Posts tagged with "Snacks"

Kind expands into four new supermarket aisles—including frozen desserts

February 11, 2020

New York City-based Kind, the snack brand—which claims to have created the ubiquitous modern bar category (specifically, to-go bars with easily identifiable ingredientsn 2004, is attempting to extend its success to four new categories, according to a report by Fast Company.

“Since day one, KIND has been obsessed with upholding our brand promise – to create innovative, premium foods that are both healthy and tasty,” Daniel Lubetzky, founder and executive chairman of the 16-year-old company, said in a press release. “While these categories are new for us, each is consistent with how we’ve always entered new categories – with an eye to creatively elevate people’s overall experience.”

Starting this month, you’ll see Kind expanding into four grocery sections:

  • Frozen desserts.Kind Frozen bars are plant-based, creamy frozen treat bars made from nutrient-dense nuts, layered with smooth dark chocolate and nut butter;
  • Treats. Kind Bark comes in dark chocolate flavors with various combinations of nuts.
  • Cold foods. Kind Nut Butter Bar is the company’s first-ever refrigerated, smooth and creamy nut butter protein bar.
  • Kind Clusters mix nuts with seed and fruit clusters, halfway between granola and snack mix.

Jumping into new aisles is a risky, high-failure venture for food brands, but, Fast Company notes, these forays are essential for growth: Kind has hovered around 5% of the bar market for years, facing steep competition from copycats and much larger competitors like Quaker Oats (owned by PepsiCo) and Nature’s Valley (owned by General Mills). The company has previously experimented with expansions into breakfast bars, granola, and fruit snacks.

Along with bitter rival Clif Bar, Kind is one of few still-privately owned ambitious food companies. (Kind received a cash infusion two years ago when Mars, the candy bar and pet food company, took a minority stake, paving the way for today’s category expansions.

Research contact: @FastCompany

No guts, no glory: Mondo snack marketer Mondelēz pivots to take on gut health

March 12, 2019

Chances are that, when you have a “snack attack,” you reach for something from Switzerland-based Mondelēz International—the maker of such popular treats as Oreo cookies, Ritz crackers, Tang flavored drinks, and Toblerone chocolates, among other top brands.

But now, in addition to its tempting goodies, the company has invested in an edible product that actually is good for you.

On March 7, Mondelēz  announced that it had taken a minority investment in Uplift Food, a US-based early-stage start-up focusing on prebiotic functional foods.

This is the first venture investment that the company is making as part of SnackFutures, its innovation and venture hub aimed at unlocking snacking growth opportunities around the world.

“As the global snacking leader, we’re on a clear mission to lead the future of snacking by providing the right snack, for the right moment, made the right way,” commented Mondelēz Executive Vice President and Chief Growth Officer Tim Cofer, adding, “Together with Uplift Food, we have a unique opportunity to disrupt the functional food category by delivering ‘snackable’ products focusing on gut health – something that does not exist today.”

The company believes that consumers are increasingly looking for their snacks to deliver benefits—but options are currently limited. The SnackFutures team will work with Uplift Food to make gut health more understandable, accessible, and enjoyable through new forms and flavors.

Beyond the financial investment, SnackFutures also will provide strategic support in areas such as marketing, distribution, R&D, and sourcing.

Research contact: news@mdlz.com

Losing their lunch: America’s workers can’t catch a break

September 4, 2018

More than half (51%) of America’s workers say that “it is rare or unrealistic” for them to take a proper lunch break away from their desks or job sites, based on findings of a survey conducted on behalf of Eggland’s Best by OnePoll and posted on August 30 by SWNS Digital.

The poll of 2,000 American workers asked them to reveal their lunch and snacking habits—and found that job stress and the pressure to deliver on high workloads is taking its toll.

That might explain why America’s modern office workers are now more likely to eat at their desks at than any other location, according to the data.

Fully 30% of respondents said that productivity is the biggest reason to stay close to the computer while supposedly taking a break. A lack of time and a perception that there is always too much work to be done also made the top five reasons to eat lunch at your desk each day.

The study found that a very focused 49% of workers—especially those 18 to 44 years of age— say they believe that lunch can be a distraction from getting work done; however those over the age of 45 disagreed.

With a lot of work and little time in the day for themselves, the results indicated that eating habits are changing to suit such hectic routines, with an emphasis on snacking prioritized over lengthy meals.

With few workers receiving a full lunch hour, the survey found that 68% of American workers snack twice a day, and three in ten workers enjoy snacking three times a day. They identified “health snacks” as the following: fruit, nuts and seeds, Vegetable sticks, yogurt, granola, hard-boiled eggs, cheese, humus or nut/seed butter, and pretzels.

In fact, 44% of Americans even have a “snack drawer” at work dedicated to little bites to keep them going throughout the day. Who is most likely to appreciate the office snack drawer? The majority are Millennials and those who hold a traditional 9 to 5 office job.

“As the workplace shifts, so does the traditional lunch hour. With the average lunch ‘hour’ now likely to be 30 minutes or less, American workers are now snacking at least twice a day, not surprisingly between breakfast and lunch, and then when hunger strikes again between 2 p.m. and 3 p.m.,” stated a Kimberly Murphy, director of New Ventures and Innovation at Eggland’s Best.

Where do workers stock up on snacks? They are most likely to get snacks from the grocery store (60%); followed by bringing in homemade snacks (37%), or raiding the vending machine (25 %). And while most of America tends to grab sweet snacks, American workers in the Midwest crave salty instead!

Research contact: usnews@swns.com