Posts tagged with "Ipsos poll"

56% of Americans say Trump should be convicted, barred from holding federal office

February 9, 2021

With his impeachment trial set to begin on February 9, a majority of Americans—56%—say they want the Senate to convict former President Donald Trump and to bar him from holding federal office ever again, according to findings of a new ABC News/Ipsos poll released Sunday.

The new poll was conducted by Ipsos in partnership with ABC News, using Ipsos’ KnowledgePanel.

Compared to public attitudes during the early days of the former president’s first impeachment trial, support for the Senate conviction is higher now. In an ABC News/Washington Post poll published in late January 2020—when the first trial was ongoing, but before senators had voted—47% of Americans said the Senate should vote to remove Trump from office and 49% said he should not be removed.

On January 13, Trump became the first president ever to be impeached by the House of Representatives twice, when a majority of the body’s members voted in favor of charging Trump with “incitement of insurrection” for his role in the January 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol.

A key difference between this trial and the first is that Trump is no longer president and therefore cannot be removed from office. All but five Republican senators have gone on the record saying they think the trial is unconstitutional because of this fact. Still, Democrats have argued that failing to hold Trump accountable would signal to future presidents that they can evade punishment for their actions, as long as they come at the end of their term in office.

It would take 67 senators to vote to convict Trump—meaning 17 Republicans would need to be on board, assuming every member of the Democratic caucus votes to convict, ABC notes. If enough senators vote to convict, the chamber could hold a second vote on whether to bar him from holding federal office again. That would only take a simple majority.

A few Republican senators have said, or have reportedly said, that they think Trump committed an impeachable offense. Yet, none has said definitively that he or she will vote to convict the ex-president. But unlike the first impeachment, when no Republicans voted to impeach Trump in the House, 10 Republicans joined Democrats this time, including the chair of the House Republican Conference, Liz Cheney.

Among Democrats, support for Trump’s conviction is nearly universal in the ABC News/Ipsos poll, with 92% in favor. Independents mirror the full population, with 54% in support of the Senate convicting Trump and prohibiting him from holding office, and 45% against.

Research contact: @abcnews

Trump blows off talk of hurricanes during FEMA meeting

June 8, 2018

During a closed-door meeting with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) on June 6 meant to ensure preparedness for the 2018 hurricane season—which is predicted to be a nasty one, with as many as five major named storms on the East and Gulf coasts—President Donald Trump did not focus on recent or projected gales, The Washington Post reported.

Leaked audio from the 40-minute meeting at FEMA headquarters captured Trump musing about everything but the weather, according to the Post, including, “his prowess in negotiating airplane deals, his popularity, the effectiveness of his political endorsements, the Republican Party’s fortunes, the vagaries of Defense Department purchasing guidelines, his dislike of magnetized launch equipment on aircraft carriers, his unending love of coal and his breezy optimism about his planned Singapore summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.”

While speaking to the cameras for about 15 minutes, Trump briefly mentioned Puerto Rico; where the Department of Health now estimates that there were about 1,400 additional deaths following Hurricane Maria—bringing the death toll up from the initial estimate of 64.

The Trump administration was roundly criticized for its performance at that time—and still, hundreds of thousands in the U.S. territory continue to live and work without electricity.

Indeed, an Ipsos poll conducted last October found that over three-quarters of American approve of the federal disaster response for both Hurricane Harvey in Texas (78%) and Hurricane Irma in Florida (78%), but only 56% of Americans approve of the response in Puerto Rico following Hurricane Maria. Republicans are significantly more likely to approve of the responses in Texas (91%), Florida (90%) and in Puerto Rico (82%). Three-quarters of Democrats also approve of the response in Texas (75%) and Florida (75%), but just 40% of Democrats approve of the response in Puerto Rico, while 38% strongly disapprove of the response.

Trump did, however, thank FEMA officials and Cabinet members for their response to last year’s hurricane season. “We really appreciate the job you’ve done. I want to thank you very much,” he said.

Research contact: julia.clark@ipsos.com

UN Human Rights Office condemns U.S. separation of immigrant children and parents

June 7, 2018

The current policy in the United States of separating “extremely young children” from their asylum-seeker or migrant parents along the country’s southern border “always constitutes a child rights violation,” the United Nations Human Rights Office of the High Commissioner (OHCHR), said on June 5.

Since last October, “several hundred” youngsters —including a 12-month-old infant— have been separated from their families while their parents serve out prison sentences for entering the U.S. illegally, or wait in detention while their asylum claims are processed, OHCHR spokesperson Ravina Shamdasani said at a press conference in Geneva, Switzerland..

She said OHCHR had received information on cases dating from last October; although the policy had begun in January 2017 when the newly inaugurated president, Donald Trump, issued two executive orders related to migration.

The current separation of children “was a direct consequence of that decision,” Shamdasani said, adding that the policy is applied to asylum-seekers and other migrants “in vulnerable situations.” She noted that a class action has been brought by the American Civil Liberties Union, on behalf of hundreds of parents—mainly from Central and Latin American countries—who have been separated from their children.

Shamdasani noted that there is “nothing normal about detaining children”, and that it “… is never in the best interests of the child and always constitutes a child rights violation”.

And on the legal issue of entering a country “without the right papers”, the UN human rights office spokesperson insisted that it should not be a criminal offence and “does not warrant jailing children”.

Once separated from their parents, Shamdasani said that children are often transferred into the care of the U.S. Office of Refugee Resettlement, and that efforts are made to find them a temporary guardian. When their parents are released, youngsters are reunited with them and deported back to their country of origin. For the majority this means to Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador, where “rampant insecurity and violence” has forced them to flee, she explained.

In a call for an end to the practice, Shamdasani noted that the United States “generally held in high regard” the rights of children.

And although it is the only UN Member State not to have ratified the Convention on the Rights of the Child, it had signed the international accord and ratified others, which meant that it had legal obligations to children in its car, the OHCHR spokesperson explained.

For its own part, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security says 700 children have been separated from their parents since the fiscal year began last October. In making the case for the program early last month, Attorney General Jeff Sessions said, “If you are smuggling a child then we will prosecute you, and that child will be separated from you as required by law,” NBC News reported. Sessions added, “If you don’t like that, then don’t smuggle children over our border.”

Administration officials explained that the goal of the program is 100% prosecution of all who enter the U.S. illegally. When adults are prosecuted and jailed, their children will be separated from them, just as would happen for a U.S. citizen convicted and jailed.

President Trump, himself, has said that the Democrats are to blame, because they will not fund his wall at the southern border.

Based on findings of an Ipsos poll conducted in February, fewer than one in five Democrats (18%) support building a wall or fence along the entire U.S.-Mexico border, while two-thirds of Republicans (68%) support the measure. A majority of Republicans (63%) also support a movement to end the ability of legal immigrants to bring extended family members to the United States compared to 30% of Democrats and 49% of Independents.

Notably, two-thirds of all Americans (65%) support giving legal status to undocumented or illegal immigrants brought to the United States as children, although partisan differences are still evident. Half of Republicans (51%) support this plan, along with two-thirds of Independents, and 81% of Democrats.

Research contact: @ipsosus