Posts tagged with "Poisoning"

FDA alert: At least 75 brands of hand sanitizer contain methanol—and may be toxic

July 27, 2020

Federal regulators have recalled dozens of hand sanitizers—many of them, widely available through Walmart, Costco, and other national retailers—because they contain dangerous and potentially fatal levels of wood alcohol (also known as methanol).

Specifically, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has identified at least 75 brands whose labels say they contain ethanol (also known as ethyl alcohol or grain alcohol)—but later proved to contain methanol.

The FDA recommends that consumers should immediately stop using these hand sanitizers and dispose of the bottle in a hazardous waste container, if available, or dispose of as recommended by your local waste management and recycling center. Do not flush or pour these products down the drain or mix with other liquids.

Methanol exposure can result in nausea, vomiting, headache, blurred vision, permanent blindness, seizures, coma, permanent damage to the nervous system or death.

Although people using these products on their hands are at risk for methanol poisoning, young children who accidentally ingest these products and adolescents and adults who drink these products as an alcohol (ethanol) substitute are most at risk. Consumers who have been exposed to hand sanitizer containing methanol and are experiencing symptoms should seek immediate medical treatment for potential reversal of toxic effects of methanol poisoning.

. While methanol-containing hand sanitizers are more life-threatening than others, the FDA urges all consumers not to drink any hand sanitizer product. This is particularly important for young children, especially toddlers, who may be attracted by the pleasant smell or brightly colored bottles. During the pandemic, poison control centers have had an increase in calls about accidental ingestion of hand sanitizer, and it is important that adults keep these products out of reach of children and monitor young children’s use.

Do not use hand sanitizer on pets or allow pets to swallow hand sanitizer. If you believe your pet has eaten something potentially dangerous, call a veterinarian or a pet poison control center immediately.

Consumers are reminded to wash their hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after coughing, sneezing or blowing one’s nose. If soap and water are not readily available, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends consumers use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% ethanol.

The FDA encourages health care professionals, consumers and patients to report adverse events or quality problems experienced with the use of hand sanitizers to FDA’s MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program (please provide the agency with as much information as possible to identify the product):

  • Complete and submit the report online, or
  • Download and complete the form, then submit it via fax at 1-800-FDA-0178.

Consumers, manufacturers or distributors who have questions for the FDA regarding hand sanitizers should email COVID-19-Hand-Sanitizers@fda.hhs.gov.

Research contact: @US_FDA

Accidents are now #3 cause of death in America

January 18, 2018

Are many of us simply an accident statistic waiting to happen? Unintentional, preventable injuries—classified as accidents—claimed a record high 161,374 American lives in 2016, to become the third leading cause of death in the United States (after heart disease and cancer) for the first time ever, according to a report from the National Safety Council released on January 17.

In fact, in America, someone is accidentally injured every second and killed every three minutes by a preventable event.

Highest on the list in 2016, according to the council, were poisoning (58,335 deaths), motor vehicle accidents (40,327), falls (34,673) choking (4,829), drowning (3,786) and fire/flames/smoke (2,730).

Along with other nonspecific accidents, that led to a total of 14,803 more people who died unexpectedly during 2016 than in 2015— a 10% year-over-year increase.

This represents the largest single-year percentage rise since 1936, and the largest two-year rise (+18.6%, for 2015-2016) since 1903.

According to the NSC, the unprecedented spike has been greatly fueled by the opioid crisis. Unintentional opioid overdose deaths totaled 37,814 from drugs—including prescription opioid pain relievers, heroin, and illicitly made fentanyl.

NSC analysis of the data— tracked annually by the National Center for Health Statistics at the Centers for Disease Control— also confirmed the council’s motor vehicle fatality estimate for 2016. Motor vehicle deaths rose 6.8% in 2016 — in step with the NSC’s  original estimate of 40,200 deaths. NSC can now confirm that the final 2016 data marks a 14% increase in roadway deaths since 2014 – the largest two-year jump in 53 years.

“Our complacency results in 442 deaths each day,” said NSC CEO Deborah A.P. Hersman. “For years our country has accepted unintentional injuries as an unavoidable reality. The truth is, there is no such thing as an accident. Every single one of these deaths was preventable. We know what to do to save lives, but collectively we have failed to prioritize safety at work, at home and on the road.”

Preventable deaths have been rising since 2009 after years of declines and plateaus, and they trail only heart disease and cancer when it comes to the number of lives lost annually. Unlike other causes of death, preventable injuries are a threat at every age.

Finally, there is just a bit of good news: We’re safer than we were a century ago: In 1903, the accidental standardized death rate was 99.4 per 100,000 population—twice as high as the current death rate of 47.2. However, the current death rate is 39% higher than the lowest recorded rate, 34.0, achieved in 1992.

Research contact: customerservice@nsc.org