Posts tagged with "Manhattan"

Macy’s sues to block Amazon from filching the billboard at its Herald Square flagship

October 4, 2021

In the heart of Manhattan, a battle is brewing between the traditional, bricks-and-mortar department store Macy’s and the e-commerce giant Amazon.

According to a report by The New York Times, the disagreement is over the high-visibility billboard next to Macy’s flagship store in Herald Square. For 60 years Macy’s has advertised itself on the 2,200-square-foot perch that wraps around the corner of the building, with its star logo prominent against a red background during the annual Thanksgiving Day parade that Macy’s organizes.

Now Macy’s has sued to block Amazon from getting that prime piece of advertising real estate.

Last week the retail chain filed a lawsuit in New York State Court against the billboard’s owner, Kaufman Realty, claiming that the negative impact of allowing a “direct competitor” to promote itself from a block that has long been associated with Macy’s “would be immeasurable.”

“The damages to Macy’s customer good will, image, reputation and brand should a prominent online retailer (especially Amazon) advertise on the billboard are impossible to calculate,” Macy’s said in the complaint.

Amazon and Kaufman did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

In the suit, which was reported earlier by Crain’s New York, Macy’s accused Kaufman of discussing the billboard with Amazon before its lease agreement with Macy’s expired in August. Terms set in 1963 prevent Kaufman from allowing a Macy’s competitor to advertise on the billboard, a prohibition that “runs with the land forever,” according to the complaint.

Macy’s said in a statement that it “continues to have rights relating to advertisements” at the location, adding that “we expect to realize the benefits of these rights and have asked the court to protect them.”

Research contact: @nytimes

Greatest hits: Punching gets ‘poshified’ at an upscale boxing boutique

January 18, 2019

Get ready to rumble—but not in a wrestling ring. Rumble—a rarified boxing club that opened its doors in 2016—already has a cult following at its group classes in Manhattan, Los Angeles, and San Francisco.

The luxe Rumble has attracted an upscale clientele of professionals and celebrities with its posh, crimson-lit workout rooms—enlivened by nightclub-quality sound systems blasting upbeat hip-hop music; and loft-like, high-tech architectural features.

According to a January 16 report by The Wall Street Journal, its fans include social media-savvy supermodels like Gigi Hadid, Kendall Jenner and Adriana Lima, and stylish male celebs like David Beckham, Chris Hemsworth, and Scott Eastwood—all of whom happily Instagram their jabs and crosses.

“Celebrities started showing that boxing didn’t have to be grungy,” Andy Stenzler, Rumble’s CEO, told the Journal. “That you didn’t have to hit each other to get a great workout.”

Boxing may be a centuries-old sport, but the combination of inviting spaces, trainers who aren’t bullies, and circuit-style classes feels fresh. At the chain’s elite studios, half of the space is filled with weight-training benches and dumbbells; the other half, by 185-pound boxing bags. Even the boxing gloves don’t reek of sweat; they’re stored on ski-boot heaters that kill bacteria. And the teardrop-shaped bags don’t hurt your wrists; they’re filled with water, which is more forgiving than sand.

Inside, the joint is jumping: Every 50-minute class offer two groups of 30 people each an opportunity to learn boxing— starting from introductory level instruction; and adding intensity and skill levels as participants progress (as well as private training).

Beginner-level group courses offer cardio-fueled warm-ups, pre-class instructions on the dynamics of six punches, three rounds of boxing on the bags, and three rounds of strength and conditioning.

Newbies need not fear getting punched in the nose. “We want it to be fun, not intimidating,” Stenzler told the news outlet.

First-time classes cost $32, “and,” the chain says, “we will hit you with the second one on us.” Ten classes cost $300; a private training session, $160.

Subtract the combat and, Rumble promises, boxing is still a killer total-body workout. “You’re constantly moving,” Chris Gagliardi, a certified personal trainer, told the Journal. “It’s challenging muscular endurance, strength, flexibility, body composition, your brain. You’re working on power, speed, balance, agility, coordination. It’s a lot of bang for your buck,” he said.

And if you don’t want to actually go to the gym, Rumble is taking things a step further.: Try At Home 360, a Peloton-esque venture that combines a Technogym boxing bag ($1,700, technogym.com) with a $39/month subscription for live and on-demand.

Research contact: @RumbleBoxingNYC