Posts tagged with "Rent the Runway"

Now Moms can ‘Rent the Runway’ for their budding fashionistas

April 8, 2019

Is your child a budding fashionista or influencer? Does she have a unique sense or style? Or are the clothing trends that are popular at your child’s school just too rich for your wallet?

Now, there’s a solution that won’t break your bank account: On March 28, Rent the Runway—an online service that has been successfully offering designer dress and accessory rentals to women since 2009—announced that it has added kids’ items to its website, suitable for Vogue Bambini.

Rent the Runway CEO Jennifer Hyman, who is a mother herself, told Business Insider recently that this was a natural extension of the business. Many of the service’s 11 million members have children, and these women are deciding what their children wear, she said.

Kids are constantly growing out of their clothes, so there is an economic and environmental advantage in not having to buy lots of new clothes. But, it also means that mothers can dress their kids in fancy clothes without worrying about those items being ruined.

“Kids are messy,” Hyman said. “With this launch, you’ll never have to worry about a stain or a spill because Rent the Runway handles everything.”

The new offering will function as an extension of the monthly subscription services Unlimited and Reserve. Members will be able to include kids’ items in the four pieces of clothing or accessories they are able to rent via the unlimited service or add on items for an extra fee.

The brands on offer include Chloe Kids, Fendi Kids, and Stella McCartney Kids, with a mix of special occasion and everyday wear.

“Nothing is off the table for Rent the Runway,” Hyman said when asked about the likelihood of offering menswear or home decor items in the future.

Research contact: @businessinsider

Brits are wearing clothes once, for the ‘hashtag moment,’ before returning them

August 14, 2018

Buying clothes for a special event, tucking in the tags—and then returning them to the store the next day (hopefully, with no noticeable stains or stench)—is a notorious strategy of stingy shoppers. But today, people are doing it just for the social media status.

Indeed, based on findings of a recent poll conducted by payments company Barclaycard, and posted on Quartz, nearly 9% of UK shoppers admit to buying clothing only to take a photo on social media. After the outfit of the day makes it online, they return it to the retailer.

The survey of 2,002 adults showed that shoppers aged 35-44 are the most likely to do this, and, surprisingly enough. men outnumbered women. The study found that it is men who are more  socially self-conscious  than women – with 12%t posting a clothing item on social media and then returning it to an online retailer, compared to only 7% of women

According to Barclaycard, the introduction of “try before you buy” policies at online retailers—where people pay for clothing they ordered online after they’ve tried it on at home—could be contributing to this trend.

One major reason? The rise of social media means that everyone, not just celebrities, is expected to maintain and curate a personal brand. Since we’re constantly documenting our lives and posting them online for public comment, nobody wants to get caught in the same outfit twice.

There are brands that tailor specifically to the Instagram shopper, such as Fashion Nova. “These are clothes made for social media: meant to be worn once, maybe twice, photographed, and discarded,” Allison P. Davis wrote in her deep-dive about the company in New York Magazine’s “The Cut.” Another favorite of the Instagram age is Rent the Runway, which embraces the return philosophy and allows customers to rent designer clothing for a fee.

Some, however, are moving in the opposite direction. The concept of the “capsule wardrobe”—which calls for investing in a small number of high-quality pieces instead of lots of trendy, discardable clothes—also is making a comeback according to a recent report by The Washington Post.

And then there’s British fashion icon Kate Middleton  the Duchess of Cambridge, whose every outfit sells out in seconds, but who frequently wears the same outfit twice (as did former U.S. First Lady Michelle Obama, another trendsetter).

Research contact: Rebecca.butler@barclaycard.co.uk

Jetblack, a Walmart stealth startup, targets affluent urban moms

May 22, 2018

A stealth startup, incubated inside of Walmart, has clandestinely rebranded itself—from Code Eight to Jetblack, Recode reported on May 18.

In job listings, the new division describes itself as a “members-only personal shopping and concierge service that combines the convenience of e-commerce with the customized attention of a personal assistant.”

And soon it will be reborn as a brick-and-mortar enterprise targeted at affluent city women. “Jetblack is currently in beta in Manhattan,” the brand’s current website says. It invites visitors to request early access.

The startup is being led by Rent the Runway co-founder Jenny Fleiss, who joined Walmart last year to helm the initiative. Since then, Walmart has revealed little about the project.

However, Recode has been on the case for awhile. In January, the news outlet reported, “A new Walmart subsidiary, called Code Eight, has recently started testing a personal shopping service for ‘busy NYC moms,’ according to multiple sources, with the goal of letting them get product recommendations and make purchases simply through text messaging.”

The targeted customers of Jetblack are not among Walmart’s traditional base—white, 50-year-old females with annual household incomes of about $53,000.

Indeed, according to an online job listing, Recode reports, the new enterprise is being marketing to the “high net worth urban consumer.”

Household items are delivered for free within 24 hours; other purchases are delivered within two business days. Returns are picked up for free at a customer’s apartment building or house.

In addition, Recode reports, Jetblack is one of several projects being run under a Walmart startup incubator called Store No. 8. Others include Project Kepler, a startup working to build cashierless stores.

Research contact: @DelRey