Posts tagged with "Los Angeles Times"

Beverly Hills eclipsed by Calabasas as home for rich and famous

March 2, 2020

Katy Perry, Dr. Phil, Jeff Bezos , John Legend and Chrissy Teigen, Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis, Eddie Murphy—they all have opulent homes in the 5.7-square-mile area in Los Angeles known as Beverly Hills. Indeed, along with Bel Air, it has been the area where Hollywood stars have “lived large” since the 1920s, Bloomberg reports..

But now, things are changing. Keeping Up With the Kardashians, which begins its 18th season next month on the E! network, has put a spotlight on another part of the Los Angeles metro area—Calabasas, a 13.7-square-mile area on the west side of the city.

This year, for the first time, the community of about 24,300 people has eclipsed Beverly Hills in Bloomberg’s annual ranking of the richest cities nationwide. The average household income in Calabasas is $194,010—more than twice the national average and about $4,000 higher than Beverly Hills, which has 34,600 residents.

Located about 25 miles west of downtown Los Angeles, Calabasas owes some of its success to the usual reasons: good schools, low crime, and open space. But the Kardashians’ reality TV show has had its own effect, showing that in Calabasas, the rich and famous can live normal lives without having to dodge paparazzi and tour buses every time they leave home.

“You’re not going to get tourists walking around Calabasas. UYou’re going to get the celebrities that live here, going to the gym and going to the supermarket,” Tomer Fridman, a luxury real estate agent who works with the Kardashians told Bloomberg “That’s why they live here — for the privacy.”

In recent decades, Calabasas and its even tonier neighbor to the north, Hidden Hills, have been transformed from sleepy suburbs into celebrity capitals.

The Calabasas Country Club cites the “celebrity factor” as a reason to move there. Kim Kardashian and Kanye West live in Hidden Hills, as does the rapper Drake. Actors Will Smith and Jada Pinkett-Smith keep a 150-acre Calabasas compound, while Justin Bieber sold his $7.2 million Spanish-style retreat in the city to Khloe Kardashian. Actress Katie Holmes just sold a home there for about $4 million, the Los Angels Times reported this week.

Another reason to look there? Real estate in Calabasas is relatively cheap compared with Beverly Hills. That’s the premium people pay to live in the city, Fridman said. The median home price in Calabasas is $1.19 million, while it’s $2.7 million in Beverly Hills, according to Zillow. What Westchester is to Manhattan, Calabasas is to Beverly Hills, Fridman said.

Although the Kardashians first started taping their show from Hidden Hills, which has about 2,000 residents, the family and some of its members also have lived in Calabasas. The clan called the city home from 2003 to 2005 before moving to a bigger place in Hidden Hills, according to the L.A. Times.  Kylie Jenner, the 22-year-old cosmetics mogul, bought her first house, a $2.7 million starter pad, in Calabasas in 2015.

So, it really depends which “in crowd” you want to be “in” with. After all Jennifer Anniston lives in Bel Air.

Research contact: @business

Facebook gets grief for including Breitbart in News tab

October 29, 2019

Can Facebook do anything that doesn’t draw fire from users, regulators, legislators, and the media? After years of complaints from American news outlets that the social media site has The Washington Post reports that Facebook has agreed to compensate at least some news organizations as part of a specialized “News” tab meant to steer users toward curated national and local news stories.

But the project immediately raised new controversy when it became known that Breitbart News—a Web outlet linked to right-wing causes that was once run by former Trump adviser Steve Bannonhad been included among the 200 media outlets participating in the program.

“Given that Facebook is putting actual news outlets in the same category as Breitbart, actual news outlets should consider quickly withdrawing from the program,” Angelo Carusone, the president of Media Matters for America, a liberal nonprofit media watchdog, told the Post.

At an event in New York to launch the project, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg defended Breitbart’s inclusion. “You want to include a breadth of content to make sure all different topics can be covered,” Zuckerberg said.

Other outlets participating include The Washington Post, The New York Times, News Corp., BuzzFeed News, Business Insider, Bloomberg News, Fox News, NBCUniversal, USA Today and the Los Angeles Times.

The News tab marks the latest iteration of Facebook’s approach to online news, the Post reports. Before January 2018, the company had been a leading distributor of news, but that role was dogged by the presence in its feed of false and misleading information, as well as by allegations that its news feed and other features tilted toward liberal viewpoints

Zuckerberg did not go into specifics about how different publishers would be compensated, and media analysts expressed skepticism that the arrangement will help the small and medium local outlets that have been most seriously undercut by the rise of online news distribution.

“The vast majority of local news outlets are not included, and that is part of the news ecosystem that’s most at risk,” David Chavern, the president and chief executive of the News Media Alliance, a trade association of news publishers, told The Washington Post.

Chavern called Facebook’s agreement to pay at least some news outlets for their content a step in the right direction, noting that tech platforms have been “uniquely unwilling to pay for news and quality journalism.”

The News tab already is available to more than 200,000 Facebook users in the United States, with a broader rollout planned for early next year. The new service, Facebook executives say, should make it easier for users to locate the day’s major headlines, as well as stories geared toward particular topics or locales.

The initiative could reach 20 million to 30 million people over a few years, Zuckerberg said.

 Research contact: @washingtonpost

On the West Coast, there’s a clandestine pickle club with a cult following

June 26, 2019

Pickles may not strike you as a super-popular food—but Americans consume more than nine pounds of pickles per person annually, according to Natural Harvest. Not only that, but whether they are dill, sweet, bread and butter, sour, half-sour, or garlic, more than 67% of U.S. households have a jar on-hand—and they purchase pickles on an average of every 53 days.

In fact, there’s even a Pickle of the Month Club that will ship “premium, artisan-style pickles every month” from “specialty and award-winning producers across the country.” The cost is about $25/month.

But for real pickle fanatics, there’s only one place to go—and few people know about it.

According to an exclusive report from The Los Angeles Times, for the last year and a half, Jessica Wang, a pastry chef-turned-fermentation enthusiast  who worked at State Bird Provisions in San Francisco and Lasa and Madcapra in Los Angeles, has supplied a cult pickle subscription under the name Picklé Pickle Co. to a small circle of brine-minded colleagues.

Each jar, the Times gushes, “is a subtle surprise of vegetables and aromatics, usually dry-salted rather than wet-brined: watermelon rind with chive blossoms; cauliflower with curry leaf, green peppercorn and sesame oil; jicama with calamansi and a hint of habanero; preserved lemons with mango leaf and Utah salt.”

And it’s actually cheaper than the pedestrian club that “anybody can buy into.” A quarterly subscription runs $25 for three half-pint jars.

“I love having them in my fridge because you can throw them in anything you’re making and they will immediately pep it up,” photographer and gallery owner Asha Schechter, one of Wang’s first subscribers, told the news outlet in a recent interview. “I also like seeing her transform things I see at the farmers market. It’s very inspiring.”

Wang said experimentation, volunteering with farmers through the Asian Pacific Islander Forward Movement, a stint with Cultured Pickle Shop in Berkeley and a retreat at the home of food activist Sandor Katz all paved the way for a future in pickles.

“It’s such a joy and I feel so alive after eating them,” she said. “And it’s something that I can spread to others.”

You can sign up for Wang’s workshops via @picklepickle.co on Instagram.

Research contact: @latimes