Posts tagged with "SWNS Digital"

Study: 55% of men are ashamed of their body hair

July 22, 2019

It’s masculine, it’s sexy … it’s embarrassing. While women may like a little chest hair, back hair, or facial hair on their partners’ bodies, over half of men admit to feeling flustered by their body hair, new research has found.

The fascinating statistic emerged in a survey of 2,000 men—conducted by OnePoll on behalf of BAKblade and posted by SWNS Digital— which found that 55% of all respondents said they felt ashamed of their body hair, with 20% saying they feel this way “often.”

Indeed, OnePoll found, many men are chagrined by their chest hair (40%) and back hair (35%). And this feeling of embarrassment may stop them from participating in certain activities. For example, nearly one-third of men surveyed (31%) said they’ve avoided swimming, while another one in four (27%) said they’ve avoided the gym.

Even worse, about 20% believe that their body hair has had a negative impact on their sex lives.

But, even with all of this humiliation, fully 44% of men aren’t doing anything about it, because they consider it “unmanly” for men to practice good grooming habits.

“When most men think of having better ‘grooming habits’ they often think of going into a salon and waiting for their name to be called for their waxing session. Who wants that? BAKblade strives to ‘keep it in the bathroom’ and allow men to manage the issues themselves,” said Matt Dryfhout, CEO and founder of BAKblade, in Chicago. “Our back and body shavers allow men to continue to feel ‘manly’ and keep their dignity while managing the problem in the privacy of their homes.”

The survey also found that men also aren’t too keen on shaving anything but their face, with 62% saying they’ve never shaved their back, and 53% saying they’ve never shaved their legs. Over half of men (56%) also agree that men should only shave their face.

However, the study found that men are definitely curious, as 43% of those surveyed said they’ve secretly used a partner’s grooming product, whether it’s a moisturizer, or a face wash.

 “While men, overall, are getting more curious in the area of grooming, it is the Millennials [who] are showing the most curiosity,” continued Dryfhout. “The biggest hurdle has been showing men options available to them while at the same time letting them know how easy it can be. ”

Research contact: @BaKbladeshaver

Call Dad on Father’s Day!

June 17, 2019

Looking for that last-minute Father’s Day gift? Just don’t forget to pick up the phone. The number-one present that 2,000 U.S. dads said in a recent survey that they wanted for their big day is a phone call from their kid(s), SWNS Digital reports. Fully 47% said they wanted to hear from children and grandchildren—literally.

The new survey, conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Omaha Steaks, found that 57% percent of dads actually admitted that the third Sunday in June is their favorite day of the year.

After the phone call, most Dads thought that a good meal would make them happy. Four in ten American fathers (41%) said a big juicy steak would make their day this year (no surprise, when the survey is by Omaha Steaks!).

In fact, 79% of dads say they like to bond with their children over food. But if it’s a cook-out you’re after, stay off the grill, because one in three dads say that if someone is grilling, it’s gonna be them.

Another no-brainer: Fully 38% said they could really just go with some peace and quiet.

Taking in a ball game with the family also scored high, with another 38% saying that sounded like a lovely Father’s Day treat. And slightly fewer (33%) said they just want to be able to watch what they like on TV.

Finally, when it comes to physical gifts, go light on the ties and socks—and abolish anything imprinted with “World’s Favorite Dad.” In fact, 64% of survey respondents said they never wanted to see anything with those three words again.

Research contact: @OmahaSteaks

Survey: 40% ‘dread’ staying away from home overnight because they will lose sleep

March 13, 2019

Whether it’s a hotel, or a friend’s home, 40% of respondents to a recent survey by sleep tech company Simba say they dread overnight invitations because they never get a good night’s sleep in a bed which isn’t their own, SWNS Digital reports.

The London-based brand, which describes its product as “Europe’s favorite mattress in a box,” polled 2,000 Brits and found that they have a host of worries about staying away from home overnight-among them:

  • Loss of a good night’s sleep (28%);
  • “Getting in the way” when staying at a friend’s home;
  • Sleeping on a terrible mattress (20%);
  • Waking up early and not knowing what to do with themselves; and
  • Being too cold or too hot.

Steve Reid, CEO Simba, which commissioned the study to mark the launch of the company’s new Hybrid Topper said: “A great stay with friends is a fragile thing, easily disrupted by the smallest … failure of etiquette, or even a poor night’s sleep.

“Many of our anxieties regarding staying over with friends stem from worrying about sleeping arrangements, and it should be important to host’s that their guests sleep with comfort and support, to ensure they wake up on the right side.”

Fully 73% of respondents could recall getting poor night’s sleep while staying in an uncomfortable guest bed. In true British style, however, 54% of them have fibbed to their hosts and said they had a great night’s rest to avoid upsetting them.

What’s more, fully 52% think the type of sleep they get while staying away from their own bed is of lower quality.

By contrast, Brits’ favorite thing about staying the night as a guest is getting to see their host, followed by the sense of adventure they get from being away from home. And one in 10 just like taking a break from looking after themselves and being waited on by one of their friends.

Research contact: @SimbaSleep

These are the actresses whom Americans want to see as their movie mothers

May 10, 2019

With Mother’s Day just around the corner, OnePoll has fielded a survey on behalf of Groupon—asking 2,000 Americans whom they think would best represent their mother on the big screen. And the top choice is Meryl Streep, an actress who has portrayed mothers in many of her most popular movies, from Kramer Vs. Kramer to Sophie’s Choice to Heartburn to Mama Mia: Here We Go Again, reports SWNS Digital.

The full top 10 list of actresses and celebrities whom we like to see as moms goes as follows:

  1. Meryl Streep
  2. Sally Field
  3. Julia Roberts
  4. Jennifer Lopez
  5. Angelina Jolie
  6. Oprah Winfrey
  7. Jennifer Anniston
  8. Michelle Obama
  9. Melissa McCarthy
  10. Queen Latifah

Results also revealed what people know most — and least— about their mothers’ life stories.

It turns out, Americans are confident that  they know where their mom grew up (74%), where she went to high school or college (60%), the street she grew up on (50%), her first job (49%), and her genealogy/ancestry (48%).

When it comes to what Americans know least about their mom’s past, it’s the more subtle things such as how many pets she had as a kid, former partner(s), her favorite subject in school, her hobbies as a kid, and what she wanted to be when she grew up.

While 89% of those surveyed said they know a great deal about their mom’s life, that doesn’t mean they aren’t eager to learn more. Fully 72% of respondents revealed they want to know even more than they already do about their mom.

“Mother’s Day is the perfect opportunity to not only celebrate what your mom has done for you, but what she’s done throughout her entire life,” said Groupon President of North America Aaron Cooper, adding,  “While most of us feel like we know everything we possibly can about our mom, these results show that there’s a strong appetite to learn even more about her life story and the passions that drive her interests.”

In addition, fewer than half of survey respondents knew their mom’s favorite food (45% ), flower (37%), song (30%), movie (29%), clothing store (28%), travel destination (23%), actor/actress (21%), or alcoholic drink (21%).

But that doesn’t mean Americans don’t have opinions about what they think their mom was like before they were born. Nearly one-quarter (24% think their mom had better style when she was their age.

And when it comes to the character traits that people reportedly got from their mom, compassion topped the list—with nearly half (49%) admitting to getting this quality from their mom.

Other character traits that people think they got from their mom include sensitivity (44%), work ethic (40%), sense of humor (37%) and good looks (35%).

Research contact: @Groupon

Comfort zone: The average lifespan of the American couch

May 1, 2019

Whether you rate yourself as a “couch potato” or not, few pieces of furniture in your home will ever get more use from family, friends, and pets than the living room sofa, based on a survey of 2,000 Americans conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Rove Concepts, a furniture design and production firm based in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

The average American couch is six years old, holds $1.55 in change, and has been cried on 17 times—based on results of the research, SWNS Digital reported on April 29.

What’s more, America’s typical couch has been napped on 36 times, played host to 32 conversations with family and friends, and supported us through 21 sick days so far, according to results.

While 70% of Americans rate their couch as comfortable enough overall, more than 20% said their couch is faded; and 34% said it’s on their replacement wish list. Indeed, 11% of respondents said their couch was the oldest piece of furniture in the household—outlived only by the bedroom dresser (12%).

Most admitted that they had not replaced any furniture in nearly three years. Sadly, fewer than half (44%) of respondents were “house proud,”  with 10%  going so far as to say they are embarrassed by the appearance of their home.

A spokesperson for Rove said: “The furniture you select [is] a reflection of how you want to feel in your living space. These pieces become a part of the everyday moments that truly make a living space your home.”

Research contact: @RoveConcepts

Life’s ‘greatest small victory’: Finding money in a coat pocket

September 19, 2018

Whether it’s “pennies from heaven” or a true windfall, one of life’s greatest small victories is finding cash in a long-unworn coat pocket, according to results of a study conducted on behalf of the online casino Casumo.com by OnePoll.

Other mood-boosters include receiving an unexpected discount at the checkout counter and spotting loose change on the street, according to a report on the study posted by SWNS Digital.

Greg Tatton-Brown, a marketing and management consultant based in London, commented on behalf of Casumo, “There’s something completely untainted about finding an extra fiver in a coat you haven’t worn in a long time, and it feels right that the experience was named the ultimate little victory in life.

In fact, any opportunity where our finances receive an unexpected boost, however minor, appears to be a key factor in brightening up our day when we need it,” Tatton-Brown said.

A list of the top 20 little victories we all celebrate, compiled by the researchers, includes the following:

  1. Finding money in a coat pocket;
  2. Learning at the checkout counter that your purchase is on sale;
  3. Finding money on the floor;
  4. Getting good weather for a special event;
  5. When a delivery scheduled between 8 m. and 5 p.m. arrives at 8.01 a.m.;
  6. Not needing any work done at the dentist;
  7. Receiving an unexpected tax refund;
  8. When you arrive in a full parking lot just as someone is leaving a space;
  9. Being upgraded to first class;
  10. Getting in a line at the front just before loads of other people arrive;
  11. Someone leaving a table in a busy pub just as you get there;
  12. Getting home just as the postman was about to leave a ‘Sorry we missed you’ card;
  13. Finding a parking space right outside the shop you are going into;
  14. Coming into the house just as it starts raining;
  15. Getting to the bus stop just as it arrives;
  16. When a social event you really don’t want to attend gets cancelled;
  17. Getting two chocolate bars instead of one from the vending machine;
  18. Hitting all the green lights on the way into work;
  19. Getting the last of something on offer in a supermarket; or
  20. Waking up in the night and realizing you still have hours left in bed before you have to get up.

Indeed, fully 74% of respondents think that a little win has the power to rescue a bad day from disaster and give them a sunnier perspective on things. One-quarter of survey participants said they are most likely to encounter a win at home, and only 5% of workers think they are most likely to score a little victory at work.

One in five also admit that they write a smug post on social media to publicly share their little win, no matter how small. Conversely, 37% get a little boost hearing about other people’s victories, and 48% say they do their best each day to make sure people they know get the little wins they need.

Tatton-Brown added: “They are innocuous in most cases, and often barely worth bringing up in conversation, but there is still a small and personal joy in getting a little win when things might not be going your way.

“Whether it’s spotting a lucky penny on the ground, landing a lucky win on an online game, or even swinging your car into a parking space flawlessly, life is full of little victories.

Research contact: grant.bailey@swns.com

Losing their lunch: America’s workers can’t catch a break

September 4, 2018

More than half (51%) of America’s workers say that “it is rare or unrealistic” for them to take a proper lunch break away from their desks or job sites, based on findings of a survey conducted on behalf of Eggland’s Best by OnePoll and posted on August 30 by SWNS Digital.

The poll of 2,000 American workers asked them to reveal their lunch and snacking habits—and found that job stress and the pressure to deliver on high workloads is taking its toll.

That might explain why America’s modern office workers are now more likely to eat at their desks at than any other location, according to the data.

Fully 30% of respondents said that productivity is the biggest reason to stay close to the computer while supposedly taking a break. A lack of time and a perception that there is always too much work to be done also made the top five reasons to eat lunch at your desk each day.

The study found that a very focused 49% of workers—especially those 18 to 44 years of age— say they believe that lunch can be a distraction from getting work done; however those over the age of 45 disagreed.

With a lot of work and little time in the day for themselves, the results indicated that eating habits are changing to suit such hectic routines, with an emphasis on snacking prioritized over lengthy meals.

With few workers receiving a full lunch hour, the survey found that 68% of American workers snack twice a day, and three in ten workers enjoy snacking three times a day. They identified “health snacks” as the following: fruit, nuts and seeds, Vegetable sticks, yogurt, granola, hard-boiled eggs, cheese, humus or nut/seed butter, and pretzels.

In fact, 44% of Americans even have a “snack drawer” at work dedicated to little bites to keep them going throughout the day. Who is most likely to appreciate the office snack drawer? The majority are Millennials and those who hold a traditional 9 to 5 office job.

“As the workplace shifts, so does the traditional lunch hour. With the average lunch ‘hour’ now likely to be 30 minutes or less, American workers are now snacking at least twice a day, not surprisingly between breakfast and lunch, and then when hunger strikes again between 2 p.m. and 3 p.m.,” stated a Kimberly Murphy, director of New Ventures and Innovation at Eggland’s Best.

Where do workers stock up on snacks? They are most likely to get snacks from the grocery store (60%); followed by bringing in homemade snacks (37%), or raiding the vending machine (25 %). And while most of America tends to grab sweet snacks, American workers in the Midwest crave salty instead!

Research contact: usnews@swns.com

Americans have had it with two-step verification

July 10, 2018

Secure or simple? Millions of Americans are fed up with overly complicated web and phone security measures, based on findings of a poll released on July 9 by data analytics firm FICO.

The researchers, who polled 2,000 U.S. adults, report that 81% of respondents don’t see the need for what they consider unnecessary safety methods, according to a story posted on SWNS Digital. In fact, nearly one-half (47%) are sick of having to answer endless security questions whenever they call customer service departments. And over six in 10 (64%) are riled by the need for elaborate passwords featuring a mix of numbers, symbols and capital letters. Indeed, 78% said they struggle to keep track of all their passwords.

Forty-eight percent are fed up with the use of two-step verification and seven in 10 (71%) are frustrated by CAPTCHA codes —because, they say, the codes tend to feature illegible words.a

All in all,  more than two-thirds (71%) think there just are too many security measures nowadays.

T.J. Horan, a vice president for Fraud Solutions at FICO, comments, “There’s a real discrepancy here: Consumers are glad their bank{s are] protecting them, but frustrated that the protection is making it harder for them to open accounts and make purchases.

“When it comes to digital transformation, a smooth customer experience is going to be vital. The winners will be the firms that can balance this against the need to stop fraud.”

Interestingly enough, 46% of respondents said they even consider airport security to be an inconvenience and 38% regard mobile phone PINs as a somewhat of a hassle.

And perhaps it’s no wonder, as those polled have 34 different online accounts on average—including email accounts, shopping accounts, social media accounts, bank accounts, and more.

Finally, the security measures associated with banking appear to be particularly frustrating to those polled—especially when it comes to opening a new account online. Twenty-two percent said they would either give up on opening a bank account
completely, or give up and try at a different bank if they were forced to jump through too many hoops (such as having to post documents or travel to a branch in person)

“This survey shows the conflict between consumers’ desire for greater protection and their desire for easy processes,” said FICO’s Horan.“As we move to more instant transactions, including real-time payments, it’s clear that the industry has a lot of work to do to get this balance right.”

Research contact: greg.jawski@porternovelli.com

Frugal is the new sexy

June 25, 2018

Does your new date lavish you with love, but keep an eye on the budget? He or she may be a keeper. A study of 2,000 Americans conducted by Slickdeals has found that 92% of Americans think “frugal is sexy” and is a highly attractive quality in a potential partner. But somebody who is cheap? Not so much.

The respondents noted that there is a fine line between being cheap and being frugal—and discovering where it is can be tricky. For instance, tipping the minimum on a restaurant bill can often be considered stingy—however, 40% of the survey respondents characterized it as frugal, while 23% called it cheap.

Surprisingly enough, one former dating faux-pas—using a coupon on the first date—is perfectly acceptable to 79% of those who were contacted for the survey. In fact, if you want to impress your date, don’t resort to frivolous overspending, because it’s a total date-destroyer for as many as 66% of Americans studied.

The survey, posted on SWNS Digital on June 22, found that 30 is the average age people really start taking their finances seriously and more responsibly, with 38 being the age at which you reach “peak frugality.”

Conversely, 27 was deemed the age at which people were the most financially reckless. A full 60% of respondents said they had dated someone who was profligate with money, which drove them to seek a life partner who had his or her priorities more in order.

However, if you are smart with money, bringing it up might be a dating no-no: About 25% of respondents said that bragging about money is a huge first date turn-off.

As part of the study, Slickdeals asked respondents to categorize whether the following behaviors were frugal or just cheap. The following were among those things that fell into the cheap category

  • Not leaving a tip (regardless of service):  regarded as cheap by 75% of respondents;
  • Reusing tea bags or coffee filters: 60%;
  • Calculating your part of a group bill to the cent: 52%;
  • Diluting soap bottles with water: 49%;
  • Re-gifting: 44%;
  • Always tipping 15%, even if the service is outstanding: 41%;
  • Eating food a few days past its date of expiration: 35%; and
  • Declining to be a part of rounds at the bar: 35%.

Among those behaviors that respondents identified as frugal are:

  • Keeping outdated or worn out electronics that barely work: 39%;
  • Buying no-name electronics: 51%;
  • Only having alcohol at home: 51%;
  • Watching movies at home instead of in the theater: 61%;
  • Regularly tracking the home thermostat: 62%;
  • Shopping at second-hand clothing stores: 63% and
  • Buying off-brand food products: 65%.

“The increased propensity toward frugality brings to light the importance of value for today’s shoppers,” Slickdeals CEO Josh Meyers said. “Making smart purchase decisions and looking for deals or coupons is becoming mainstream. It’s what savvy consumers do because they are financially wise.”

Research contact: usnews@swns.com

Sibling rivalry still rules on Mother’s Day

May 10, 2018

Mom always liked you best.” If you are old enough, you may recall the catch phrase of The Smothers Brothers, a comedy team who created a wildly popular television show and several chart-topping albums in the 1960s.

Tom’s plaintive remark—always directed at Dick—still resonates today among siblings, as Mother’s Day approaches.

Mother’s Day is this Sunday, and if you are planning to give your Mom something special this year, you probably will want to check in with your siblings first, to see what type of gift they already have wrapped and ready.

It turns out that two-thirds (66%) of Americans touch base with their siblings to see what they are getting for Mom, based on findings of a poll of 2,000 U.S. adults sponsored by Groupon and conducted on their behalf by OnePoll.

However, be careful what you share, because sibling rivalry is at play: Fully 55% will try to get a better present, just to one-up you, according to coverage of this vital issues by SWNS Digital on May 9.

Even when it comes to writing Mom’s card, 30% of grown (and supposedly mature) children will consider what their siblings write in their cards to ensure that they aren’t upstaged in the sentimentality department.

And they are keeping it short and sweet when it comes to what they write: The average American will write 43 words (about two sentences) in a Mother’s Day card.

The study also found that where you fall in terms of sibling order plays a role in how you approach Mother’s Day.

While the average person spends $75, the data showed that it’s the middle child who ends up spending the most on Mom.

Finally, no matter your approach to Mother’s Day, one thing was universal, based on the results: We are really grateful for everything that Mom has done.

Putting food on the table was the number one thing that Americans were most grateful for when it came to their mothers, followed by teaching respect for others, helping to learn manners, showing them how to be kind, doing laundry and exhibiting generosity.

Research contact: jack.peat@swns.com