Posts tagged with "Languages"

Left holding the baby: What it takes to be a $200,000-a-year nanny

June 20, 2019

Childcare isn’t usually a high-paying position. However, today wealthy and celebrity parents are seeking nannies from a higher echelon—nursemaids with all of the skills of Mary Poppins and then some.

Indeed, they will beat the bushes to find a nanny that is trained in newborn care, child development, technology, and languages. And they are willing to pay six figures, when they find her (or him).

In demand, according to a recent CNN report, are top-tier, career nannies who have specializations, certifications, and loads of experience. They can make from $150,000 to nearly $200,000 in big cities like New York, Los Angeles, and London. And sometimes even more.

Families are paying over $220,000 a year in San Francisco,” says Anita Rogers, president and founder of British American Household Staffing, which has offices in all three cities. “There’s a value in paying well for your employees, especially in your household.”

“We’ve seen a lot of requests for Mandarin and French speakers in the nanny role,” Keith Greenhouse, chief executive of the New York City-based household staffing company Pavillion Agency told the network news outlet. “Lately more than ever people want someone who is tech savvy and nannies who can move into a family assistant role.”

“Many of our families don’t want any screen time for the kids,” Ryan Jordan, founder of Educated Nannies, a staffing agency in Los Angeles. “So that’s the time the nanny needs to bring in preschool curriculum and adventures.”

At Educated Nannies, childcare providers need to have college degrees and families appear to be most interested in candidates with backgrounds in child development

But while a preschool teacher makes $13 to $15 an hour, or around $30,000 a year according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, skilled nannies are commanding more than double.

Heidi Joline has worked as a nanny for nearly 20 years. But she wasn’t always so sure childcare was the right career for her, she told CNN. “Saying you’re a nanny doesn’t get that ‘Oh! You’re a nanny? That’s so exciting!’ reaction from people,” she says. “It’s like “Oh, you’re a nanny. When are you going to get a real job?”

But after trying office work for a bit, she returned to being a nanny and realized she could grow in a way that was interesting to her, valuable to her families—and a lot more lucrative than teaching preschool.

She has passed the International Nanny Association Exam, taken Yale courses on child rearing and Stanford courses on health across the gender spectrum. She has studied child psychology, newborn care, and resilience following trauma.

Currently working with a family in Los Angeles, Joline prepares a curriculum every month for the preschooler for whom she is responsible. This month’s theme is bugs, and she has planned a lineup of songs, stories and activities along with learning words in Spanish, French and Mandarin. She and the child even released 3,000 ladybugs into the wild.

“In this field, things change all the time,” Joline told the network news outlet. “What we did with our children five years ago is not what we’re doing now with regard to nutrition, socialization, education, and overall well-being. You have to keep up with that to help inform the parents.”

And her skills have not gone unnoticed: she was named 2019 Nanny of the Year by the International Nanny Association.

“As a nanny you have to have those specialties and you have to continue your education,” Joline says. “In other places, it may be fine to just have CPR training, but if you’re in the bigger markets, where you are expecting higher pay and working with higher-profile people, you need specialized skills to stand out.”

Research contact: @CNN

Dad creates entertaining board game bed sheets for hospitalized children

May 7, 2019

After visiting a friend’s sick child in the hospital, Kevin Gatlin, a father himself, had an innovative idea—to create a way for hospitalized kids to learn and have fun while they are confined to bed all day. Now, his company, Playtime Edventures of Monroe, North Carolina, is entertaining kids nationwide, regardless of their circumstances, with interactive bedding and slumber bags.

The idea to make game-themed bed sheets came from a visit to the hospital, but was sparked by a family tradition. “Because of space, my wife would use our son’s bed as a desk,” Gatlin, who is from Charlotte, North Carolina, told CBS News. “They would do homework, play games or just watch movies. But, it wasn’t until I visited [a child] hospitalized for a long period of time did I realize that there was very little stimulation for kids confined to their hospital beds and rooms.”

Gatlin’s mother is a retired teacher, and she suggested making the games on the bed sheets educational. Gatlin enlisted the help of three teachers, a child physiologist and a family doctor to create Playtime Therapy Bed Sheets, which “provide kids a place where they could play, learn, sleep and heal.” According to Gatlin, it took more than two years to design the sheets, which have over 50 interactive games printed on them.

Each part of the bedding supports different types of learning. The pillows feature images and sentences that encourage kids to create stories. The flat sheet features giant board games, positive affirmations and colorful shapes. The fitted sheet is covered in mazes, word finding puzzles, games like checkers and tic-tac-toe, four different languages, math, grammar and geography.

“I wanted the sheets to have so many things for kids to do that they would never get bored playing with them,” Gatlin said. For game pieces, kids can use ordinary objects like coins or paper, or printable cut-outs from the Playtime Edventures website.

Donating has always been an important part of the company — Gatlin’s first order of bedding was donated to the Charlotte (North Carolina) Salvation Army for Women and Children.

Now, people all over the country buy the bedding to donate to children’s hospitals and hospices, shelters, juvenile centers, orphanages, group homes and summer camps. Bed sheets even can be purchased at a reduced cost ($24.99) and directly donated to hospitals and shelters.

Gatlin said the feedback has been overwhelmingly positive from both parents and hospital staff. “I’m truly happy my rbed sheets have provided a valuable service to those who deserve it,” he said. “The blessings in life come from giving not receiving.”

Gatlin still has a few more ideas on how his bed sheets can reach even more people. “I would love the opportunity to speak with the Red Cross and FEMA about providing our bed sheets during natural disasters,” he said. “Seeing families confined to shelters with nothing to do — I believe our bed sheets could provide some distraction during those hard times.”

Research contact: @CBSNews