Posts tagged with "The New York Post"

No joke: Scientists believe cannabis might help block and treat coronavirus

May 25, 2020

Okay, we can’t resist it: A team of Canadian scientists has ‘high hopes.” They believe they have found strong strains of cannabis that could help prevent or treat novel coronavirus infections, The New York Post reports.

Researchers from the University of Lethbridge say that a study they conducted in April showed at least 13 cannabis plants were high in a form of CBD that appeared to affect the ACE2 pathways—which are gateways to cells—that the virus uses to access the body.

“We were totally stunned at first, and then we were really happy,” one of the researchers, Olga Kovalchuktold CTV News on April 21. Indeed, she and her husband, Igor—both of whom have been working with cannabis since 2015—believe that, while clinical trials still need to be done, the data they have collected show promise that some cannabis extracts may be used to effectively block and address the symptoms of COVID-19.

The results, posted in the online journal, Preprints, indicate that hemp extracts high in CBD may help block proteins that provide a “gateway” for COVID-19 to enter host cells.

Igor Kovalchuck is optimistic that the forms of cannabis that he and Olga have identified will be able to reduce the virus’ entry points by as much as 70%. “Therefore, you have more chance to fight it,” he told CTV.

“Our work could have a huge influence—there aren’t many drugs that have the potential of reducing infection by 70% to 80%,” he told the Calgary Herald.

Cannabis even could be used to “develop easy-to-use preventative treatments in the form of mouthwash and throat gargle products,” the study suggested, with a “potential to decrease viral entry” through the mouth.

“The key thing is not that any cannabis you would pick up at the store will do the trick,” Olga told CTV, with the study suggesting just a handful of more than 800 varieties of sativa seemed to help.

All were high in anti-inflammatory CBD—but low in THC, the part that produces the cannabis high.

The study, which has yet to be peer-reviewed, was carried out in partnership with Pathway Rx, a cannabis therapy research company; and Swysh, a cannabinoid-based research company.

The researchers are seeking funding to continue their efforts to support scientific initiatives to address COVID-19.

“While our most effective extracts require further large-scale validation, our study is crucial for the future analysis of the effects of medical cannabis on COVID-19,” the research said.

“Given the current dire and rapidly evolving epidemiological situation, every possible therapeutic opportunity and avenue must be considered.”

Research contact: @nypost

The Vend at New York City’s 30 Rock offers kimchi, an engagement ring, jade face rollers, and emergency socks

September 6, 2019

If you want to buy a jar of kimchi, an RBG action figure, an engagement ring, a chicken pesto sandwich, and a shaving kit at the same place at the same time, that’s now possible at a new storefront in New York City’s Rockefeller Center.

Located in 30 Rock’s downstairs concourse, The Vend has been created by Tishman Speyer, a major player in the real estate industry and the owner of the famed center.

The store has six self-service vending machines—open 24/7—that carry everything you might need in a pinch, such as jade face rollers, emergency socks, and Brooks Brothers dress shirts.

“It’s a very modern twist on the classic, old school New York automat—the place where you’d go to get all the essential things you needed,” Tishman Speyer Managing Director EB Kelly told News 4/NBC Miami.

The machines are divided into several categories: joy, savory, sundries, sweets, and drinks.

In a city that never sleeps, you can get a yellow rose diamond ring from Fitzgerald Jewelry of Williamsburg (Brooklyn) any time day or night, in case you wanted to spontaneously pop the question. The machines also have Polaroid cameras for you to document the occasion.

On a recent afternoon, several New York City shoppers stopped by to check out The Vend. One of them appeared to be concerned about the freshness of the refrigerated food, according to a report by The New York Post.

“Seared tuna from a vending machine,” said David Lepelstat, who works nearby, scrutinizing a packaged lunch dish priced at $13.95. “That chocolate cookie looks safer to me.”

A Vend associate said the fresh fare from Proper Food — which includes gourmet salads and sandwiches—is delivered every morning and donated to charity at night if it’s not sold.

Shoppers have been weighing in on what else they want stocked, the associate confirmed. They want “more energy drinks,” she told The Post. And “phone chargers.”

Research contact: @NBCNews

Newsprint tariffs hit U.S. media hard

August 10, 2018

The Trump administration is hitting the nation’s “fake news” publishers where it hurts, even as it continues a simmering trade war with its closest ally, Canada.

On August 2, the Department of Commerce announced that it would proceed with somewhat lower tariffs on Canadian newsprint, a blow to an already-flailing (and failing) U.S. newspaper industry. Indeed, the administration’s decision to impose these tariffs is leading to the demise of local newspapers—forcing already-struggling publications to cut staff, reduce the number of days they print; and, in at least one case, close their doors entirely, according to an August 8 report by The New York Times.

Papers throughout the country already are feeling the effects of the tariffs, the Times said. At least a dozen newspapers across the country have cut publication days, and one newspaper, The Jackson County Times-Journal in Ohio, shut down, citing declining print readership and the tariffs.

An August 3 story by The New York Post, revealed that the tariffs originally imposed by America in May had added up to 30% to the price of newsprint imported from Canada. The latest tariffs range from 8% to 20%.

In reaction to the revision, the trade group News Media Alliance stated that it “doesn’t solve [the] underlying problem.”

Specifically, President and CEO of the alliance David Chavern released comments noting, “While we appreciate the hard work the Commerce Department has put into this investigation and that the margins have been reduced, we believe the final determination does not solve the underlying problem. These taxes on Canadian imports for newsprint, which have been collected during in the preliminary phase, have already caused job losses at newspapers across the country and resulted in less quality news and information being distributed in local communities.’

Others in the industry agreed. “We appreciate Commerce’s slight reduction in tariffs; however, commercial printing companies, book printers, suppliers, and consumers will still pay a price with increased costs and less business, which will hurt our member companies, their employees, and ultimately U.S. newsprint manufacturers. We hope the International Trade Commission will reverse this tax on paper,” said Michael Makin, president and CEO, Printing Industries of America.

“It’s a step in the right direction, but these tariffs are still causing damage and need to be repealed to protect newspapers,” said Paul Boyle, head of Stop Tariffs on Printers & Publishers (STOPP). Newsprint, the second biggest cost to publishers after workers, is now close to $800 a metric ton, said Boyle.

According to the Times report, surging newsprint costs are beginning to hurt publications like The Gazette in Janesville, Wisconsin, the hometown paper of the Speaker of the House Paul D. Ryan (R-Wisconsin). The paper, with a newsroom staff of 22, was the first to publish the news in 2016 that Mr. Ryan would support the presidential candidacy of Donald J. Trump. And while its editorial board has endorsed Mr. Ryan countless times, the paper made national news when it chided him for refusing to hold town halls with his constituents. Now, with newsprint tariffs increasing annual printing costs by $740,000, the Gazette has made several cuts to its staff and is using narrower paper—thereby, reducing the number of stories published every day.

We’re all paying a huge price,” Skip Bliss, the publisher of the Gazette, said of the tariffs’ effect on the industry. “I fear it’s going to be a very difficult time. I

As with Mr. Trump’s other tariffs on steel, aluminum, solar panels and washing machines, the newsprint duties will help some American manufacturers but hurt many other domestic  companies, the Times reported.

A study conducted by Charles River Associates on behalf of a coalition of printers, publishers and paper suppliers projects that American newsprint prices will increase more than 30% within the next one to two years, and that newspapers and printers will face an increased cost of roughly half a billion dollars from the remaining five American mills producing newsprint.

Research contact: sgarnett@crai.com