Posts tagged with "Lululemon"

Stretch goals: Lululemon is finally extending its size range

September 15, 2020

A larger Lululemon size offering is finally here. The Vancouver, Canada-based activewear brand announced on September 8 at a press conference helmed by CEO Calvin McDonald that it will offer sizes up to 20 for its core styles by the end of September.

The company currently only goes up to a size 14 for most pieces—and its body-hugging athletic gear is shown on the Lululemon website on models with thin frames.

Indeed, Lululemon has been called out on multiple occasions in the past for body-shaming, according to a report by Bustle. In 2013, former CEO Chip Wilson resigned after stating that Lululemon pants “don’t work for some women’s bodies.” Then, in 2017, a woman’s story went viral after she was allegedly told that she should be shopping for a larger size when visiting the Lululemon store in Canada.

Despite these incidents, the brand continues to enjoy unprecedented popularity in the activewear market, Bustle notes. Several items — including Meghan Markle’s go-to Align leggings—continue to sell out.

What’s more. those who are quarantining and working from home during a time of pandemic are choosing to wear comfortable, soft clothing. Thus, the brand was one of the few that saw a significant sales increase during the first half of the year.

While the brand will offer larger sizes for its core pieces by the end of the month; McDonald promised that the “majority of women’s products” will be more size-inclusive by the end of 2021. He added that it is “an important step forward” for the company.

Research contact: @bustle

More than meets the eye: Lululemon’s new coat shapeshifts into 26 designs, from trench to puffer

October 17, 2019

Vancouver, Canada-based fashion house and retailer Lululemon has designed a new coat that is like something out of the Transformers series.

Made n collaboration with London-based designer Roksanda Ilinčić, the “Inner Expanse Infinity Coat” is a pink ankle-length puffer coat, with a purple waterproof trench coat layer on top of it, and it’s topped off with a large puffer hood, Fast Company reported on October 16.

In campaign images, the news outlet says, a woman wears the $998 garment in a wheat field at sunset—as if it were a gown, with the puffer billowing gloriously behind her.

Indeed, Fast Company notes, “The coat encapsulates Ilinčić’s iconic aesthetic: Her love of bold colors and her feminine touch, full of ribbons, draping, and flowing fabrics. She’s best known for her collections of cocktail dresses, silk blouses, and pantsuits that come in crimson, peach, and orchid.”

Thanks to subtle, hidden buttons and zippers, the Infinity Coat can be transformed in 26 different ways. Among its many variations, it can be flipped inside out to reveal a purple puffer exterior, or the sleeves can be removed to create a vest. And to make it even more convenient, the puffer can be neatly packed into a little pouch in one of the pockets, making it easy to throw into your luggage.

The coat takes an important trend in recent outerwear design—adaptability—and pushes it to its most logical extreme.

And it’s just one part of a 16-piece collection that Ilinčić designed for Lululemon. The items include tights, joggers, and workout wear.

Although Lululemon is known for its workout wear, in recent years, Fast Company reports, the company has focused on designing streetwear, including launching The Lab, a high-end fashion-forward clothing line.

Research contact: @FastCompany

Customers don’t care when a CEO quits or gets canned

March 19, 2018

A prominent CEO’s departure from one of the country’s biggest brands will ripple across the news, sparking lengthy analysis by reporters and talking heads, and often cause a shareholder reaction. But, for the general public, it barely causes an impact on brand perception—confirming that what goes on “under the corporate hood” pretty much stays there, according to findings of a poll by YouGov BrandIndex, released on March 15.

The researchers examined five recent CEO departures from well-known global corporations—General Electric, J. Crew, Lululemon, Starbucks, and Yahoo—to see if there was any notable movement on each of their Buzz scores. Buzz scores are derived daily from asking respondents: “If you’ve heard anything about the brand in the last two weeks, through advertising, news or word of mouth, was it positive or negative?”

In all cases, each brand’s Buzz score either remained unchanged or moved very little in any direction the week after the CEO announcement. This seems to be the case whether a CEO left voluntarily or under more strained circumstances, despite the media circus that can often surround the latter.

Research contact: ted.marzilli@yougov.com