Posts tagged with "Influencers"

Kould it be true? ‘Keeping Up With the Kardashians’ is ending after 20 seasons

September 11, 2020

After a 20-season, 14-year run marked by marriages, divorces, births, deaths, affairs, plastic surgeries, gender-change surgery, world travel; and selfies of every variety, as well as tears and laughs, Keeping Up With the Kardashians announced on September 7 that the TV show’s last season on the E! Network is scheduled to start in early 2021.

 “It is with heavy hearts that we say goodbye to ‘Keeping Up With the Kardashians,’ ” the network said in a statement in conjunction with Kris Jenner, the Kardashian siblings (Kim, Kourtney, Khloe, and Rob), the Jenner sisters (Kylie and Kendall); and, naturally, Scott Disick. “We are beyond grateful to all of you who’ve watched us for all of these years — through the good times, the bad times, the happiness, the tears, and the many relationships and children. We’ll forever cherish the wonderful memories and countless people we’ve met along the way.”

The family thanked E!, the production team at Bunim/Murray; and Ryan Seacrest, who has been an executive producer on the show since the beginning.

E! released an official statement to Variety, regarding the ending of the monumental show that helped define the network as a destination beyond entertainment news.“E! has been the home and extended family to the Kardashian-Jenners for what will be 14 years, featuring the lives of this empowering family,” the network’s statement reads. “Along with all of you, we have enjoyed following the intimate moments the family so bravely shared by letting us into their daily lives. While it has been an absolute privilege and we will miss them wholeheartedly, we respect the family’s decision to live their lives without our cameras.”

“KUWTK” has been a massive hit globally for the network, which airs repeats of the franchise constantly — and pays a pretty penny for those rights. In 2017, E! inked a mega-deal with the family for a three-year extension, taking the show through 2020, valued at nine figures. At the time, insiders told Variety that the renewal deal was worth “below $100 million,” although other reports stated that the deal was worth up to $150 million.

The show turned the Kardashian-Jenner family into international superstars—with a multimedia empire complete with clothing lines, cosmetics companies, apps and never-ending tabloid interest in their every move. When the show debuted, Kris Jenner, now known as one of the savviest businesswomen in the industry, was known to the public as the ex-wife of O.J. Simpson attorney Robert Kardashian. Her former spouse, Olympian [Bruce] Caitlyn Jenner also ended up starring in her own E! spinoff, “I Am Cait, which documented her transition into a transgender woman.

According to Variety, when the show hit the air, the family was best known for Kim Kardashian-West’s sex tape, which brought worldwide attention to the socialite—whom previously had been Paris Hilton’s sidekick. Today, Kardashian-West is one of the most recognizable faces on the planet, and has taken her power to the White House with her passion for criminal justice reform. Meanwhile, Kendall and Kylie Jenner were just kids when the show first started airing, and now are two of the most powerful—and lucrative—influencers in the world.

At the time of the series’ 10-year anniversary in 2017, Kris Jenner spoke to Variety about the show’s milestones and futures. In that interview, she spoke about when the time might come to end the show, saying, “I used to just joke and say it’ll be when Kylie gets married in 20 years, and here we are 10 years later. Who thought a decade later we would still be going as strong as we are?”

The famous family members posted about the show ending on their social media accounts, which reach hundreds of millions of fans.

Kardashian-West posted to her 188 million followers: “Without ‘Keeping Up with The Kardashians,’ I wouldn’t be where I am today. I am so incredibly grateful to everyone who has watched and supported me and my family these past 14 incredible years,” she wrote. “This show made us who we are and I will be forever in debt to everyone who played a role in shaping our careers and changing our lives forever.”

Research contact: @Variety

The meaning behind the #FilterDrop campaign you’re seeing on Instagram

September 9, 2020

While “authenticity” is highly valued these days, you wouldn’t know it by looking at social media: Just as many women wouldn’t leave the house without some form of makeup, many Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter users wouldn’t post a selfie without a filter.

In the age of image-altering apps like Facetune and seemingly flawless influencers, many would likely admit to being filter-dependent. In fact, according to a survey results posted by Bustle, fully one-third (33%) of girls and young women will not post selfies online without using a filter. 

The findings, published by the UK-based charity Girlguiding, highlighted that two out of five of the young women (40%) surveyed “feel upset” that they can’t look like the way they do online.

Between influencer culture and social media ads and posts, more than half of the girls said they have seen ads that have made them “feel pressured to look different”—and this figure is higher for girls who identify as LGBTQ.

The findings also revealed girls from Black, Asian, and minority backgrounds are “more likely” than their white peers not to use social media “because of fear of criticism of their bodies.”

As part of their 2020 survey, which spoke to more than 2,000 young women aged 11-21, Bustle reports that Girlguiding is calling out the apps, filters, and online adverts that “knock girls’ confidence.”

In reaction, a new #FilterDrop campaign has emerged online—but what is it and how is it helping?

UK-based model and make-up artist Sasha Louise Pallari launched the #FilterDrop campaign after noticing influencers “advertising a makeup brand with a beautifying filter on.” Taking to Instagram, the 28-year-old claims “false advertising” in this way is contributing to low self-esteem.

“I so strongly wish you would realize the vast scale of damage the constant use of filters are,” she wrote in the caption. “Flawless, poreless, scarless, wrinkle-less skin does not exist and it’s only because of the overuse of these [filters] we believe it does.”

In a video posted to her Instagram page, the model showcased how drastically different filters can make you look. In the clip, she’s seen heavily filtered and with her “normal skin.”

And, following the response to her filter-free images, Pallari has since devoted her Instagram page to normalizing skin blemishes on the app, as well as exposing the deceptive nature of filters.

She writes in another post: “Please think about what using filters all the time is doing to our already damaged society. A LOT of money is made from us not feeling good enough. So let this be a reminder that your pores, wrinkles and the texture on your skin are beautiful, yet still the least interesting things about you.”

The model also questioned the lasting damage filters could have on children who may base their self-worth on “how beautiful they are” and “the filter they need in order to even be beautiful.”

It’s a legitimate concern.

People seem to be watching. The #FilterDrop campaign page on Instagram now shows hundreds of photos of people ditching the filter and sharing what they really look like. Here’s hoping for a more unfiltered reality.

Research contact: @bustle

Bloomberg launches Screentime, a digital hub about the business of entertainment

April 15, 2020

On April 14, Bloomberg announced the launch of Screentime—a weekly newsletter about the entertainment industry that will feature coverage on television and movies, music and podcasting, eSports and video games, and influencers.

Screentime is the latest in a series of similarly structured verticals coming out of Bloomberg—among them, Hyperdrive for the auto and mobility industry; and Prognosis, for the healthcare industry.

In addition to featuring trend stories and narratives, Screentime will cover the biggest news stories of the moment: In the first issue, Bloomberg discusses how COVID-19 currently is affecting every aspect of the entertainment industry.

In addition, a unique new feature of the newsletter will be Bloomberg’s Pop Star Power Ranking, a list of the 25 biggest pop stars in the world, updated weekly.

Content from Screentime will be available first to subscribers of Bloomberg Terminal , the company’s premium data and breaking news subscription portal.

Research contact: @business

Recipe cards go digital with a little help from CuratorCrowd

April 9, 2019

Does your family have its own set of cherished, hand-written recipe cards, passed down from generation to generation? Now, there’s another reason to value them dearly: Thanks to Nashville-based CuratorCrowd, they soon may be obsolete.

On April 8, CuratorCrowd, a division of American Hometown Media, launched its  Recipe Box Plugina traffic and engagement platform built specifically for food blogs and websites. The Recipe Box Plugin enables users to easily save and curate recipes and content from any participating site on the web directly to the cloud—becoming a central food-related repository that gets frequent return traffic.

Once saved to the Recipe Box, recipes are easily searchable and users can create collections (folders) to better manage and organize recipes. They can also easily filter recipes by source/website.

Prior to this week, the Recipe Box was not available to other sites on the web. American Hometown Media has its own  Just a Pinch Food Group—a select group of food-only bloggers.

However, now, other culinary sites can take advantage of what the box offers—nearly a decade of usage and proof of concept (over 2 million active recipe boxes and more than 24 million saved recipes from over 24,000 publishers).

“As the food technology/media vertical matures, users are looking for online tools to enhance and make their lives easier,” says Dan Hammond, CEO of American Hometown Media. “The Recipe Box Plugin does that while helping food influencers and publishers build their brands and user engagement. That sounds like a recipe for success.”

The technology to power the Recipe Box Plugin is free to online publishers, websites, and food bloggers, and can be easily installed in minutes, the company claims.

Over the next year AHM plans to roll out new products in the CuratorCrowd platform— including a food-specific trending content recipe exchange, a syndicated content engine, and Recipe Box TV, which will channel and monetize video content into popular streaming platforms to build brand awareness and revenue. Future enhancements anticipated for the Recipe Box include ecommerce and shoppable recipes, as those solutions mature.

Research contact: @JustAPinchCooks