Posts tagged with "SWNS Digital"

Most Americans say they’re banning unvaccinated family members from holiday gatherings

November 15, 2021

The holidays are about to get heated. Nearly two-thirds of vaccinated Americans have banned unvaccinated family members from their holiday gatherings this year, according to findings of a new poll, reports SWNS.

A survey of 2,000 U.S. residents—conducted by OnePoll on November 2—examined how the COVID-19 vaccine has impacted people’s relationships with their loved ones ahead of the holidays this year.

Based on the results, nearly seven in 10 respondents (67%) said they feel they cannot go home for the holidays without getting vaccinated first. 

Of the 65% who are fully vaccinated, 6 in 10 (58%) have reportedly cut off family members who refuse to get vaccinated, while 63% don’t feel comfortable inviting unvaccinated relatives to their parties.

Seventy-two percent of vaccinated respondents don’t think they could ever get some of these family members to understand the importance of the vaccine.

In fact, 14% of survey respondents don’t plan to ever get the shot themselves.

When asked about their decision, one respondent shared that they “don’t trust the vaccine is safe,” while another said they were “concerned about side effects.”

One even admitted believing the vaccine “was rushed and people who are getting vaccinated are still getting sick.”

Half of unvaccinated respondents (49%) have stopped communicating with family members who don’t understand why they refuse the shot.

These strained family dynamics may explain why 22% of unvaccinated respondents have so far been excluded from all family gatherings, including the holidays.

However, 38% of unvaccinated people said they remain in contact with their vaccinated loved ones, and 58% of the same group added that they’re still welcome at family get-togethers.

Research contact: @SWNS

Top dog: Americans trust their pets’ judgment when it comes to romantic partners

November 12, 2021

Two in every three Americans would end their current romantic relationship, if their pet disapproves, according to new research reported on by SWNS Digital.

In  survey of 2,000 single and dating Americans conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Zesty Paws, researchers found that 68% said their pet has the final say in whom they date.

Indeed, 71% of respondents said they trust their pet’s judgment over their own. Likewise, 68% trust their pets more than their friends and 67% trust them more than their own family.

In the same study, nearly 7 in 10 Americans (69%) said they had dated someone their pet didn’t like. Luckily, 69% of those who have had their pets reject their dates said their pets liked their next partner.

Sixty-seven percent can thank their pet for scoring the first date with a potential partner or their current partner. But if the first date and meeting of the pet doesn’t go well, 68% said there’s no chance of a second date.

Respondents gave varying reasons for their pet’s distaste for their current or ex-partner—including not liking their scent, height, or lack of attention.

The most obvious signs a pet doesn’t like potential partners include not going near them (47%), clawing/biting them (41%), and growling/hissing at them (40%). And if a potential partner is rude towards a pet, 64% of respondents said they could never forgive them

In order to be liked by a pet, respondents said their partner needs to be friendly (44%), give behind-the-ear scratches (40%), and give treats (38%).

Research contact: @SWNS

Hot number: Internet puzzler dares you to find the digits in a huge UK Superdraw lottery

February 5, 2021

The newest puzzle to dumbfound and delight the Internet will make you feel like a real zero if you can’t complete it.

Somewhere in the mind-melting box of 4,400 numbers (posted on this page) is the number 114,000,000—representing £114 million (US$155,765,368)—the figure in a huge upcoming lottery Superdraw being held this week on Friday, February 5.

But it’s fiendishly difficult to discover among the countless nearly-there and not-quite-right numbers littering the grid, reports SWNS Digital.In fact, some have been left scratching their heads for upwards of five minutes trying to track down the difficult digits.

The puzzle was put together by Lottoland.co.uk, whose £114m Millionaire Superdraw prize is available to try and win this Friday. A spokesman said: “On the face of it, this is a simple task—simply spotting the right numbers in the right order.

“But even we were surprised by how difficult it was to find the right thread of figures, and we deal in millions every day. Let’s  hope others have more luck.”

Research contact: @SWNS

The ‘eyes’ have it: How to read facial expressions when they are obscured by a mask

November 24, 2020

In a recent study, commissioned by York, England-based Vision Direct, fully 76 % of Brits struggled to read the moods of others who were wearing protective face coverings—with more than half misinterpreting their conversational partner’s expressions and feelings completely.

Indeed, the survey of 2,000 Brits—conducted on behalf of Vision Direct by OnePoll—found that:

  • More than two-thirds of adults struggle to see how someone is feeling when they have a mask on;
  • More than 60% of adults admit to misunderstanding what someone was saying when they had a mask on, with 42% putting this down to not being able to see their lips.
  • About 70% now are consciously trying to look at people’s eyes to guess what expression they are hiding behind the mask.

Now, UK-based body language expert and TV personality Judi James has revealed her top tips—and not surprisingly, it is all in the eyes, SWNS Digital reports.

James says, “The human animal has always depended on facial expression as a way of social and workplace communication and, over the years, the key focus has been the mouth. We have come to depend on this widening of the lips as a rapport-building social shorthand, which is why the wearing of face masks has caused worries in terms of closing down our ability to communicate.

“The good news,” she notes, “is that our eyes are more than capable of taking over the job of transmitting and reading non-verbal signals, in fact one of the reasons we tend to direct attention to our mouths is that our eyes are such strong (and more honest) conveyors of moods and emotions.”

She indicates a genuine-looking eye-smile should involve some wrinkling at the corners and the rounding of the cheeks.

An “eye-flash”—during which the eyes narrow in the eye-smile but the brows pop up and down again in one rapid movement—can signify that someone is flirting and “likes what they see.”

While a rounding of the eyes suggests shared excitement and those who are in love will have dilated pupils—giving true meaning to the ‘look of love’.

But not all eye-signs are indicators of happy: As James points out, there are tell-tale signs of someone feeling disgusted or angry. To recognize disgust on the face of someone wearing a mask, you should look out for a puckered frown, narrowed eye shape, and a wrinkling of the skin at the bridge of the nose.

Similarly, anger is typically displayed with knitted brows that come as low as possible over the eyes, plus a hard eye-stare with the eyes slightly rounded. The head would be tilted slightly forward too.

What’s more, James cautions that reading other’s eye expressions is important but we also need to be aware of our own. “Our ‘resting’ faces can make us look miserable and unapproachable and without all those mouth shrugs or grins in our repertoire we need to make an active effort to use our eyes to transmit friendly smiles and expressions of empathy.”

Following the findings, Vision Direct has created a quiz to test the nation on its ability to recognize key everyday expressions—via the eyes.

To take the quiz visit www.visiondirect.co.uk/facial-expressions-under-the-face-mask

Research contact: @SWNS

The ‘eyes’ have it: How to read facial expressions when they are obscured by a mask

November 24, 2020

In a recent study, commissioned by York, England-based Vision Direct, fully 76 % of Brits struggled to read the moods of others who were wearing protective face coverings—with more than half misinterpreting their conversational partner’s expressions and feelings completely.

Indeed, the survey of 2,000 Brits—conducted on behalf of Vision Direct by OnePoll—found that:

  • More than two-thirds of adults struggle to see how someone is feeling when they have a mask on;
  • More than 60% of adults admit to misunderstanding what someone was saying when they had a mask on, with 42% putting this down to not being able to see their lips.
  • About 70% now are consciously trying to look at people’s eyes to guess what expression they are hiding behind the mask.

Now, UK-based body language expert and TV personality Judi James has revealed her top tips—and not surprisingly, it is all in the eyes, SWNS Digital reports.

James says, “The human animal has always depended on facial expression as a way of social and workplace communication and, over the years, the key focus has been the mouth. We have come to depend on this widening of the lips as a rapport-building social shorthand, which is why the wearing of face masks has caused worries in terms of closing down our ability to communicate.

“The good news,” she notes, “is that our eyes are more than capable of taking over the job of transmitting and reading non-verbal signals, in fact one of the reasons we tend to direct attention to our mouths is that our eyes are such strong (and more honest) conveyors of moods and emotions.”

She indicates a genuine-looking eye-smile should involve some wrinkling at the corners and the rounding of the cheeks.

An “eye-flash”—during which the eyes narrow in the eye-smile but the brows pop up and down again in one rapid movement— can signify that someone is flirting and “likes what they see.”

While a rounding of the eyes suggests shared excitement and those who are in love will have dilated pupils – giving true meaning to the ‘look of love’.

But not all eye-signs are indicators of happy: As James points out, there are tell-tale signs of someone feeling disgusted or angry. To recognize disgust on the face of someone wearing a mask, you should look out for a puckered frown, narrowed eye shape, and a wrinkling of the skin at the bridge of the nose.

Similarly, anger is typically displayed with knitted brows that come as low as possible over the eyes, plus a hard eye-stare with the eyes slightly rounded. The head would be tilted slightly forward too.

What’s more, James cautions that reading other’s eye expressions is important but we also need to be aware of our own. “Our ‘resting’ faces can make us look miserable and unapproachable and without all those mouth shrugs or grins in our repertoire we need to make an active effort to use our eyes to transmit friendly smiles and expressions of empathy.”

Following the findings, Vision Direct has created a quiz to test the nation on its ability to recognize key everyday expressions—via the eyes.

To take the quiz visit www.visiondirect.co.uk/facial-expressions-under-the-face-mask

Research contact: @SWNS

Study: Most Americans feel ‘pressure’ to work sick

November 11, 2019

It won’t be any surprise to most working stiffs that, no matter how Americans feel on a given day—from hale and hearty to feverish and weak—most will give in to the pressure to show up at the job site.

Indeed, SWNS Digital reports, if you dread taking a sick day, you are far from alone.

Nearly four in five Americans—78%—give in to management expectations “to power through an illness” at the workplace, based on findings of a survey of 2,000 adults (1,930 of them, employed) conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Robitussin.

Compare that with the four in ten Americans (41%) who would prefer to take on extra work than to deal with a sick co-worker. In fact, 83% say they are annoyed if somebody shows up at the office with a cough. However, fully 69% said a bad cough is not a valid reason to take a sick day—and one in three said his or her boss would agree.

Finally, more than one-third of respondents said they actually would be willing to give up vacation time (37%) or social media (36%) for an entire year, if it meant the promise of 12 months without a cough or a cold.

Research contact: @SWNS

Wanted: A ‘canine critic’ to review fido-friendly hotel accommodations

August 14, 2019

A peripatetic pup is wanted to em-BARK on a dream quest— reviewing canine hotels for Hotels.com, SWNS Digital reports. The new position of “canine critic” will give one lucky dog the change to try out ten of the world’s most dog-friendly accommodations.

The top dog will be required to offer his or her four-legged insights on “walkies,” comfy bedding, pampering services— and top quality bones. Together with his or her owner, the hound will post reviews of ten of the world’s reputedly most dog-friendly hotels on a leading hospitality industry website.

And there are just two requirements – they must be a “bone-a-fide” dog and have a taste for international travel.

A recruitment video has been created by the leading hotel provider and features doggie influencer, Dolly Pawton, reviewing The Curtain Hotel in London.

According to research, reviews of pet-friendly hotels have increased by 62% over the past two years.

Following the surge, Hotels.com has launched a new category in its annual Loved by Guests awards – Best for Pets.

Liz Oakman, senior director and general manager-EMEA for the Hotels.com brand said: “We love our pets more than we love our other half at times, so it’s no surprise that we’ve seen a huge increase in travelers wanting to take their furry plus-one on holiday with them.

She added, “At Hotels.com, we want to make sure you find the paw-fect place to check into, so we’re excited to add a Best for Pets category to our Loved by Guests awards —but it doesn’t stop there. Our hunt for a canine critic is our way of ensuring our pet friendly hotels really are up to ‘scratch’ with a four-legged expert’s ‘paw of approval.”

Jet-setting hounds (and their humans) can apply for the role through Hotels.com’s Instagram channel by following them and posting a picture of themselves—tagging @hotelsdotcom and using #CanineCritic. Applications close at 23:59 on Sunday, August 25.

Research contact: @hotelsdotcom

Study: 55% of men are ashamed of their body hair

July 22, 2019

It’s masculine, it’s sexy … it’s embarrassing. While women may like a little chest hair, back hair, or facial hair on their partners’ bodies, over half of men admit to feeling flustered by their body hair, new research has found.

The fascinating statistic emerged in a survey of 2,000 men—conducted by OnePoll on behalf of BAKblade and posted by SWNS Digital— which found that 55% of all respondents said they felt ashamed of their body hair, with 20% saying they feel this way “often.”

Indeed, OnePoll found, many men are chagrined by their chest hair (40%) and back hair (35%). And this feeling of embarrassment may stop them from participating in certain activities. For example, nearly one-third of men surveyed (31%) said they’ve avoided swimming, while another one in four (27%) said they’ve avoided the gym.

Even worse, about 20% believe that their body hair has had a negative impact on their sex lives.

But, even with all of this humiliation, fully 44% of men aren’t doing anything about it, because they consider it “unmanly” for men to practice good grooming habits.

“When most men think of having better ‘grooming habits’ they often think of going into a salon and waiting for their name to be called for their waxing session. Who wants that? BAKblade strives to ‘keep it in the bathroom’ and allow men to manage the issues themselves,” said Matt Dryfhout, CEO and founder of BAKblade, in Chicago. “Our back and body shavers allow men to continue to feel ‘manly’ and keep their dignity while managing the problem in the privacy of their homes.”

The survey also found that men also aren’t too keen on shaving anything but their face, with 62% saying they’ve never shaved their back, and 53% saying they’ve never shaved their legs. Over half of men (56%) also agree that men should only shave their face.

However, the study found that men are definitely curious, as 43% of those surveyed said they’ve secretly used a partner’s grooming product, whether it’s a moisturizer, or a face wash.

 “While men, overall, are getting more curious in the area of grooming, it is the Millennials [who] are showing the most curiosity,” continued Dryfhout. “The biggest hurdle has been showing men options available to them while at the same time letting them know how easy it can be. ”

Research contact: @BaKbladeshaver

Call Dad on Father’s Day!

June 17, 2019

Looking for that last-minute Father’s Day gift? Just don’t forget to pick up the phone. The number-one present that 2,000 U.S. dads said in a recent survey that they wanted for their big day is a phone call from their kid(s), SWNS Digital reports. Fully 47% said they wanted to hear from children and grandchildren—literally.

The new survey, conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Omaha Steaks, found that 57% percent of dads actually admitted that the third Sunday in June is their favorite day of the year.

After the phone call, most Dads thought that a good meal would make them happy. Four in ten American fathers (41%) said a big juicy steak would make their day this year (no surprise, when the survey is by Omaha Steaks!).

In fact, 79% of dads say they like to bond with their children over food. But if it’s a cook-out you’re after, stay off the grill, because one in three dads say that if someone is grilling, it’s gonna be them.

Another no-brainer: Fully 38% said they could really just go with some peace and quiet.

Taking in a ball game with the family also scored high, with another 38% saying that sounded like a lovely Father’s Day treat. And slightly fewer (33%) said they just want to be able to watch what they like on TV.

Finally, when it comes to physical gifts, go light on the ties and socks—and abolish anything imprinted with “World’s Favorite Dad.” In fact, 64% of survey respondents said they never wanted to see anything with those three words again.

Research contact: @OmahaSteaks

Survey: 40% ‘dread’ staying away from home overnight because they will lose sleep

March 13, 2019

Whether it’s a hotel, or a friend’s home, 40% of respondents to a recent survey by sleep tech company Simba say they dread overnight invitations because they never get a good night’s sleep in a bed which isn’t their own, SWNS Digital reports.

The London-based brand, which describes its product as “Europe’s favorite mattress in a box,” polled 2,000 Brits and found that they have a host of worries about staying away from home overnight-among them:

  • Loss of a good night’s sleep (28%);
  • “Getting in the way” when staying at a friend’s home;
  • Sleeping on a terrible mattress (20%);
  • Waking up early and not knowing what to do with themselves; and
  • Being too cold or too hot.

Steve Reid, CEO Simba, which commissioned the study to mark the launch of the company’s new Hybrid Topper said: “A great stay with friends is a fragile thing, easily disrupted by the smallest … failure of etiquette, or even a poor night’s sleep.

“Many of our anxieties regarding staying over with friends stem from worrying about sleeping arrangements, and it should be important to host’s that their guests sleep with comfort and support, to ensure they wake up on the right side.”

Fully 73% of respondents could recall getting poor night’s sleep while staying in an uncomfortable guest bed. In true British style, however, 54% of them have fibbed to their hosts and said they had a great night’s rest to avoid upsetting them.

What’s more, fully 52% think the type of sleep they get while staying away from their own bed is of lower quality.

By contrast, Brits’ favorite thing about staying the night as a guest is getting to see their host, followed by the sense of adventure they get from being away from home. And one in 10 just like taking a break from looking after themselves and being waited on by one of their friends.

Research contact: @SimbaSleep