Posts tagged with "OnePoll"

Most Americans say they’re banning unvaccinated family members from holiday gatherings

November 15, 2021

The holidays are about to get heated. Nearly two-thirds of vaccinated Americans have banned unvaccinated family members from their holiday gatherings this year, according to findings of a new poll, reports SWNS.

A survey of 2,000 U.S. residents—conducted by OnePoll on November 2—examined how the COVID-19 vaccine has impacted people’s relationships with their loved ones ahead of the holidays this year.

Based on the results, nearly seven in 10 respondents (67%) said they feel they cannot go home for the holidays without getting vaccinated first. 

Of the 65% who are fully vaccinated, 6 in 10 (58%) have reportedly cut off family members who refuse to get vaccinated, while 63% don’t feel comfortable inviting unvaccinated relatives to their parties.

Seventy-two percent of vaccinated respondents don’t think they could ever get some of these family members to understand the importance of the vaccine.

In fact, 14% of survey respondents don’t plan to ever get the shot themselves.

When asked about their decision, one respondent shared that they “don’t trust the vaccine is safe,” while another said they were “concerned about side effects.”

One even admitted believing the vaccine “was rushed and people who are getting vaccinated are still getting sick.”

Half of unvaccinated respondents (49%) have stopped communicating with family members who don’t understand why they refuse the shot.

These strained family dynamics may explain why 22% of unvaccinated respondents have so far been excluded from all family gatherings, including the holidays.

However, 38% of unvaccinated people said they remain in contact with their vaccinated loved ones, and 58% of the same group added that they’re still welcome at family get-togethers.

Research contact: @SWNS

Top dog: Americans trust their pets’ judgment when it comes to romantic partners

November 12, 2021

Two in every three Americans would end their current romantic relationship, if their pet disapproves, according to new research reported on by SWNS Digital.

In  survey of 2,000 single and dating Americans conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Zesty Paws, researchers found that 68% said their pet has the final say in whom they date.

Indeed, 71% of respondents said they trust their pet’s judgment over their own. Likewise, 68% trust their pets more than their friends and 67% trust them more than their own family.

In the same study, nearly 7 in 10 Americans (69%) said they had dated someone their pet didn’t like. Luckily, 69% of those who have had their pets reject their dates said their pets liked their next partner.

Sixty-seven percent can thank their pet for scoring the first date with a potential partner or their current partner. But if the first date and meeting of the pet doesn’t go well, 68% said there’s no chance of a second date.

Respondents gave varying reasons for their pet’s distaste for their current or ex-partner—including not liking their scent, height, or lack of attention.

The most obvious signs a pet doesn’t like potential partners include not going near them (47%), clawing/biting them (41%), and growling/hissing at them (40%). And if a potential partner is rude towards a pet, 64% of respondents said they could never forgive them

In order to be liked by a pet, respondents said their partner needs to be friendly (44%), give behind-the-ear scratches (40%), and give treats (38%).

Research contact: @SWNS

A new color scale depicting five distinct shades of ‘yellow’ tells us when we need to hydrate

April 27, 2021

A new color scale has been created with five different shades of  “yellow,” each of which indicates whether we are properly hydrated or not, SWNS Digital reports.

Color experts from the Carlstadt, New Jersey-based Pantone Color Institute have teamed up with London nutritionist Lily Soutter and Scottish bottled water supplier Highland Spring to create the ‘shades of pee’ visual to highlight the importance of hydration.

The five shades of yellow have names such as “Dry Spell” for the darkest shade and “Spring In Your Step”for the lightest. The in-between shades are aptly called “Feeling Good.” “Glass Half Full.” and “You’re At Amber.”

The guide is unveiled to mark Highland Spring’s new 10-litre (338 fluid ounce) hydration pack going on sale, and comes after a study of 2,000 adults found 40%r cent are confused about how much water they should be drinking.

Despite believing they should be consuming seven glasses of water a day, people typically have five—although 23% just manage to drink one to two.

Nutritionist Lily Soutter points to the NHS advice on the health benefits of proper hydration and said: “Drinking enough fluids and staying hydrated throughout the day is important for energy, concentration, mood, and even exercise performance.”

But 43% of respondents said they do not think they are getting enough—because they simply forget to drink water (63%), get distracted by their day-to-day routine (42 %), or are too busy (15%), SWNS Digital reports.

Carol Saunders, spokesperson for Highland Spring said: “Our bodies have a built-in and natural way of helping us to know if we are drinking enough fluids. We know it can be embarrassing to talk about our pee, but it’s an important indicator to help us stay hydrated.

“So we’ve partnered with Pantone Color Institute to kick start that conversation, because for many of us, drinking enough fluids is the first step to feeling more like our natural selves in any self-care routine.”

The study also found people are likely to drink more water if the weather is warmer (33%), if they cut back on other beverages such as coffee (27%) , or if they set reminders (21%).

And almost a 25% of adults track how much they drink throughout the day, by using an app (26%), writing it down (22%), or using the measurements marked on a bottle (27%).

However,  more than 50% of respondents do not take a bottle of water with them when they leave the house and 23% of desk workers admit that they do not keep a drink at their desk.

One in 10 of those polled via international research firm OnePoll do not even have a drink when they exercise and 14%  do not have one with a meal.

Side effects people have experienced from not staying hydrated enough included a dry mouth (46%), dark urine (43%), and fatigue (26%).

Whereas the benefits adults have enjoyed from keeping on top of their water consumption were found to be clearer skin (25%), feeling more active (22%), and reduced cravings for snacks (18%).

Laurie Pressman, vice president of the Pantone Color Institute, said: “Eating right and drinking proper amounts of water are critical contributors to taking care of our personal health and our overall well-being.

“Being able to collaborate with Highland Spring and their expert nutrition partner Lily Soutter to create a color flow chart illustrating the relationship between urine color and hydration levels highlights how the visual language of color can be used as an indicator to provide quick and natural insights as to whether we are keeping ourselves healthfully hydrated.”

Research contact: @SWNS

‘Thirst’ aid: Does drinking lots of water lead to happiness and health?

December 24, 2020

Does being properly hydrated have a transcendent effect on our lives? A new survey of 2,000 Americans has found that those of us who drink six or more glasses of water daily tend to be more optimistic, energetic, and successful, according to a report by Good News Network.

Indeed, the poll—conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Bosch Home Appliances—established that people who drink a half dozen or more glasses of water per day are the most likely to strongly agree that they are “very happy” (41%).

Compare that to those who self-report drinking less than one glass per day: Only 12% strongly agree with that same statement.

What’s more, 40% of those who drink six or optimistic by nature, compared to just 10% of those who drink less than one glass of water a day.

Refreshment also could be the key to waking up feeling refreshed. The study found that those who drink six or more glasses woke up feeling exhausted fewer times each week (2.59) than those who drink less than one glass of water a day (3.14).

Research contact: @goodnewsnetwork

The ‘eyes’ have it: How to read facial expressions when they are obscured by a mask

November 24, 2020

In a recent study, commissioned by York, England-based Vision Direct, fully 76 % of Brits struggled to read the moods of others who were wearing protective face coverings—with more than half misinterpreting their conversational partner’s expressions and feelings completely.

Indeed, the survey of 2,000 Brits—conducted on behalf of Vision Direct by OnePoll—found that:

  • More than two-thirds of adults struggle to see how someone is feeling when they have a mask on;
  • More than 60% of adults admit to misunderstanding what someone was saying when they had a mask on, with 42% putting this down to not being able to see their lips.
  • About 70% now are consciously trying to look at people’s eyes to guess what expression they are hiding behind the mask.

Now, UK-based body language expert and TV personality Judi James has revealed her top tips—and not surprisingly, it is all in the eyes, SWNS Digital reports.

James says, “The human animal has always depended on facial expression as a way of social and workplace communication and, over the years, the key focus has been the mouth. We have come to depend on this widening of the lips as a rapport-building social shorthand, which is why the wearing of face masks has caused worries in terms of closing down our ability to communicate.

“The good news,” she notes, “is that our eyes are more than capable of taking over the job of transmitting and reading non-verbal signals, in fact one of the reasons we tend to direct attention to our mouths is that our eyes are such strong (and more honest) conveyors of moods and emotions.”

She indicates a genuine-looking eye-smile should involve some wrinkling at the corners and the rounding of the cheeks.

An “eye-flash”—during which the eyes narrow in the eye-smile but the brows pop up and down again in one rapid movement—can signify that someone is flirting and “likes what they see.”

While a rounding of the eyes suggests shared excitement and those who are in love will have dilated pupils—giving true meaning to the ‘look of love’.

But not all eye-signs are indicators of happy: As James points out, there are tell-tale signs of someone feeling disgusted or angry. To recognize disgust on the face of someone wearing a mask, you should look out for a puckered frown, narrowed eye shape, and a wrinkling of the skin at the bridge of the nose.

Similarly, anger is typically displayed with knitted brows that come as low as possible over the eyes, plus a hard eye-stare with the eyes slightly rounded. The head would be tilted slightly forward too.

What’s more, James cautions that reading other’s eye expressions is important but we also need to be aware of our own. “Our ‘resting’ faces can make us look miserable and unapproachable and without all those mouth shrugs or grins in our repertoire we need to make an active effort to use our eyes to transmit friendly smiles and expressions of empathy.”

Following the findings, Vision Direct has created a quiz to test the nation on its ability to recognize key everyday expressions—via the eyes.

To take the quiz visit www.visiondirect.co.uk/facial-expressions-under-the-face-mask

Research contact: @SWNS

The ‘eyes’ have it: How to read facial expressions when they are obscured by a mask

November 24, 2020

In a recent study, commissioned by York, England-based Vision Direct, fully 76 % of Brits struggled to read the moods of others who were wearing protective face coverings—with more than half misinterpreting their conversational partner’s expressions and feelings completely.

Indeed, the survey of 2,000 Brits—conducted on behalf of Vision Direct by OnePoll—found that:

  • More than two-thirds of adults struggle to see how someone is feeling when they have a mask on;
  • More than 60% of adults admit to misunderstanding what someone was saying when they had a mask on, with 42% putting this down to not being able to see their lips.
  • About 70% now are consciously trying to look at people’s eyes to guess what expression they are hiding behind the mask.

Now, UK-based body language expert and TV personality Judi James has revealed her top tips—and not surprisingly, it is all in the eyes, SWNS Digital reports.

James says, “The human animal has always depended on facial expression as a way of social and workplace communication and, over the years, the key focus has been the mouth. We have come to depend on this widening of the lips as a rapport-building social shorthand, which is why the wearing of face masks has caused worries in terms of closing down our ability to communicate.

“The good news,” she notes, “is that our eyes are more than capable of taking over the job of transmitting and reading non-verbal signals, in fact one of the reasons we tend to direct attention to our mouths is that our eyes are such strong (and more honest) conveyors of moods and emotions.”

She indicates a genuine-looking eye-smile should involve some wrinkling at the corners and the rounding of the cheeks.

An “eye-flash”—during which the eyes narrow in the eye-smile but the brows pop up and down again in one rapid movement— can signify that someone is flirting and “likes what they see.”

While a rounding of the eyes suggests shared excitement and those who are in love will have dilated pupils – giving true meaning to the ‘look of love’.

But not all eye-signs are indicators of happy: As James points out, there are tell-tale signs of someone feeling disgusted or angry. To recognize disgust on the face of someone wearing a mask, you should look out for a puckered frown, narrowed eye shape, and a wrinkling of the skin at the bridge of the nose.

Similarly, anger is typically displayed with knitted brows that come as low as possible over the eyes, plus a hard eye-stare with the eyes slightly rounded. The head would be tilted slightly forward too.

What’s more, James cautions that reading other’s eye expressions is important but we also need to be aware of our own. “Our ‘resting’ faces can make us look miserable and unapproachable and without all those mouth shrugs or grins in our repertoire we need to make an active effort to use our eyes to transmit friendly smiles and expressions of empathy.”

Following the findings, Vision Direct has created a quiz to test the nation on its ability to recognize key everyday expressions—via the eyes.

To take the quiz visit www.visiondirect.co.uk/facial-expressions-under-the-face-mask

Research contact: @SWNS

Scared of school: 4 out of 5 parents are considering homeschooling their kids this fall

August 4, 2020

A new survey has found that four out of five parents nationwide are thinking seriously about homeschooling their children during the 2020-2021 academic year.

The poll—commissioned by Crispy Green, a producer of freeze-dried fruit snacks; and conducted by OnePoll—spoke with 2,000 U.S mothers and fathers to see how families are adjusting to the “new normal” created by COVID-19.

Health is the biggest concern for most parents. The vast majority of respondents say the risk of infection is their biggest worry, according to a report by Study Finds. 

Among the parents thinking about a virtual education, 81% point to increasing health concerns. Eighty-two percent admit they’re more scared to send their kids into a school than ever before.

Parents also worry that, once children are back in class, hygiene issues will quickly put schools at risk. About 60% of respondents don’t believe their children will properly wash their hands in school. Nearly half the respondents say they’re trying to teach their kids about proper hygiene during the pandemic.

Researchers say a majority of parents are also taking this time in isolation to talk to their children more about safety and the importance of social distancing.

Another big takeaway from the poll is how costly COVID-19 will be for parents preparing children for school. Three in four respondents are expecting to spend an extra $147 per child to get them the proper supplies. Those same parents add that getting their kids ready for class will take much longer. They believe prepping to go to school during the pandemic will take an extra 40 minutes each morning.

Despite all the preparations families are making, 77% of moms and dads say they won’t be fully prepared for schools to reopen. Many parents have a long list of demands for education officials before they begin to feel comfortable with the idea of going back to school.

Over half, 55%, want increased COVID-19 testing and regular temperature checks on school premises, Study Finds notes. Nearly the same number of parents want smaller class sizes in the fall. Fifty percent want plenty of hand sanitizer available for children; while 40% of parents want schools to use more digital textbooks, too.

However, despite all the uncertainty tied to the next school year, parents know their children are doing a better job of coping with all the changes than they are. Fully 71% admit they wouldn’t have handled a pandemic as well when they were children.

Research contact: @StudyFinds

Children think Dad is a better driver than Mom—but he steps on the gas too much and suffers road rage

July 2, 2020

Children think Dad is a better driver than Mom—but he steps on the gas too much and suffers road rage. In fact, when it come to cars and driving, most children would prefer to have their fathers behind the wheel, a new study of 1,000 kids, ages 6-16 by carmaker MG, has found, SWS Digital reports.

.A study by Amsterdam-based MG Motors —which looked at responses of 1,000 6-16 year-olds whose parents both drive—found that fully 43% named Dad as the ‘best’ behind the wheel, while only 29 per cent opted for Mom.

When rating how the parents function on the road, the children had definite opinions about who was best at what, as follows:

  • Fastest driver: Dad
  • Most road rage: Dad
  • Most likely to get lost: Mom
  • Most likely to bump the car: Mom
  • Best at parallel parking: Dad
  • Best at reverse parking: Dad
  • Best at parking in a tight space: Dad
  • Best at switching lanes on a highway: Dad
  • Best at hill starts: Dad
  • Best at doing three-point turn: Dad
  • Best at changing a tire: Dad

So, in nine out of 11 categories, Dad is rated as the most dexterous driver. However, SWS Digital notes that, despite this, 35% of youngsters prefer being in the car with their Mom, naming her as the parent most likely to join in with car games, such as I Spy, while on a journey.

Tiffany Wilcox, from MG, which commissioned the research to celebrate the family friendly model range, said: “The results paint an interesting picture of family car journeys and how kids see their parents.

“Everyone remembers family road trips from when they were younger, the discussions which are had, games that are played, and music choices.

It also emerged men are more likely to take the driving seat for family car journeys, according to 65% of the youngsters polled. But this may be because half of the respondents said their Mom is more susceptible to getting lost and having to ask for directions.

The study, carried out via OnePoll, also revealed that 31% of kids prefer being in dad’s car—with half of them stating this is because it’s bigger, while 27 per cent put it down to the fact it has more technology, such as Apple Car Play.

Research contact: @swsdigital

Mama’s boy or daddy’s girl? Half of adults admit they have a favorite parent

July 24, 2019

Maybe, in a perfect world, children would love both of their parents the same amount—but a new survey of 2,000 Brits conducted by ChannelMum and posted on Study Finds reveals that 50% of adults are either mama’s boys or daddy’s girls.

If you think for just a moment, you’ll identity celebrities who fit that mold: Bradley Cooper is the former; and Ivanka Trump, the latter, for sure.

Overall, the researchers discovered, 40% of respondents preferred their mothers, while one in seven preferred their fathers.

Interestingly enough, these allegiances seem to flip-flop as children age. Children initially are closer to their mothers, but 35% switch over to team dad by age 13. However, by the age of 20, one-third of them (35%) will switch back to preferring their mothers.

Many children appear to be proud of their closeness with a particular parent; with 21% of male respondents calling themselves a mama’s boy, and 22% of female respondents agreeing that they’re daddy’s girl.

“It’s often assumed that children are always closest to their mum, but this simply isn’t the case,” explains Siobhan Freegard, a parenting expert with ChannelMum, in a statement. “As fathers become more hands-on, there are plenty of children and adults who value the bond with dad just as much—and in some cases, even more than their relationship with their mum.”

Additionally, researchers found that different life events can influence parental preferences among children. Having a baby, for example, is more likely to bring people closer to their mothers than their fathers. Grown sons and daughters also turn to their mothers more often when they move, get their first job, or get married.

On the other hand, children are generally more likely to develop shared interests with their fathers as they enter adulthood. Children also feel closer to their fathers after being taught a new skill or craft by dad.

The survey also shed some light on sibling relationship dynamics. Almost one in five respondents admitted to being jealous of a sibling’s relationship with their parents. As far as jealousy among parents, 13% of parental respondents said they feel jealous when their children “pick” the other parent.

It’s common for parents to fear drifting apart from their children; more than four in 10 parental respondents admitted that losing touch with their children as they grow older is a major concern.

However, at the end of the day, the survey showed the most important factor in building a positive parent-child relationship is being there for each other no matter what (58%).

Other important relationship building factors included being able to talk about any topic (58%), spending quality time together (56%), establishing mutual respect (55%), and forgiving each other when mistakes are made (45%).

The survey was conducted by OnePoll.

Research contact: @StudyFinds

 

 

 

Study: 55% of men are ashamed of their body hair

July 22, 2019

It’s masculine, it’s sexy … it’s embarrassing. While women may like a little chest hair, back hair, or facial hair on their partners’ bodies, over half of men admit to feeling flustered by their body hair, new research has found.

The fascinating statistic emerged in a survey of 2,000 men—conducted by OnePoll on behalf of BAKblade and posted by SWNS Digital— which found that 55% of all respondents said they felt ashamed of their body hair, with 20% saying they feel this way “often.”

Indeed, OnePoll found, many men are chagrined by their chest hair (40%) and back hair (35%). And this feeling of embarrassment may stop them from participating in certain activities. For example, nearly one-third of men surveyed (31%) said they’ve avoided swimming, while another one in four (27%) said they’ve avoided the gym.

Even worse, about 20% believe that their body hair has had a negative impact on their sex lives.

But, even with all of this humiliation, fully 44% of men aren’t doing anything about it, because they consider it “unmanly” for men to practice good grooming habits.

“When most men think of having better ‘grooming habits’ they often think of going into a salon and waiting for their name to be called for their waxing session. Who wants that? BAKblade strives to ‘keep it in the bathroom’ and allow men to manage the issues themselves,” said Matt Dryfhout, CEO and founder of BAKblade, in Chicago. “Our back and body shavers allow men to continue to feel ‘manly’ and keep their dignity while managing the problem in the privacy of their homes.”

The survey also found that men also aren’t too keen on shaving anything but their face, with 62% saying they’ve never shaved their back, and 53% saying they’ve never shaved their legs. Over half of men (56%) also agree that men should only shave their face.

However, the study found that men are definitely curious, as 43% of those surveyed said they’ve secretly used a partner’s grooming product, whether it’s a moisturizer, or a face wash.

 “While men, overall, are getting more curious in the area of grooming, it is the Millennials [who] are showing the most curiosity,” continued Dryfhout. “The biggest hurdle has been showing men options available to them while at the same time letting them know how easy it can be. ”

Research contact: @BaKbladeshaver