Posts tagged with "Kansas City Chiefs"

How he does it: Tom Brady’s extreme diet and fitness routines

February 9, 2021

On February 7, Tom Brady broke his own record as the oldest QB ever—at age 43—to win a Super Bowl; when his Tampa Bay Buccaneers took on the reigning champs, the Kansas City Chiefs, on the Bucs’ home turf, defeating them 31-9.

According to NBC News, “The game was supposed to be an epic battle of the ages, pitting the all-time great Brady against Patrick Mahomes, 25, widely regarded as the best young quarterback in the game.”

But it obviously didn’t work out that way, as the Buccaneers took a decisive lead in the first half and never lost it.

Suffice it to say, The New York Post reports, “Brady is one of a kind, a phenomenon who shows no sign of slowing down any time soon in a sport where longevity is rare.”

But how does Brady do it? The Post notes that he follows a stringent diet, exercise, and study routine—not only to keep in shape, but to exceed expectations on every level.

Put simply, Brady is an obsessive—a man with a plan and the determination (and money) to execute it, as John Burns, CEO of Brady’s TB12 health and wellness organization, explains.

“Tom’s sustained success over the past 20-plus years is a testament to his incredible drive and his meticulous approach to everything he does.” Burns says. “It’s that mindset that allows him to keep going.”

Here’s how he does it, according to the Post:

Daily schedule

  • 5:30 a.m.:  Wake up, drink electrolyte water and smoothie
  • 7 a.m.: Breakfast with family
  • 8 – 10:30 a.m.: Hit the gym for strengthening and conditioning
  • 10 a.m:  Beach time
  • 11 a.m.:  Review game footage
  • Noon: Lunch
  • 3 -5  p.m.: Team practice or, in the off-season, surf and workout
  • 5-6 p.m.: Post-workout pliability session
  • 6 p.m:  Dinner with family
  • 7 p.m.: Review films, strategy w/ Coach, charity work
  • 7:30 p.m.: Family time, including reading to kids
  • 8:30 p.m.: Lights out and sleep

Fitness

It’s been said that trainer Alex Guerrero knows Tom Brady’s body better than the QB’s wife, Gisele Bündchen. As well as being his business partner in the TB12 health-and-wellness brand—including a chain of fitness centers that they plan to expand nationwide—Guerrero has  been described by Brady as his “body engineer,” the Post says.

He’s micromanaged the athlete’s training schedule month—and even year—in advance. An average day will begin early with a pre-workout “deep force” massage session with Guerrero. It only lasts four minutes, but targets 20 muscle groups for around 20 seconds each. It helps prepare Brady’s body for an intense workout, beginning with 40 minutes of resistance bands, to make muscles more pliable, soft, and resilient.

As the quarterback has aged, he works out less with weights, which could leave him prone to muscle tears. Now it’s all about planks, lunges and squats, followed by more pliability exercises, such as doing crunches with a vibrating roller beneath his back.

After, there’s another massage, this time with the focus of flushing out the lactic acid that builds up during exercise, to help improve muscle recovery time.

During the NFL season, he’ll work out with teammates in the afternoon. Off season, he might get in some surfing. There’s also another pliability session, to improve muscle recovery time, before bed.

Diet

First thing every morning, Brady has a smoothie. His favorite is made with blueberries and banana, hemp and chia seeds, walnuts, almond butter and hemp milk. He’ll also start drinking electrolyte water.

While there’s no denying that Brady’s spartan diet has played a major part in prolonging his playing career, some of his former New England Patriots teammates thought it obsessive and unappetizing — or as one put it, “that birdseed s–t.”

Caffeine is off the table. So is white flour, white sugar, dairy products and anything with gluten. He steers clear of veggies—tomatoes, eggplants, peppers, mushrooms —that could cause inflammation. Everything has to be organic. Brady each day tries to drink “a couple of hundred ounces” of water, usually enhanced with electrolytes. (He sells those, along with various nutritional supplements, through his TB12 site.)

Allen Campbell was Brady’s personal chef from 2013 to 2016; and helped him to create the TB12 Nutrition Manual, published in 2017. He told the Post that, at this time of year, “We focused on dark leafy greens, some grass-fed animal protein as well as legumes and whole grains.”

But that’s not what Brady will eat before the Super Bowl. His game-day meals are even more basic: a smoothie and a sandwich of almond butter and jelly.

It’s all a far cry from his rookie season in 2000; Brady admitted that his pregame snack used to be nachos while his default lunch was ham-and-cheese subs with onion rings and a large orange soda.

Brady sticks to an 80/20 (plant-based/animal protein) diet. Even his favorite ice cream is plant-based; made from avocado with a little cacao mixed in, so it tastes like chocolate.

Mind

Besides having worked with a life coach in the past,   Brady practices transcendental meditation, striving to become what Guerrero has described as “emotionally stable and ­spiritually nourished.”

He’s also had neuroscans so he can better understand the way his brain processes information and create strategies to improve that.

Brady exercises his brain using apps such as BrainHQ. Although the app was designed to help those with brain conditions such as cognitive damage or memory loss, Brady has used it to sharpen his reactions—working his way through two dozen brain games or more each day.

“Tom explained it like this,” said Henry Mahncke, CEO of the app’s creators, Posit Science. “When he gets the [ball], he remembers the play, then he has to scan the field, locate the receivers, figure out which ones are on their routes and which are open, and make the pass. All in about three seconds.”

Sleep

Finally, the Post reports, Brady loves sleeping. Before his first Super Bowl in 2002, he even took a nap in the locker room only to be woken up with just 12 minutes left before the Patriots were due on the field.

These days, he hits the hay at 8:30  each night and wakes at 5:30 a.m. But everything has to be right. From sleeping on a mattress with a layer of diamond memory foam to setting the bedroom thermostat to between 60 degrees and 65 degrees and shutting down all digital distractions at least 30 minutes before he retires, Brady is as obsessive about sleep as he is about, well, everything else in his life.

And then there’s his magic pajamas: bioceramic-infused sleepwear made by Under Armour to increase energy, promote recovery and improve performance. And you can, too, can sleep like Tom, although a complete set will set you back nearly $200.

Research contact: @newyorkpost

Ad Age: Five big trends in Sunday’s Super Bowl LV commercials

February 8, 2021

When the Kansas City Chiefs and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers hit the turf at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, Florida on February 7 for Super Bowl LV, many viewers will be watching the advertising spots as avidly as they watch the plays.

According to an analysis by Ad Age, this year, there’s no question that the pandemic has affected what we’ll see during the commercial breaks. From who is in—and out—of the Big Game, to the tone of the spots and who is being featured, this year’s commercials are poised to look vastly different. Among the trends we’ll be watching are the following, the global media brand predicts:

Big void. There will be a void in some typical Super Bowl categories: Think soda, cars, and movies. Neither Coke nor Pepsi will air commercials for their flagship cola brands; nor will automakers Hyundai and Kia light up the screens with their latest models. Currently, just five car commercials from three nameplates (as well as Vroom, the online auto dealership), are expected to run.

 Super Bowl LV also will be light on trailers for blockbuster movies, as many theaters remain shuttered and productions continue to be delayed. Last year, Universal Pictures, Walt Disney Studios, Marvel, and MGM all aired commercials. Currently, Walt Disney Studios is the only studio expected to air trailers during the game, although it remains to be seen if any others have bought in.

Of course, the biggest brand to announce its absence on game day is Budweiser, which will be watching the Super Bowl from the sidelines for the first time in 37 years. Other brands sitting out include Avocados From Mexico, breaking its six-year streak; and Hulu, which has aired commercials during the last four games.

Newbies. Nineteen marketers set to make their Big Game debuts, compared to 11 first-time advertisers last year, Ad Age reports.

Brands like Scotts Miracle-Gro, e-commerce platform Mercari, online job site Indeed, online car dealership Vroom, online freelance platform Fiverr, DraftKings, DoorDash and Uber Eats, saw their businesses grow in 2020 thanks to a shift in consumer behavior amid lockdowns. Similarly, buy now, pay later firm Klarna and trading app Robinhood also have witnessed a change to how people want to conduct their finances.

While it’s likely most of these companies won’t turn into regular Super Bowl advertisers, their presence this year will certainly serve as an opportunity to put some of these brands on the map.

Small business support. As part of their Super Bowl campaigns, several marketers are showing their support for local and small businesses, which have been particularly bruisedfby COVID-19.

 DoorDash’s commercial celebrates the businesses in your neighborhood with a new take on the Sesame Street classic song “The Neighborhood,” while Uber Eats is looking to persuade Super Bowl viewers to eat local with its ad reuniting “Wayne’s World’s” Wayne and Garth.  Klarna is supporting small, women-owned and minority-owned businesses in its social media push around its Western-themed ad.

What’s more, part of Verizon’s campaign will aim to help small businesses achieve long-term survival. It includes a benefit concert immediately following the Super Bowl headlined by Alicia Keys, Eric Church, H.E.R, Brittany Howard, Luke Bryan, Brandi Carlisle, and Jazmine Sullivan.

Inclusivity. Amid the renewed social justice movement, some 2021 Big Game advertisers have worked to become more diverse in the creation and production of their ads. There’s still a long way to go, but more brands have made some strides this year.

Amazon’s Alexa is embodied by actor Michael B. Jordan, who is backed up by  a predominantly Black cast. Several prominent Black stars—among them, Don Cheadle, Daveed Diggs and Lil Nas X—star in commercials for Michelob Ultra, DoorDash and Logitech, respectively.

Dan Levy, who represents the LGBTQ+ community, is featured in M&M’s spot. And Toyota tells the story of Paralympian Jessica Long.

In its first-ever Super Bowl ad, ndeed features a diverse group of job seekers—nearly all of whom are real people using the site. The message: Indeed finds jobs for all people.”

Nostalgia. From remakes of classic songs to some unlikely pairings, Super Bowl advertisers will look to bring viewers back to some happier times. Cheetos plays on Shaggy’s 2000 hit “It Wasn’t Me” for a humorous ad starring celebrity couple Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis, who illustrate  how to try to convince someone else you didn’t swipe their snacks.

 In other spots, Uber Eats reboots “Wayne’s World,” which rose to fame on “Saturday Night Live” in the late 1980s.  Dolly Parton turned her iconic “9 to 5” song into an anthem for the side-hustle in Squarespace’s ad with the title “5 to 9.” And a grown-up version of “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star” is the soundtrack to Shift4Shop’s Super Bowl ad promoting its sponsorship of the first civilian mission to space.

Finally, Bud Light resurrects some of its classic Super Bowl ad characters, like “I love you man” guy, Dr. Galazkiewicz, the “Real Men of Genius” singer and Cedric the Entertainer, who last appeared in a Bud Light Big Game ad in 2005.

Research contact: @adage

Newborns suit up like Chiefs at Kansas City hospital

February 4, 2020

They might have been born yesterday (well, Sunday)—but they already have winning fashion sense: The University of Kansas Health System dressed some infants who arrived in time for the Super Bowl kickoff in tiny Chiefs uniforms—creating a sea of red in the hospital’s neonatal intensive care unit.

“Because we treat them like Chiefs, they dressed the part!” the Kansas City-based hospital posted on Facebook, adding, “In celebration of the upcoming Super Bowl and an impending visit from [official Chiefs Mascot] KC Wolf and Chiefs Ambassador Shawn Barber (and with permission from their parents), our NICU babies were dressed as The Kansas City Chiefs players.”

According to a report by Fox News, the mini Chiefs were photographed wearing tiny wigs and team gear, including jerseys, wristbands, and pompoms. One infant even rocked a Chiefs bow tie.

The adorable photos warmed the hearts of Facebook users, generating 377,000 “likes” on the social media site by Monday.

“Cheers to the Chiefs fighting hard Sunday like these beautiful babies do each day!! Prayers to the families of each and every one of these tiny miracle[s],” one Facebook user commented on the post.

Research contact: @FoxNews