Posts tagged with "New niche"

Brands see big potential in ‘nighttime nutrition’

February 25, 2020

Late-night snacks are being legitimized and “healthified” by snack brands, in hopes of creating a new and profitable niche in the industry, Food Business News reports.

A small but growing number of products designed for pre-bedtime snacking are entering the market. They’re healthier than traditional late-night fare—and offer the added benefit of promoting sleep and relaxation.

Among them is Nightfood of Tarrytown, New York, which launched a “sleep friendly” ice cream line last year. Available in a variety of flavors—including Full Moon Vanilla, Midnight Chocolate, and Cherry Eclipse—the products contain more fiber and protein (and, yes, fewer calories) than traditional ice cream. Ingredients like magnesium and glycine promote relaxation; while ingredients that may disrupt sleep, such as excess sugar, fat and caffeine, are reduced or eliminated.

“Just being delicious isn’t enough these days,” Sean Folkson, CEO at Nightfood, told Food Business News. “Neither is just being different. You need to be different, but in a way that actually matters to the consumer.”

Folkson learned that the hard way: Nightfood ice cream wasn’t the company’s first functional late-night snack—but it looks like the company’s first successful entrant in the niche. It launched a sleep-promoting nutrition bar in 2015. The brand struggled to generate consumer excitement around the product, but, Folkson said its modest results led to an important insight: When it comes to late-night snacking, consumers aren’t searching for better-for-you products like nutrition bars. They’re reaching for more indulgent items like potato chips, cookies, ice cream or candy.

“I now understand that providing night snackers with nighttime nutrition bars is like giving an eight-year old a pet rock,” he told the business publication. “Interesting, but not exciting or life-changing. On the other hand, providing night snackers with nighttime ice cream is like giving that eight-year old a puppy.”

And other companies—among them, Nestle-backed Goodnight and Milwaukee-based Good Source Foods, also are jumping on the bandwagon.

Goodnight launched last year through Foundry Foods, an internal incubator from Nestle USA. Available in milk and dark chocolate varieties, the brand’s before-bed bites contain L-Theanine, magnesium and casein protein, which interact with metabolic processes related to sleep regulation.

“(Goodnight) is confirming our beliefs that people are looking for a natural remedy for something they normally take in supplement form such as melatonin,” Doug Munk, director of New Business Ventures for Nestle USA told Food Business News. “We are also finding people are looking to replace some of their junk foods before they go to sleep with something that is a little better.”

The company currently is gearing up to launch updated “Goodnight 2.0” products following last year’s successful test run.

Good Source Foods uses dried cherries, which contain melatonin, and lavender, which is known for its calming effects, to make its Evening Calm variety of chocolate clusters. Designed to promote sleep and relaxation, the chocolates also contain turmeric, honey, oats, and walnuts.

Nightfood, Goodnight and Good Source Foods are some of the handful of brands tapping into nighttime nutrition, which Mintel called “one of the most compelling and category changing trends” in its annual Food and Drink Trends report. More than 80% of consumers snack regularly before bed, Mintel said.

There may be a biological component driving consumers to the kitchen at night. Appetite tends to peak in the evening, when cravings for sweet and salty foods are strongest. Willpower weakens throughout the day, so the later it gets, the easier it is to reach for the cookie jar or bag of candy.

At the same time, interest in better-for-you snacks is at an all-time high. As many as 80% of consumers seek healthier snacks that pack an added functional benefit.

“Scientific research over the last several years has helped us more clearly understand why people snack the way they do at night,” said Michael Grandner, director of the Sleep and Health Research Program at the University of Arizona and adviser to Nightfood. “It seems we’re biologically hard-wired to default to sweets, salts, and fats as it gets later in the day.”

This may explain why more than 50% of consumers report dissatisfaction with their own night snacking behavior, despite spending an estimated $1 billion per week on snacks consumed between dinner and bed.

“More than half of that money … is being spent in a dissatisfied way, by people that want something better,” Folkson said.  “That speaks to, not only the size of the opportunity, but the immediacy and the motivation on behalf of the consumer, which is really powerful stuff.”

Research contact: @FoodBusiness

Cold comfort: Mosaic launches a line of healthy, home-delivered frozen meals

May 3, 2019

The newest niche in home meal kit deliveries is healthful, frozen cuisine— prepared fresh, with clean ingredients by Mosaic Foods, a startup launching in select market on May 2.

 “Frozen foods is a $53 billion market that has remained unchanged for decades,” said Mosaic Co-founder and CEO Matt Davis, in a company press release. “The potential of the category is huge, and the benefits—from convenience to the reduction of food waste—are numerous. We’re launching Mosaic to elevate the category and create healthy, delicious and convenient frozen meals for consumers.”

Despite the lack of great options, frozen meals are still a significant part of the American diet. The average American consumes 72 frozen meals per year, and sales from frozen meals continue to grow steadily, the company says.

“Traditional frozen meal options are bland, filled with preservatives and artificial ingredients, and not made with the same care as our best fresh meal options,” said Mosaic Co-founder Sam McIntire. “We want to make something different by investing in great recipes and real cooking. The goal is to offer healthy, delicious meals ready in just a few minutes.”

Mosaic’s initial product line is a collection of six, globally inspired vegetarian bowls. Each bowl is made with fresh, unique ingredients such as purple cauliflower, wheat berries, and forbidden rice. These ingredients are then cooked with techniques not used in the frozen industry today, including roasting, grilling and sauteing. Each bowl comes with a separately packaged savory sauce, such as basil pesto, lemony-sweet miso, and coconut-peanut, and a flavorful garnish, such as feta crumbles, crushed almonds, and toasted pine nuts.

The full product line includes the Tuscan Pesto Bowl, the Greek Jackfruit Bowl, the Peanut Tofu Bowl, the Miso Tempeh Bowl, the Harvest Beet Bowl, and the Smoky Southwest Bowl.

Customers can order meals for delivery at www.mosaicfoods.com. Subscription delivery will begin in the Northeast, and will expand to new regions throughout the year. Details including pricing structure, regional availability, and shipping options can be found online.

Research contact: @MosaicFoods