Posts tagged with "Sales"

Chevy designs 2020 Corvette Stingray Convertible with hard, retractable roof

October 4, 2019

When Prince released his chart-topping song, Little Red Corvette, in 1983, Chevrolet already was gearing up for its 1984 C4 model—which would sell more units (51, 547) than in any year since 1979 (53,807); and would not be topped again.

In fact, just 18,789 Corvette C7 units sold in 2018; and fewer than 10,000 have left dealerships this year so far, according to the website CorvSport.

Now, the automaker intends to revive and expand the cult audience for its sports car with some unique tweaks to its design, Bloomberg reports. The 2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray Convertible, which the company launched on October 2 at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, is the first Vette in history to have a hard, retractable roof, rather than one made of canvas. Chevy is hoping that younger drivers will find the design appealing—creating a whole new generation of loyal buyers.

The hardtop on the new mid-engine Corvette Stingray Convertible folds “seamlessly” into the body, as Bloomberg describes it—maintaining the fighter jet-inspired lines of the coupe version, providing a quieter cabin; and offering the same storage space as the coupe, even with the top down.

That’s 12.6 cubic feet, or enough to stow two sets of golf clubs in the trunk during open-air driving. An additional storage compartment in the front of the car, like those found in Lamborghinis, fits a single, carry-on roller bag and laptop case.

“Our goal from the beginning was to make sure customers didn’t have to sacrifice any functionality, performance, or comfort when choosing the hardtop convertible,” Josh Holder, Corvette program engineering manager, said in a written statement to the business news outlet about the new car.

Indeed, Bloomberg says, by transplanting the engine to the middle of the car, evening out its center of balance, General Motors is positioning it to handle better on the track and take on the likes of Porsche, Ferrari, and Lamborghini.

Pricing on the entry-level 2020 Chevrolet Corvette Coupe starts at $59,995. The starting price on the entry-level convertible is $67,495. Whether car collectors and new fans will be willing to shell out that money for a Chevy rather than a luxury brand is yet to be seen.

Research contact @business

Forgot to pack a warm coat? Try the airport vending machine

November 15, 2018

If you are traveling by air, don’t worry about packing lightly. There’s almost no limit to what you can buy at the airport now, if you find you have forgotten an important item or need something unexpectedly.

Zara Harding had a nagging concern as she walked to her gate after an airport layover last June,” she told The Wall Street Journal for a November 14 story.  She had run out of time to buy a coat for the glacier hike in Washington’s Cascade Mountains she was heading to and was “worrying about being cold in the snow.”

But to her surprise and delight, she found her solution right there at Hollywood Burbank Airport. “Lo and behold,” she says, “a Uniqlo brand vending machine appeared in my path.”

Harding, 39, a group fitness instructor from Northern California, told the business news outlet that she paid $69.90 for an ultra-light down jacket made by the Japanese casual clothing retailer.

Indeed, according to the Journal, the retailer started rolling out vending machines in August 2017 at airports and shopping malls near New York, Houston, Oakland, and seven other U.S. cities—selling basic, travel-friendly attire to customers with no time to browse through the racks or wait on a line.

Although Uniqlo won’t comment on its sales, San Francisco International Airport officials told the New York-based newspaper that the machine there brings in a whopping $10,000 a month.

And according to the Journal, Uniqlo is in the forefront an exponentially expanding number of companies that are using vending machine to sell everything from apparel to makeup, to electronics and high-end foods at hubs nationwide.

The machines can be stationed in unused corners of an airport and make sales around the clock. Some new machines have touch screens and robotic suction arms to deliver expensive products.

“There’s only so many stores you can fit in an airport,” Elias Bizannes, CEO of San Francisco-based ZoomSystems said in an interview. The company operates machines for Uniqlo, as well as Best Buy, Benefit Cosmetics, Nespresso, and Proactiv.

Sarah Skwire, a senior fellow at a think tank in Indiana was on her way to Washington, D.C., when she got a text message that she needed her own makeup for a filming, the Journal reports. At Indianapolis International Airport, she found one of the pink, 59 bus-shaped Benefit machines that are parked at 37 U.S. and Canadian airports.

Before, she says, “I would make sarcastic remarks: Who’s going to blow $40 on Benefit while waiting for a plane, from a vending machine?”

This time, Skwire, 47, bought a travel makeup kit to get herself camera-ready. A few months later, she was back at a Benefit machine after a compact of pressed powder came apart in her bag during a security screening. “I went from a skeptic to a minor enthusiast.”

At some airports, vending machines offer local flavor. Ted Drewes, a St. Louis frozen-custard institution, has been selling $6 “concretes”—custard so thick you can turn it upside down without spilling—from machines at St. Louis Lambert International Airport since mid-2015. Travelers bought 15,000 concretes in the machines’ first year and sales climbed 25% the next year, according to Las Vegas-based AVendCo, which operates the four frozen-custard machines.

At Pittsburgh International Airport, a vending machine operated by Arcadia Publishing sells books on the history of local neighborhoods for about $20.

What’s next? Maybe food or other supplies for all of those companion animals that are catching flights with their owners?

Research contact: @alyrose

The Grammy effect: Sales and streaming soar after awards

January 9, 2018

Collectively, the performers at the music industry’s televised Grammy Awards experienced a 328% gain in song sales in the United States on January 28, the day of the show, according to initial reports from Nielsen Music, released on February 5.

Specifically, the songs performed and the original versions of the songs covered sold 74,000 downloads on Sunday, January 28—up from just 17,000 on the day before the show.

The following day, as music fans returned to their weekly routines, they streamed their favorite songs from the awards show over 9.3 million times—an increase of nearly 2.1 million streams over the day before the show.

On-demand audio streaming for the artists and songs featured during the awards show followed a trend first reported in Nielsen Music’s 2017 Year-End Report, with on-demand audio streaming consumption picking up on Monday, following a Sunday dip. In 2017, Nielsen found that Sundays, compared with every other day of the week, have the lowest average streaming engagement.

Fans celebrated the Bruno Mars hits, “24K Magic” (Record of the Year and Album of the Year) and “That’s What I Like” (Song of the Year),  by streaming them over 1.3 million times through on-demand music services on Monday—a 44% increase, which is 412,000 more audio streams than the day prior to the awards show. “

Finally, there were 41.5 million total interactions across social media—including Facebook, Instagram and Twitter—about the 60th Annual Grammy Awards, as fans posted about the star-studded performances. The top hashtags on Twitter were: #grammys, #grammys2018, #grammy and #timesup.

Research contact:soundscan@nielsen.com