Posts tagged with "Super Bowl"

How he does it: Tom Brady’s extreme diet and fitness routines

February 9, 2021

On February 7, Tom Brady broke his own record as the oldest QB ever—at age 43—to win a Super Bowl; when his Tampa Bay Buccaneers took on the reigning champs, the Kansas City Chiefs, on the Bucs’ home turf, defeating them 31-9.

According to NBC News, “The game was supposed to be an epic battle of the ages, pitting the all-time great Brady against Patrick Mahomes, 25, widely regarded as the best young quarterback in the game.”

But it obviously didn’t work out that way, as the Buccaneers took a decisive lead in the first half and never lost it.

Suffice it to say, The New York Post reports, “Brady is one of a kind, a phenomenon who shows no sign of slowing down any time soon in a sport where longevity is rare.”

But how does Brady do it? The Post notes that he follows a stringent diet, exercise, and study routine—not only to keep in shape, but to exceed expectations on every level.

Put simply, Brady is an obsessive—a man with a plan and the determination (and money) to execute it, as John Burns, CEO of Brady’s TB12 health and wellness organization, explains.

“Tom’s sustained success over the past 20-plus years is a testament to his incredible drive and his meticulous approach to everything he does.” Burns says. “It’s that mindset that allows him to keep going.”

Here’s how he does it, according to the Post:

Daily schedule

  • 5:30 a.m.:  Wake up, drink electrolyte water and smoothie
  • 7 a.m.: Breakfast with family
  • 8 – 10:30 a.m.: Hit the gym for strengthening and conditioning
  • 10 a.m:  Beach time
  • 11 a.m.:  Review game footage
  • Noon: Lunch
  • 3 -5  p.m.: Team practice or, in the off-season, surf and workout
  • 5-6 p.m.: Post-workout pliability session
  • 6 p.m:  Dinner with family
  • 7 p.m.: Review films, strategy w/ Coach, charity work
  • 7:30 p.m.: Family time, including reading to kids
  • 8:30 p.m.: Lights out and sleep

Fitness

It’s been said that trainer Alex Guerrero knows Tom Brady’s body better than the QB’s wife, Gisele Bündchen. As well as being his business partner in the TB12 health-and-wellness brand—including a chain of fitness centers that they plan to expand nationwide—Guerrero has  been described by Brady as his “body engineer,” the Post says.

He’s micromanaged the athlete’s training schedule month—and even year—in advance. An average day will begin early with a pre-workout “deep force” massage session with Guerrero. It only lasts four minutes, but targets 20 muscle groups for around 20 seconds each. It helps prepare Brady’s body for an intense workout, beginning with 40 minutes of resistance bands, to make muscles more pliable, soft, and resilient.

As the quarterback has aged, he works out less with weights, which could leave him prone to muscle tears. Now it’s all about planks, lunges and squats, followed by more pliability exercises, such as doing crunches with a vibrating roller beneath his back.

After, there’s another massage, this time with the focus of flushing out the lactic acid that builds up during exercise, to help improve muscle recovery time.

During the NFL season, he’ll work out with teammates in the afternoon. Off season, he might get in some surfing. There’s also another pliability session, to improve muscle recovery time, before bed.

Diet

First thing every morning, Brady has a smoothie. His favorite is made with blueberries and banana, hemp and chia seeds, walnuts, almond butter and hemp milk. He’ll also start drinking electrolyte water.

While there’s no denying that Brady’s spartan diet has played a major part in prolonging his playing career, some of his former New England Patriots teammates thought it obsessive and unappetizing — or as one put it, “that birdseed s–t.”

Caffeine is off the table. So is white flour, white sugar, dairy products and anything with gluten. He steers clear of veggies—tomatoes, eggplants, peppers, mushrooms —that could cause inflammation. Everything has to be organic. Brady each day tries to drink “a couple of hundred ounces” of water, usually enhanced with electrolytes. (He sells those, along with various nutritional supplements, through his TB12 site.)

Allen Campbell was Brady’s personal chef from 2013 to 2016; and helped him to create the TB12 Nutrition Manual, published in 2017. He told the Post that, at this time of year, “We focused on dark leafy greens, some grass-fed animal protein as well as legumes and whole grains.”

But that’s not what Brady will eat before the Super Bowl. His game-day meals are even more basic: a smoothie and a sandwich of almond butter and jelly.

It’s all a far cry from his rookie season in 2000; Brady admitted that his pregame snack used to be nachos while his default lunch was ham-and-cheese subs with onion rings and a large orange soda.

Brady sticks to an 80/20 (plant-based/animal protein) diet. Even his favorite ice cream is plant-based; made from avocado with a little cacao mixed in, so it tastes like chocolate.

Mind

Besides having worked with a life coach in the past,   Brady practices transcendental meditation, striving to become what Guerrero has described as “emotionally stable and ­spiritually nourished.”

He’s also had neuroscans so he can better understand the way his brain processes information and create strategies to improve that.

Brady exercises his brain using apps such as BrainHQ. Although the app was designed to help those with brain conditions such as cognitive damage or memory loss, Brady has used it to sharpen his reactions—working his way through two dozen brain games or more each day.

“Tom explained it like this,” said Henry Mahncke, CEO of the app’s creators, Posit Science. “When he gets the [ball], he remembers the play, then he has to scan the field, locate the receivers, figure out which ones are on their routes and which are open, and make the pass. All in about three seconds.”

Sleep

Finally, the Post reports, Brady loves sleeping. Before his first Super Bowl in 2002, he even took a nap in the locker room only to be woken up with just 12 minutes left before the Patriots were due on the field.

These days, he hits the hay at 8:30  each night and wakes at 5:30 a.m. But everything has to be right. From sleeping on a mattress with a layer of diamond memory foam to setting the bedroom thermostat to between 60 degrees and 65 degrees and shutting down all digital distractions at least 30 minutes before he retires, Brady is as obsessive about sleep as he is about, well, everything else in his life.

And then there’s his magic pajamas: bioceramic-infused sleepwear made by Under Armour to increase energy, promote recovery and improve performance. And you can, too, can sleep like Tom, although a complete set will set you back nearly $200.

Research contact: @newyorkpost

Newborns suit up like Chiefs at Kansas City hospital

February 4, 2020

They might have been born yesterday (well, Sunday)—but they already have winning fashion sense: The University of Kansas Health System dressed some infants who arrived in time for the Super Bowl kickoff in tiny Chiefs uniforms—creating a sea of red in the hospital’s neonatal intensive care unit.

“Because we treat them like Chiefs, they dressed the part!” the Kansas City-based hospital posted on Facebook, adding, “In celebration of the upcoming Super Bowl and an impending visit from [official Chiefs Mascot] KC Wolf and Chiefs Ambassador Shawn Barber (and with permission from their parents), our NICU babies were dressed as The Kansas City Chiefs players.”

According to a report by Fox News, the mini Chiefs were photographed wearing tiny wigs and team gear, including jerseys, wristbands, and pompoms. One infant even rocked a Chiefs bow tie.

The adorable photos warmed the hearts of Facebook users, generating 377,000 “likes” on the social media site by Monday.

“Cheers to the Chiefs fighting hard Sunday like these beautiful babies do each day!! Prayers to the families of each and every one of these tiny miracle[s],” one Facebook user commented on the post.

Research contact: @FoxNews

Jay-Z’s Roc Nation launches partnership with NFL

August 15, 2019

Roc Nation,— the entertainment company founded in 2008 by rapper and businessman Shawn “Jay-Z” Carter—announced on August 13 that it was launching a multiyear partnership with the National Football League (NFL) geared to enhance live game experiences and to amplify the league’s social justice efforts.

As part of the agreement, Roc Nation will advise on the selection of artists for major NFL live, on-field performances such as those featured during the Super Bowl halftime break.

According to the league, a major component of the partnership will be to nurture and strengthen community through football and music, including through the NFL’s Inspire Change social justice initiative (which already is supported by eight organizations, including Alliance for Safety and Justice, Anti-Recidivism Coalition, Campaign for Black Male Achievement, Civil Rights Corps, Gideon’s Promise, NAF, Vera Institute of Justice, and VOTE).

The NFL formally launched the Inspire Change initiative in early 2019, after more than two years of work with NFL players, with the goal of creating positive change in communities across the country. Through this initiative, NFL teams and the league office work with the Players Coalition and other NFL players to support programs and initiatives that reduce barriers to opportunity, with a focus on three priority areas: education and economic advancement; police and community relations; and criminal justice reform.

“With its global reach, the National Football League has the platform and opportunity to inspire change across the country,” Jay-Z said. “Roc Nation has shown that entertainment and enacting change are not mutually exclusive ideas. Instead, we unify them. This partnership is an opportunity to strengthen the fabric of communities across America.”

Roc Nation also will work with the NFL to create and distribute content across multiple music streaming services for a variety of initiatives.

“Roc Nation is one of the most globally influential and impactful organizations in entertainment,” said NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell. “The NFL and Roc Nation share a vision of inspiring meaningful social change across our country. We are thrilled to partner with Roc Nation and look forward to making a difference in our communities together.”

Research contact: @NFL

Beer here?

January 21, 2019

What will fans drink at baseball games next summer? Something tells us that fraternity boys are still buying kegs—but overall, Americans are increasingly laying off the booze; especially, the beer.

In response to the growing trend toward nonalcoholic drinks, the world’s biggest brewers and liquor companies are innovating beyond their traditional inventory and rolling out teas, energy drinks, and nonalcoholic spirits, The Wall Street Journal reports.

According to the Journal, new data show that U.S. alcohol volumes dropped 0.8% last year, slightly up from the 0.7% decline in 2017. Beer got hit the hardest, with volumes down 1.5% in 2018, compared with a 1.1% decline in 2017. Growth in wine and spirits slowed, as well, according to data compiled for the news outlet by drinks market analyst IWSR.

The fall in alcohol volumes reflects “a growing trend toward mindful drinking or complete abstinence, particularly among the Millennial cohort,” Brandy Rand, president of IWSR’s U.S. Region told the newspaper. Wine grew by 0.4%, down from 1% the year before; while spirits climbed 1.9%, compared with 2.2% in 2017. IWSR’s figures are based on products shipped.

And speaking of Millennials, could alcohol (and weed) vaping be a factor? While The Wall Street Journal doesn’t cover this game-changer in its report, the vaping industry is now a multi-billion dollar business, with teens and Millennials among the fastest-growing groups of users.  According to recent research by the FDA, over 1.3 million youths are vaping. 2017 saw the largest spike of any substance use in the United States in the past 50 years. E-cigarettes are now at epidemic level of use in the United States.  

In response to the changing marketplace and the growing disinterest in alcoholic drinks, producers are beginning to diversify:  Molson Coors Brewinghas turned to kombucha, Budweiser brewer Anheuser-Busch InBev  sells a spiked coconut water, and Smirnoff maker Diageo wants teetotalers to start mixing cocktails with a pricey, alcohol-free gin alternative, says the Journal.

IWSR forecasts low- and no-alcohol products in the U.S.—still a small slice of the market—to grow 32.1% between 2018 and 2022, triple the category’s growth over the past five years.

Industry executives say drinkers are increasingly concerned about health and that younger generations socialize differently from their parents, drinking less.

“Twenty years ago we didn’t have coffee shops open late, and pubs and bars open for coffee,” Ben Branson, CEO of nonalcoholic distilled spirit maker Seedlip (which is part owned by Diageo) told the news outlet. “People are favoring experiences over ‘let’s go drink on a night out.’”

AB InBev last year created a new global position, head of nonalcoholic beverages, to lead its efforts to diversify. Nonalcoholic drinks—including energy drinks and nonalcoholic beers—already make up more than 10% of the Bud brewer’s volumes. In 2017, it acquired San Francisco-based Hiball, a producer of organic energy drinks.

What’s more, says the Journal, AB InBev recently began selling Budweiser Prohibition brew—a nonalcoholic version of its flagship beer—in Columbus and Detroit. Nonalcoholic beer volumes nationwide. are expected to climb 9.3% over the next five years, according to research firm Euromonitor.

The beer company also has stepped up its efforts to woo consumers defecting to wine and cocktails. Its craft-style breweries in Oregon, California and New York have served as incubators for new, boozy versions of coconut water, matcha tea and agua fresca, a Mexican fruit-juice drink. And the brewer plans to later this month launch a spiked seltzer brand, Bon & Viv, which it will advertise alongside its beers at the Super Bowl.

“People are looking for something that tastes good but also allows them to live well,” Chelsea Phillips, head of marketing for AB InBev’s Beyond Beer division in the U.S., said in an interview with the Journal.

Research contact: saabira.chaudhuri@wsj.com

Americans to munch on 1.35 billion chicken wings during Super Bowl weekend

January 26, 2018

American sports fans will be watching the LII Super Bowl between the Philadelphia Eagles and the New England Patriots on February 4 with “a wing and a prayer.” Indeed, the National Chicken Council released its annual Chicken Wing Report on January 25—projecting that fans will eat 1.35 billion wings during Super Bowl weekend, an all-time high. That figure is up 1.5%, or 20 million wings, from 2017.

To visualize just how many wings that is …

  • If 1.35 billion wings were laid end to end along Interstate 95, they would stretch from Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia to Gillette Stadium in Foxboro, Massachusetts—almost 250 times.
  • That is enough wings to put 625 wings on every seat in all 32 NFL stadiums.
  • 1.35 billion wings is enough to circle the Earth three times.
  • That’s 394 million feet of chicken wings – enough that a chicken could cross the road 13 million times.
  • Americans will eat 20 million more wings this year. If wings were dollars, that would only buy us 2 minutes of commercials during the big game.

“There will be no wing shortage,” said National Chicken Council Spokesperson Tom Super. “Whether you’re a fan of the left wing or the right wing, there’s no debate about America’s favorite Super Bowl food.”

And how do Americans like their wings? More than half (59%) of U.S. adults who eat chicken wings say they typically like to eat their wings with ranch dressing, according to a new National Chicken Council poll conducted online by Harris Poll. Ranch is once again the number-one side or sauce, the poultry organization said. Only 33% like to eat their wings with blue cheese dressing.

Research contact: tsuper@chickenusa.org