Posts tagged with "@realdonaldTrump"

Dorsey says Trump is the ‘twit’ for trying to control social media platforms

May 29, 2020

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey doesn’t scare easily—even when confronted by a raging U.S. president who is threatening to sign a vindictive executive order—meant to hobble Dorsey’s ability to monitor his own platform and correct deceptive posts.

Twitter became the target of the president’s fury after the social media site added a disclaimer to two tweets riddled with inaccuracies that were written and posted by @realDonaldTrump on his feed early last week, The Daily Beast reports.

The first reaction of the POTUS, according to the news outlet, was to try to bully the site by threatening to close down social-media companies that he thinks “show bias” against conservatives—and it was reported late Wednesday, May 27, that he planned to sign  an executive order intended to remove important legal protections from sites like Twitter and Facebook.

In a series of tweets, Dorsey wrote that Twitter will “continue to point out incorrect or disputed information about elections globally. And we will admit to and own any mistakes we make.”

He added: “This does not make us an ‘arbiter of truth.’ Our intention is to connect the dots of conflicting statements and show the information in dispute so people can judge for themselves.”

Despite his new intention to fight disinformation, this week Dorsey denied a widower’s request to remove Trump tweets that baselessly suggested Lori Klausutis was murdered in 2001 by her boss, MSNBC host Joe Scarborough.

Research contact: @thedailybeast

Team Trump interrogated EU aides to find out who ‘liked’ a Chelsea Clinton tweet

January 1, 2020

On the evening of July 10, 2017, staffers at the U.S. embassy in Brussels—the official office of the ambassador to the European Union—received an odd call from the seventh floor of the State Department back in Washington, D.C., The Daily Beast reports.

The office of then-Secretary of State Rex Tillerson was irate. Someone in Brussels with access to the mission’s Twitter account had liked the wrong tweet. It had set off alarm bells inside the Beltway.

And it wasn’t just any tweet. It was one written by Chelsea Clinton and sent to @realDonaldTrump in a public spat that soon trended on the Internet.

That week, Trump had drawn criticism for his decision to let his daughter, Ivanka, fill his seat at the G-20 meeting of top economic powers in Hamburg, Germany, The Daily Beast notes.

After days of the pile-on, Trump took to Twitter on the morning of July 10 to claim his decision to have Ivanka represent the United States at the G-20 was “very standard” and that Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany agreed.

However—no more than 15 minutes later—he switched his tone, and began attacking Clinton, as well as the press. Clinton shot back: “It would never have occurred to my mother or my father to ask me. Were you giving our country away? Hoping not.”

Her tweet garnered more than half a million likes—including one from the account for the U.S. mission to the European Union, The Daily Beast reports.

And according to an exclusive report by the news outlet, that single “like” from within the administration kickstarted a weeks-long investigation, prompted by the secretary’s office, into exactly whom at the Brussels mission had access to the Twitter account and had hit “like” on Clinton’s tweet.

At least ten people were interviewed about whether they, as administrators of the account, had mistakenly or deliberately pressed the “like” button. All of them denied it, sources told The Daily Beast.

One individual familiar with the exchanges said the secretary of state’s top managers in Washington “wanted blood” and called Brussels numerous times demanding the name of the culprit.

U.S. officials in Belgium were never able to give Tillerson’s office a name and soon after, the embassy restructured the Twitter account and limited access to just two individuals.

The concern from the secretary’s office over social-media messaging continued after Tillerson and into the era of Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, two U.S. officials at American embassies overseas told the news outlet.

The micromanaging is still causing headaches for staffers and officials at top American outposts who are trying to navigate the task of pleasing both the State Department and the White House simultaneously—a mission that at times requires two completely different strategies, those sources said.

It is unclear if Trump—who is famously thin-skinned about criticism or even mean tweets from prominent critics—himself was aware of this intra-administration kerfuffle over the Clinton tweet, but some of his lieutenants certainly were.

One former aide commented, “[The Chelsea Clinton incident] was another little thing that fueled suspicions  [within the administration] and reminded…officials in the White House that there were a lot of people … who clearly hated Donald Trump.”

However, amid all the paranoia that surface after the exchange, one inescapable truth surfaced: It would hardly be the only time—and it certainly will not be the last—when the State Department bends itself out of shape over anti-Trump activity on Twitter.

Research contact: @thedailybeast

How tweet it is: Trump accuses China of sabotaging diplomacy with North Korea

August 31, 2018

President Donald Trump is playing the blame game again—and this time his target is Beijing. According to a report by The New York Times, on August 29, the POTUS tried to make China the scapegoat for his stalled diplomacy with North Korea—accusing the People’s Republic of undermining the U.S.-led pressure campaign against Pyongyang because of an escalating trade dispute with the United States.

In a series of late-afternoon tweets on @realDonald Trump—sent out under the headline, “Statement from the White House”— the president referred to himself in the third person, claiming, “President Donald J. Trump feels strongly that North Korea is under tremendous pressure from China because of our major trade disputes with the Chinese Government…

“At the same time, we also know that China is providing North Korea with considerable aid, including money, fuel, fertilizer and various other commodities. This is not helpful,” he said.

He continued to tweet, “Nonetheless, the President believes that his relationship with {North Korean leader] Kim Jong Un is a very good and warm one, and there is no reason at this time to be spending large amount of money on joint U.S.-SouthKorea war games. Besides, the president can instantly start the joint exercises again with South Korea and Japan, if  he so chooses.”

He added a threat: “If he does, they will be far bigger than ever before. As for the U.S.-China trade disputes, and other differences, they will be resolved in time by President Trump and China’s great President Xi Jinping. Their relationship and bond remain very strong.”

The news outlet noted that, even as he was criticizing China, Trump reaffirmed his decision in June to suspend joint military exercises with South Korea, saying they were costly and unnecessary, given his warm relationship with North Korea’s leader, Kim Jong-un.

“While it was difficult to decipher the strategy behind the tweets,” the Times said, “the president appeared in part to be trying to dial back remarks made by Defense Secretary James Mattis, who opened the door [on August 29] to resuming the exercises.”

A Defense Department official told the Times that news reports that interpreted Mattis’s remarks as contradictory to the president’s had angered the White House.

Research contact: @MarkLandler 

Trump to Sessions: ‘Stop the rigged witch hunt right now’

August 2, 2018

President Donald Trump is feeling the heat—and it is not environmental. On August 1, he implored Attorney General Jeff Sessions to end the federal investigation into Russia’s interference in the 2016 elections that is being helmed by Special Counsel Robert Mueller.

As usual, the president took to Twitter to make his intentions known. At 9:24 a.m., he tweeted, “This is a terrible situation and Attorney General Jeff Sessions should stop this Rigged Witch Hunt right now, before it continues to stain our country any further. Bob Mueller is totally conflicted, and his 17 Angry Democrats that are doing his dirty work are a disgrace to USA!”

The angry “ask” came after a week in which the POTUS’s probable involvement in a Trump Tower meeting with the Russians in June 2016 grabbed headlines, thanks to a revelation by former Trump lawyer and “fixer” Michael Cohen.

In addition, Trump’s instructions to Sessions were issued on the second day of the Alexandria, Virginia-based federal trial of Paul Manafort, Trump’s former campaign manager. Manafort is accused of bank and tax crimes.

The media quickly characterized his tweet as a form of obstruction of justice. The Washington Post’s Carol Leonnig was prompt to report (also on Twitter) : “NEW: Trump lawyers tell me his tweets this morning are simply “his opinions” and not evidence of an ongoing effort to obstruct the Russia probe. @RudyGiuliani and @JaySekulow call in to explain @realDonaldTrump well-established practice.”

What’s more,  Democratic Congressman Eric Swalwell ( 15th District, California) rapidly tweeted, “Just as a reminder, @realDonaldTrumps tweets are official statements. [Press Secretary] Sarah Sanders might try to spin it now into “opinion,” but Trump is telling his subordinate Jeff Sessions what he wants him to do: stop Mueller’s investigation.”

And progressive organization, MoveOn, commented, “If @real DonaldTrump sabotages #Mueller‘s #TrumpRussia investigation we will need to take swift action. Text ALERT to 668366 & head here: …http://www.trumpisnotabovethelaw.org” 

Presidents typically do not weigh in on ongoing Justice Department investigations, The New York Times said, “but … Trump has been outspoken about his anger and frustration with the Russia investigation, which predates his presidency and was later taken over by …. Mueller.…. Trump has also said that he never would have made … Sessions his attorney general if he knew … Sessions would recuse himself from the Russia inquiry.”

The special counsel is also looking into some of Trump’s tweets about. Sessions and the former FBI Director James Comey —and whether the messages were intended to obstruct justice, the Time said.

A CNN poll conducted by SSRS posted on June 22 found that most Americans continue to believe that the Russian effort to influence the 2016 presidential election is a serious matter that should be investigated, but the constant criticism by President Donald Trump of special counsel Robert Mueller is taking its toll. The number of Americans who approve of how Mueller is handling the investigation has dropped from 48% in March to 44% in May to just 41% [in June], the lowest it has been in CNN’s polling.

Mueller has a lot of company; no one connected with this matter is coming out of it in a positive light. According to CNN, his favorable rating is just 32%; former FBI Director James Comey’s favorability is just 28%; Rudy Giuliani, one of Trump’s lawyers in the Russia investigation, is viewed favorably by only 31% of Americans.

Research contact: @CNNPolitics

Few Americans read Trump’s tweets directly on Twitter

May 21, 2018

While 76% of Americans ultimately hear about @realDonaldTrump’s  tweets and the news they generate, few Americans say they read the POTUS’s tweets unfiltered, directly from Twitter (8%). Instead, most appear to read or learn about them indirectly, through either other social media or the broader news media, based on findings of a poll conducted by Gallup and released on May 16.

Trump views his use of Twitter as a way of sending unfiltered opinions and views directly to the public. In June 2017, Trump tweeted: “The FAKE MSM [mainstream media] is working so hard trying to get me not to use Social Media. They hate that I can get the honest and unfiltered message out.”

However, just 26% of Americans have a Twitter account, and 30% of that group—or 8% of the overall U.S. population— personally follow the president’s official Twitter account.

The corollary of the finding that relatively few Americans read Trump’s tweets directly on Twitter is that most of those who say they see, read or hear a lot or a fair amount about his tweets (69%) are getting their information from a secondary source. Some of their access to his tweets could be relatively straightforward, such as when a friend forwards a tweet or when a tweet is reprinted directly in a publication and the person reads only the tweet. But Americans’ awareness of Trump’s tweets is more commonly the result of an indirect, filtered dissemination.

Interestingly enough, Democrats are more likely than Republicans to say they see, read, or hear a lot about Trump’s tweets (64% vs. 50%, respectively). Democrats also edge out Republicans when including those who read a fair amount of his tweets: 84% of Democrats see, read or hear about at least a fair amount of the president’s tweets, compared with 77% of Republicans (and 71% of independents).

The major difference between Republicans and Democrats is among those following Trump’s tweets without having a Twitter account.

In some ways, then, Twitter functions for Trump much like an old-fashioned press release or press conference statement. Few Americans see or read his tweets directly, but many ultimately hear about them via media coverage or other means.

Research contact: datainquiry@gallup.com