Posts tagged with "Quinnipiac Poll"

If truth be told, a new poll shows Trump’s advanced lying skills are failing him

March 18, 2020

Can Americans recognize a snake oil salesman when they see one? A poll conducted March 13-16 by NPR, PBS News Hour and Marist among 784 U.S. adults has found that far more Americans trust the news media than trust President Donald Trump to tell them the unvarnished  truth about the coronavirus pandemic.

According to a report by The Washington Post, the poll determined that only 37% of Americans have a good deal of trust in the information Trump tells them about coronavirus. By contrast, 60% have little to no trust in what he says.

Meanwhile, the poll also finds that 50% of respondents rely on information they get from the news media about the disease; versus 47%, who lack trust in such sources.

And as Americans continue to wait for the widespread COVID-19 testing that already is available in other countries, 44% of those polled say they approve of Trump’s handling of the crisis, while 49% disapprove of it. Drilling down, 85% of Republicans approve, but only 40% of Independents do.

However, the Post notes, 70% are concerned that coronavirus will spread to their communities—a massive swing from 44% last month, in spite Trump’s efforts to downplay it.

Such findings are supported by a recent Quinnipiac poll, which found that Americans hold Trump’s handling of coronavirus in low regard, while only smallish minorities ascribe to Trump qualities like honesty and leadership.

Research contact: @washingtonpost

Quinnipiac Poll: 75% of U.S. voters want witnesses in Senate impeachment trial

January 29, 2020

On week two of the Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump, three-quarters (75%) of U.S. registered voters believe that witnesses should be allowed to testify in the Senate impeachment trial, according to findings of a Quinnipiac University national poll released on January 28.

According to the pollsters, those who support witness testimony include 49% of Republicans, 95% of Democrats, and 75% of Independents.

“There may be heated debate among lawmakers about whether witnesses should testify at the impeachment trial of President Trump, but it’s a different story outside the Beltway. Three-quarters of American voters say witnesses should be allowed to testify, and that includes nearly half of Republican voters,” said Quinnipiac University Poll Analyst Mary Snow.

On the question of whether President Trump should be removed from office, it’s a closer call: Quinnipiac says voters remain divided, as 48% told the poll that the Senate should not remove President Trump from office; while 47% said the Senate should. That compares to a January 13 poll, conducted prior to the start of the Senate impeachment trial, in which 48% said the president should not be removed from office, while 46% said he should.

Among voters who say President Trump should not be removed from office, 77% believe the president did nothing wrong in his actions involving Ukraine, while 14% say he did something wrong.

Of the overwhelming majority of voters who have an opinion on whether the Senate should vote to remove President Trump or not, Quinnipiac found that 89% say they’ve already made up their minds, while 10% say they might change their minds.

Research contact: @QuinnipiacPoll

Without fanfare, Senate votes to abate tariffs on Chinese goods

July 30, 2018

As trade tensions escalate between the Trump administration and Beijing, the U.S. Senate with little fanfare passed legislation on July 26 that would lower trade barriers on hundreds of items made in China, CNBC reported. A version of that bill already had passed unanimously in the House of Representatives earlier this year.

With no debate, the Senate unanimously passed a bill that would cut or eliminate tariffs on toasters, chemicals—and roughly 1,660 other items made outside the United States, the business news network said. Nearly half of those items are produced in China, based on a Reuters analysis of government records.

The move is meant to neutralize a 25% tariff on up to $50 billion of Chinese goods that Trump announced in mid-June—as well as a subsequent move by China to impose a 25% retaliatory tariff on $34 billion worth of U.S. goods, including agricultural products and U.S.-made cars.

In June, CNN reported that Trump meant his tariffs on Chinese goods to penalize Beijing for stealing American technology and trade secrets. The news network said that the “tariff is targeted towards the Chinese aerospace, robotics, manufacturing and auto industries.”

According to CNBC, the White House has not publicly taken a position on the so-called Miscellaneous Tariff Bill Act of 2018. The Senate and House now need to resolve minor differences before they can send the legislation to President Trump to sign into law.

The National Association of Manufacturers has said U.S. businesses pay $1 million a day on such import duties. In a statement, NAM urged passage of the act, “to eliminate unfair, out-of-date, distortive, and anticompetitive taxes on manufacturers.”

When asked in an April 11 Quinnipiac poll if they would support or oppose “raising tariffs on products imported from China, if it causes China to raise tariffs on American products,” 51% of U.S. adults nationwide said they would oppose the tariffs and 40% said they would support them. There was a partisan divide in the results, with two-thirds of Republicans supporting Trump’s actions.

Research contact: timothy.malloy@quinnipiac.edu

Trump imposes steel, aluminum tariffs on EU, Canada and Mexico

June 1, 2018

The Trump administration will levy onerous steel and aluminum tariffs on its close allies—the European Union, Canada and Mexico—starting today, in a move likely to lead to retaliation and risk the future of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), The Hill reported.

U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said in a conference call with the media on May 31 that—following months of entreaties from the three trading partners—the president had decided to end temporary exemptions.

This is not a step that the American public support, based on results of a recent Quinnipiac Poll. U.S. voters oppose (50% to 31%) tariffs on steel and aluminum, and disagree (64% to 28%) with President Donald Trump’s claim that a trade war would be good for the U.S. and easily won, the researchers found.

Every listed party, gender, education, age and racial group opposes steel and aluminum tariffs, except for the Republicans, who support tariffs by a lackluster 58% to 20%; and white voters with no college degree, who are divided (42% to 40%).

American voters oppose these tariffs (59 % to 29%), Quinnipiac found, if these tariffs raise the cost of the goods they buy. Indeed,American voters disapprove (54% to 34%) of the way in which the POTUS is handling trade.

Ross said on Thursday, “We look forward to continued negotiations with Canada and Mexico on one hand; and with the European Commission on the other hand, as there are other issues we need to get resolved.”

The Commerce Secretary noted that the Trump administration would need to see the reactions of Canada, Mexico and the 28-nation EU bloc before determining what to do next.

But, The Hill reported, he said that U.S. officials are “quite willing and eager” to have further discussions with all of the parties.

The trading partners all had warned America that they intended to impose retaliatory tariffs on U.S. exports, if President Trump made this move.

According to The Hill, the EU is expected to quickly retaliate with promised tariffs of about $3.3 billion on iconic American products such as bourbon, jeans and motorcycles.

Last year, nearly 50% of U.S. steel and aluminum imports came from the EU, Canada and Mexico. Trump first announced tariffs of 25% on steel and 10% on aluminum for national security reasons in March.

Canada and Mexico also have said that tariffs are unacceptable, don’t affect U.S. national security and that their implementation could put the fate of NAFTA at stake.

Research contact: peter.brown@quinnipiac.edu