a part of the alternative rock boom of the era, as seen on bands including the Strokes and Razorlight.

But, the Guardian reports, they never really went away: FLOTUS Jill Biden recently wore a pair on Instagram and they also became a distinguishing feature on the four lads in jeans meme.

What’s changing? There has been an increased focus on body inclusivity in fashion in recent years. In September Versace cast three plus-size models for the first time, and the plus-size model Paloma Elsesser was on the cover of U.S. Vogue in January..

On TikTok, Gen Z users have advocated for baggy jeans instead of slim-fit—eschewing the prescribed idea that thinness is attainable. According to market research company Edited, sales of men’s relaxed-fit jeans have increased by 15% and women’s wide-legged jeans are up 97%. The skinny v baggy online debate not only exposes a generational divide but other socioeconomic truths, too. “This is about issues of ‘taste’ but they intersect with issues of class, age, location, gender,” says McClendon.

The skinny jean, however, may prove hard to get rid of. Last month, Levi’s CEO Chip Bergh told investors he did not “think skinny jeans are ever going away on the women’s side of the business”, despite a clear trend towards “casual, looser-fitting clothes in general”, according to Business Insider.

McClendon added that they “always have a way of bouncing back. They are an extremely versatile and adaptable garment that carry such a multitude of cultural meanings that they will never be irrelevant.”

 Research contact: @guardian