Posts tagged with "Technology design"

People with dyslexia have the skills to future-proof the workforce, research claims

October 15, 2019

Companies can future-proof their workforces by employing people with dyslexia, new research has claimed, according to a report by CNBC.

In a report published Monday, the British consultancy division of Ernst & Young, EY, used data from the World Economic Forum (WEF) and Made By Dyslexia—the latter, a global charity led by successful dyslexics—to outline how such people’s skills aligned with the competencies that would be required in the workplaces of the future.

What exactly is dyslexia? The Mayo Clinic describes it as “a learning disorder that involves difficult reading due to problems identify speech sounds and learning how they relate to letters and words (decoding).” Most dyslexics have above-average intelligence and social aptitude—and, therefore, are able to hide their reading and pronunciation problems without detection in many cases.

Referencing the WEF’s prediction of which skills would be the most in-demand by 2022, EY’s report highlighted how certain capabilities were becoming more and less useful to employers amid the rise of automation.

The need for processing and manual capabilities like time management, reading, mathematical calculations, and active listening were on the decline, according to the report, CNBC notes.

Meanwhile, creative and social skills such as leadership, analytical thinking and technology design—all of which are common in dyslexics—were increasingly in demand.

The report’s authors also highlighted a slew of capabilities and skills typically seen in people with dyslexia that would be vital to all industries by the year 2022.

“Overall, our analysis shows that competencies for a significant number of jobs in the workplace that dyslexic individuals may typically find challenging will largely be impacted by forms of automation,” the report’s authors said.

“In their place, enhanced tasks and new jobs will be created that match closely to the strengths of dyslexic thinking. Dyslexia could provide an opportunity for organizations to bridge the skills gap of the future.”

Earlier this month, CNBC reports, billionaire Sir Richard Branson credited dyslexia for some of his success as an entrepreneur, noting that people with the condition possessed the “skills of the future.”

“My dyslexia has shaped Virgin right from the very beginning and imagination has been the key to many of our successes,” he said in a blog post. “It helped me think big but keep our messages simple. The business world often gets caught up in facts and figures—and while the details and data are important, the ability to dream, conceptualize and innovate is what sets the successful and the unsuccessful apart.”

Research contact: @CNBC