Posts tagged with "OnePoll"

Mama’s boy or daddy’s girl? Half of adults admit they have a favorite parent

July 24, 2019

Maybe, in a perfect world, children would love both of their parents the same amount—but a new survey of 2,000 Brits conducted by ChannelMum and posted on Study Finds reveals that 50% of adults are either mama’s boys or daddy’s girls.

If you think for just a moment, you’ll identity celebrities who fit that mold: Bradley Cooper is the former; and Ivanka Trump, the latter, for sure.

Overall, the researchers discovered, 40% of respondents preferred their mothers, while one in seven preferred their fathers.

Interestingly enough, these allegiances seem to flip-flop as children age. Children initially are closer to their mothers, but 35% switch over to team dad by age 13. However, by the age of 20, one-third of them (35%) will switch back to preferring their mothers.

Many children appear to be proud of their closeness with a particular parent; with 21% of male respondents calling themselves a mama’s boy, and 22% of female respondents agreeing that they’re daddy’s girl.

“It’s often assumed that children are always closest to their mum, but this simply isn’t the case,” explains Siobhan Freegard, a parenting expert with ChannelMum, in a statement. “As fathers become more hands-on, there are plenty of children and adults who value the bond with dad just as much—and in some cases, even more than their relationship with their mum.”

Additionally, researchers found that different life events can influence parental preferences among children. Having a baby, for example, is more likely to bring people closer to their mothers than their fathers. Grown sons and daughters also turn to their mothers more often when they move, get their first job, or get married.

On the other hand, children are generally more likely to develop shared interests with their fathers as they enter adulthood. Children also feel closer to their fathers after being taught a new skill or craft by dad.

The survey also shed some light on sibling relationship dynamics. Almost one in five respondents admitted to being jealous of a sibling’s relationship with their parents. As far as jealousy among parents, 13% of parental respondents said they feel jealous when their children “pick” the other parent.

It’s common for parents to fear drifting apart from their children; more than four in 10 parental respondents admitted that losing touch with their children as they grow older is a major concern.

However, at the end of the day, the survey showed the most important factor in building a positive parent-child relationship is being there for each other no matter what (58%).

Other important relationship building factors included being able to talk about any topic (58%), spending quality time together (56%), establishing mutual respect (55%), and forgiving each other when mistakes are made (45%).

The survey was conducted by OnePoll.

Research contact: @StudyFinds

 

 

 

Study: 55% of men are ashamed of their body hair

July 22, 2019

It’s masculine, it’s sexy … it’s embarrassing. While women may like a little chest hair, back hair, or facial hair on their partners’ bodies, over half of men admit to feeling flustered by their body hair, new research has found.

The fascinating statistic emerged in a survey of 2,000 men—conducted by OnePoll on behalf of BAKblade and posted by SWNS Digital— which found that 55% of all respondents said they felt ashamed of their body hair, with 20% saying they feel this way “often.”

Indeed, OnePoll found, many men are chagrined by their chest hair (40%) and back hair (35%). And this feeling of embarrassment may stop them from participating in certain activities. For example, nearly one-third of men surveyed (31%) said they’ve avoided swimming, while another one in four (27%) said they’ve avoided the gym.

Even worse, about 20% believe that their body hair has had a negative impact on their sex lives.

But, even with all of this humiliation, fully 44% of men aren’t doing anything about it, because they consider it “unmanly” for men to practice good grooming habits.

“When most men think of having better ‘grooming habits’ they often think of going into a salon and waiting for their name to be called for their waxing session. Who wants that? BAKblade strives to ‘keep it in the bathroom’ and allow men to manage the issues themselves,” said Matt Dryfhout, CEO and founder of BAKblade, in Chicago. “Our back and body shavers allow men to continue to feel ‘manly’ and keep their dignity while managing the problem in the privacy of their homes.”

The survey also found that men also aren’t too keen on shaving anything but their face, with 62% saying they’ve never shaved their back, and 53% saying they’ve never shaved their legs. Over half of men (56%) also agree that men should only shave their face.

However, the study found that men are definitely curious, as 43% of those surveyed said they’ve secretly used a partner’s grooming product, whether it’s a moisturizer, or a face wash.

 “While men, overall, are getting more curious in the area of grooming, it is the Millennials [who] are showing the most curiosity,” continued Dryfhout. “The biggest hurdle has been showing men options available to them while at the same time letting them know how easy it can be. ”

Research contact: @BaKbladeshaver

So far, so good: Nearly 60% of long-distance relationships are successful

July 18, 2019

Nearly 60% of relationships involving people who live far-removed from each other will “go the distance,” according to the findings of a recent study, posted by StudyFinds.

It may take a lot of work, a lot of faith, and a heck of a commitment to make a long-distance relationship work, but the new findings should give couples who are separated by geography hope that there will no love lost between them.

The study, commissioned by Amsterdam-based interactive sex toy company KIIROO, also helped define what a long-distance relationship truly means. Averaging the responses from 1,000 U.S. adult participants who, themselves, have been in a long-distance union, they calculated that “long-distance” require one to live at least 132 miles from his or her significant other.

While most partners are optimistic at the outset of the long-distance relationship, the four-month mark is when the distance becomes challenging, the survey showed. But hang in there: After eight months, the lifestyle becomes a piece of cake.

Interestingly enough, about 50% of the respondents said they had met their partner online,  while 27% said they never lived close to them to begin with.

So what’s the key to success? Cellphones, for one thing. The couples in the survey reported that they sent their significant others 343 texts per week on average — or 49 per day — and spent about eight hours a week talking to each other on the phone or via video chat.

Still, these modes of communication don’t replace physical presence. Two-thirds of the respondents agreed that the long-distance travel was the most challenging aspect of their relationship. Three in 10 said they missed the sex the most.

Toon Timmermans, CEO of KIIROO, remarked in a formal release, “We forge new relationships online more now, than ever before. From the results of this study, we see that technology in any shape or form is being used by long-distance relationships to feel closer, to feel loved—and to attempt help ease sexual tensions that may arise due to the distance.”

There were some other positives to living far from a partner. Fifty-five percent said the time apart from one another made them feel closer, and 81% agreed that it actually made the moments together more intimate.

Perhaps the biggest surprise finding of all: About 70% of respondents admitted said they actually talked to their significant other more while they lived apart.

The survey was conducted by research firm OnePoll in October 2018.

Research contact: @StudyFinds 

Road zombies: 27% of Americans admit to sometimes ‘driving on autopilot’

July 2, 2019

Have you ever pulled into your parking spot at work—and realized that you don’t remember exactly what you did behind the wheel on the way there? You are not alone. Many of us “zone out” when we are navigating a familiar road, especially when we have a lot on our minds.

In fact, a recent survey of 2,000 U.S. drivers sponsored by Columbus, Ohio-based Root Insurance has revealed that more than one-quarter (27%) of Americans say they sometimes are “zombie drivers,” according to a report by Study Finds.

What’s more, fully 55% said they often feel like they are driving on autopilot. On average, drivers said they lose concentration about four times per week, and it happens more often during longer drives.

When asked why zombie driving occurs so often, 49% said it happens when they have a lot on their minds, 42% feel it occurs when they drive tired, and 40% tend to daydream while driving on familiar roads. Surprisingly, despite all of this absent-minded driving, 90% of respondents said they consider themselves good drivers.

Americans seem to enjoy multitasking on the road as well; with 55% admitting to eating while driving, 51% reporting that they talk on the phone, and 36% checking for texts and notifications. One-third even have changed the music on their smartphones while behind the wheel.

Interestingly enough, when drivers are put in the passenger seat they seem to be a bit more cautious, with 49% of respondents saying they have at least one friend or family member that makes them feel unsafe as a passenger.

The survey was conducted by OnePoll.

Research contact: @RootInsuranceco

Call Dad on Father’s Day!

June 17, 2019

Looking for that last-minute Father’s Day gift? Just don’t forget to pick up the phone. The number-one present that 2,000 U.S. dads said in a recent survey that they wanted for their big day is a phone call from their kid(s), SWNS Digital reports. Fully 47% said they wanted to hear from children and grandchildren—literally.

The new survey, conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Omaha Steaks, found that 57% percent of dads actually admitted that the third Sunday in June is their favorite day of the year.

After the phone call, most Dads thought that a good meal would make them happy. Four in ten American fathers (41%) said a big juicy steak would make their day this year (no surprise, when the survey is by Omaha Steaks!).

In fact, 79% of dads say they like to bond with their children over food. But if it’s a cook-out you’re after, stay off the grill, because one in three dads say that if someone is grilling, it’s gonna be them.

Another no-brainer: Fully 38% said they could really just go with some peace and quiet.

Taking in a ball game with the family also scored high, with another 38% saying that sounded like a lovely Father’s Day treat. And slightly fewer (33%) said they just want to be able to watch what they like on TV.

Finally, when it comes to physical gifts, go light on the ties and socks—and abolish anything imprinted with “World’s Favorite Dad.” In fact, 64% of survey respondents said they never wanted to see anything with those three words again.

Research contact: @OmahaSteaks

These are the actresses whom Americans want to see as their movie mothers

May 10, 2019

With Mother’s Day just around the corner, OnePoll has fielded a survey on behalf of Groupon—asking 2,000 Americans whom they think would best represent their mother on the big screen. And the top choice is Meryl Streep, an actress who has portrayed mothers in many of her most popular movies, from Kramer Vs. Kramer to Sophie’s Choice to Heartburn to Mama Mia: Here We Go Again, reports SWNS Digital.

The full top 10 list of actresses and celebrities whom we like to see as moms goes as follows:

  1. Meryl Streep
  2. Sally Field
  3. Julia Roberts
  4. Jennifer Lopez
  5. Angelina Jolie
  6. Oprah Winfrey
  7. Jennifer Anniston
  8. Michelle Obama
  9. Melissa McCarthy
  10. Queen Latifah

Results also revealed what people know most — and least— about their mothers’ life stories.

It turns out, Americans are confident that  they know where their mom grew up (74%), where she went to high school or college (60%), the street she grew up on (50%), her first job (49%), and her genealogy/ancestry (48%).

When it comes to what Americans know least about their mom’s past, it’s the more subtle things such as how many pets she had as a kid, former partner(s), her favorite subject in school, her hobbies as a kid, and what she wanted to be when she grew up.

While 89% of those surveyed said they know a great deal about their mom’s life, that doesn’t mean they aren’t eager to learn more. Fully 72% of respondents revealed they want to know even more than they already do about their mom.

“Mother’s Day is the perfect opportunity to not only celebrate what your mom has done for you, but what she’s done throughout her entire life,” said Groupon President of North America Aaron Cooper, adding,  “While most of us feel like we know everything we possibly can about our mom, these results show that there’s a strong appetite to learn even more about her life story and the passions that drive her interests.”

In addition, fewer than half of survey respondents knew their mom’s favorite food (45% ), flower (37%), song (30%), movie (29%), clothing store (28%), travel destination (23%), actor/actress (21%), or alcoholic drink (21%).

But that doesn’t mean Americans don’t have opinions about what they think their mom was like before they were born. Nearly one-quarter (24% think their mom had better style when she was their age.

And when it comes to the character traits that people reportedly got from their mom, compassion topped the list—with nearly half (49%) admitting to getting this quality from their mom.

Other character traits that people think they got from their mom include sensitivity (44%), work ethic (40%), sense of humor (37%) and good looks (35%).

Research contact: @Groupon

Comfort zone: The average lifespan of the American couch

May 1, 2019

Whether you rate yourself as a “couch potato” or not, few pieces of furniture in your home will ever get more use from family, friends, and pets than the living room sofa, based on a survey of 2,000 Americans conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Rove Concepts, a furniture design and production firm based in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

The average American couch is six years old, holds $1.55 in change, and has been cried on 17 times—based on results of the research, SWNS Digital reported on April 29.

What’s more, America’s typical couch has been napped on 36 times, played host to 32 conversations with family and friends, and supported us through 21 sick days so far, according to results.

While 70% of Americans rate their couch as comfortable enough overall, more than 20% said their couch is faded; and 34% said it’s on their replacement wish list. Indeed, 11% of respondents said their couch was the oldest piece of furniture in the household—outlived only by the bedroom dresser (12%).

Most admitted that they had not replaced any furniture in nearly three years. Sadly, fewer than half (44%) of respondents were “house proud,”  with 10%  going so far as to say they are embarrassed by the appearance of their home.

A spokesperson for Rove said: “The furniture you select [is] a reflection of how you want to feel in your living space. These pieces become a part of the everyday moments that truly make a living space your home.”

Research contact: @RoveConcepts

Life’s ‘greatest small victory’: Finding money in a coat pocket

September 19, 2018

Whether it’s “pennies from heaven” or a true windfall, one of life’s greatest small victories is finding cash in a long-unworn coat pocket, according to results of a study conducted on behalf of the online casino Casumo.com by OnePoll.

Other mood-boosters include receiving an unexpected discount at the checkout counter and spotting loose change on the street, according to a report on the study posted by SWNS Digital.

Greg Tatton-Brown, a marketing and management consultant based in London, commented on behalf of Casumo, “There’s something completely untainted about finding an extra fiver in a coat you haven’t worn in a long time, and it feels right that the experience was named the ultimate little victory in life.

In fact, any opportunity where our finances receive an unexpected boost, however minor, appears to be a key factor in brightening up our day when we need it,” Tatton-Brown said.

A list of the top 20 little victories we all celebrate, compiled by the researchers, includes the following:

  1. Finding money in a coat pocket;
  2. Learning at the checkout counter that your purchase is on sale;
  3. Finding money on the floor;
  4. Getting good weather for a special event;
  5. When a delivery scheduled between 8 m. and 5 p.m. arrives at 8.01 a.m.;
  6. Not needing any work done at the dentist;
  7. Receiving an unexpected tax refund;
  8. When you arrive in a full parking lot just as someone is leaving a space;
  9. Being upgraded to first class;
  10. Getting in a line at the front just before loads of other people arrive;
  11. Someone leaving a table in a busy pub just as you get there;
  12. Getting home just as the postman was about to leave a ‘Sorry we missed you’ card;
  13. Finding a parking space right outside the shop you are going into;
  14. Coming into the house just as it starts raining;
  15. Getting to the bus stop just as it arrives;
  16. When a social event you really don’t want to attend gets cancelled;
  17. Getting two chocolate bars instead of one from the vending machine;
  18. Hitting all the green lights on the way into work;
  19. Getting the last of something on offer in a supermarket; or
  20. Waking up in the night and realizing you still have hours left in bed before you have to get up.

Indeed, fully 74% of respondents think that a little win has the power to rescue a bad day from disaster and give them a sunnier perspective on things. One-quarter of survey participants said they are most likely to encounter a win at home, and only 5% of workers think they are most likely to score a little victory at work.

One in five also admit that they write a smug post on social media to publicly share their little win, no matter how small. Conversely, 37% get a little boost hearing about other people’s victories, and 48% say they do their best each day to make sure people they know get the little wins they need.

Tatton-Brown added: “They are innocuous in most cases, and often barely worth bringing up in conversation, but there is still a small and personal joy in getting a little win when things might not be going your way.

“Whether it’s spotting a lucky penny on the ground, landing a lucky win on an online game, or even swinging your car into a parking space flawlessly, life is full of little victories.

Research contact: grant.bailey@swns.com

Losing their lunch: America’s workers can’t catch a break

September 4, 2018

More than half (51%) of America’s workers say that “it is rare or unrealistic” for them to take a proper lunch break away from their desks or job sites, based on findings of a survey conducted on behalf of Eggland’s Best by OnePoll and posted on August 30 by SWNS Digital.

The poll of 2,000 American workers asked them to reveal their lunch and snacking habits—and found that job stress and the pressure to deliver on high workloads is taking its toll.

That might explain why America’s modern office workers are now more likely to eat at their desks at than any other location, according to the data.

Fully 30% of respondents said that productivity is the biggest reason to stay close to the computer while supposedly taking a break. A lack of time and a perception that there is always too much work to be done also made the top five reasons to eat lunch at your desk each day.

The study found that a very focused 49% of workers—especially those 18 to 44 years of age— say they believe that lunch can be a distraction from getting work done; however those over the age of 45 disagreed.

With a lot of work and little time in the day for themselves, the results indicated that eating habits are changing to suit such hectic routines, with an emphasis on snacking prioritized over lengthy meals.

With few workers receiving a full lunch hour, the survey found that 68% of American workers snack twice a day, and three in ten workers enjoy snacking three times a day. They identified “health snacks” as the following: fruit, nuts and seeds, Vegetable sticks, yogurt, granola, hard-boiled eggs, cheese, humus or nut/seed butter, and pretzels.

In fact, 44% of Americans even have a “snack drawer” at work dedicated to little bites to keep them going throughout the day. Who is most likely to appreciate the office snack drawer? The majority are Millennials and those who hold a traditional 9 to 5 office job.

“As the workplace shifts, so does the traditional lunch hour. With the average lunch ‘hour’ now likely to be 30 minutes or less, American workers are now snacking at least twice a day, not surprisingly between breakfast and lunch, and then when hunger strikes again between 2 p.m. and 3 p.m.,” stated a Kimberly Murphy, director of New Ventures and Innovation at Eggland’s Best.

Where do workers stock up on snacks? They are most likely to get snacks from the grocery store (60%); followed by bringing in homemade snacks (37%), or raiding the vending machine (25 %). And while most of America tends to grab sweet snacks, American workers in the Midwest crave salty instead!

Research contact: usnews@swns.com

Acne can make you go bananas—in a good way

August 6, 2018

On average, Americans feel they experience five bad skin days each month, based on findings of a recent study of 2,000 adults sponsored by CeraVe and conducted by OnePoll. That means that in a single year, the average American will suffer from 60 terrible skin days.

It’s enough to make you go bananas—but in a good way.

Strange, but true: Anecdotal evidence shows, many who suffer from acne, oily skin, psoriasis, eczema——even warts and skin discolorations—have found that rubbing the inside of the skin of a ripe banana (one with dark spots) on your face can bring relief from the redness, inflammation, pain and number of occurrences of the problem.P

You cut the banana skin up; then, rub a piece of it on your face very gently. Leave it there for half an hour, after which you can wash it off with cool water. (You also can leave it there overnight, for good results.)

Among the hundreds of positive posts on the site, Acne.org, are the following—many of them, from former skeptics and cynics:

  • Outstanding result: Last week, I saw the reviews about banana peels and I have started to use [to use the peels on my broken out facial] skin. OMG. The amazing results appeared. So what does it do to my skin? (1) Reduces inflammation incredibly. (2) Heals pimples greatly. (3) Empties blackheads from pores. (4) Gently exfoliates. [I recommend that} … you leave it on your skin throughout the night. Choose, use it, and love it. Toby_boy
  • Shook: To say I was skeptical of this is undermining how I really felt. I was just have a bad breakout week, as well as a rash from a medical. I was desperate and nothing else was working, so I … rubbed a banana peel on the spots for a minute; then let it dry and went to sleep.(Others did this three times  day, but I only had time to do it at night.) … Woke up [with] a significantly less red face and shrunken pimples. I continued this for three more nights and my skin is 60% better and [the] facial redness/rash is gone .… So give it a try! It can’t hurt and it’s natural! Serena_95
  • I am so [darn] happy: Really, my acne was [so] bad that I [was] depressed and didn’t even wanna leave my house. I refused to look in people’s eyes because I [felt] like they were judging me. Acne covered my cheeks and I have oily skin, so I [felt] very dirty and I had tried every single product, but no improvement .… And this works so amazingly! I have only been using this for two days, and it works. How I use: Pick a yellow banana peel and massage gently over my entire face and sleep with this. Remember, it’s just my skin and you are different … but I hope it works for you guys, too. Mooniey

Why does it work? According to the site, Live Science, a wide variety of health benefits are associated with bananas. They are high in potassium and pectin, a form of fiber, said Laura Flores, a San Diego-based nutritionist. They can also be a good way to get magnesium and vitamins C and B6.

“Bananas are known to reduce swelling, protect against developing type-2 diabetes, aid in weight loss, strengthen the nervous system and help with production of white blood cells, all due to the high level of vitamin B6 that bananas contain,” Flores told Live Science.

“Bananas also are high in antioxidants,” she said, “which can provide protection from free radicals, which we come into contact with every day, from the sunlight to the lotion you put on your skin.”

And here’s another plus. If you are upset about your acne, bananas can be helpful in overcoming depression—”due to high levels of tryptophan, which the body converts to serotonin, the mood-elevating brain neurotransmitter,” Flores said. Plus, vitamin B6 can help you sleep well, and magnesium helps to relax muscles. Additionally, the tryptophan in bananas is well-known for its sleep-inducing properties.

Eaten in moderation, there are no significant side effects associated with eating bananas. However, eating the fruits in excess may trigger headaches and sleepiness, Flores said. She said that such headaches are caused by “the amino acids in bananas that dilate blood vessels.” Overripe bananas contain more of these amino acids than other bananas. “Bananas can also contribute to sleepiness when eaten in excess due to the high amount of tryptophan found in them,” she said.

Research contact: hello@onepoll.com