Posts tagged with "Gallup"

Democrats break barriers in August 14 primaries

August 16, 2018

When Democrats broke through barriers to elect Barack Obama to be the 44th U.S. president in 2008, that was only the beginning. Democratic voters selected a diverse array of history-making candidates in primaries across four states on August 14—including nominating a transgender woman for governor of Vermont, Politico reported.

Christine Hallquist, a former energy executive at Vermont Electric Coop, would be the first openly transgender governor in America if she defeats GOP Governor Phil Scott in November. Meanwhile, former high school teacher Jahana Hayes is poised to become the first African-American Democrat to represent Connecticut in Congress after winning her primary in the 5th District; and in Minnesota, Ilhan Omar, a Muslim and a Somali immigrant who had been a state legislator, won the Democratic nomination for the 5th Congressional District.

The night of firsts came as Democrats also hope to rebuild their party in the Midwest, Politico said—especially in Wisconsin, where voters selected state education official Tony Evers to take on two-term Republican Gov. Scott Walker in the fall.

“It’s a classic midterm election where the ‘out’ party has a terrific opportunity to win,” Democratic pollster Paul Maslin told the political news outlet. “That’s what happened the other way in 2010 and 2014. Now it’s our turn. We don’t want to go overboard but I think we are very hopeful of reversing a lot of the Republican gains over the last several cycles.”

According to a poll taken by Gallup in June, the Democratic edge in party affiliation over the GOP has grown to seven percentage points-the largest it has been in over two years. During the late summer and fall of 2016, Democrats averaged a three-point advantage.

Research contact: datainquiry@gallup.com

Reminder: August 12 is ‘National Middle Child Day’

August 12, 2018

If you didn’t know that National Middle Child Day is on August 12, chances are that the child who is second in birth order among your progeny will not be surprised. In fact, in families of five and more, it is not just folklore that the middle children tend to “slip between the cracks”—because attention continually is demanded by and directed to the oldest and youngest siblings in the household.

However, in recent years, there have been fewer children who are betwixt and between. In fact, researchers recently have pondered whether middle children have become an “endangered species,” according to a report by New York Magazine. Demographics show that, in the past few decades, nearly two-thirds of women have reacted to time and money crunches by having fewer offspring. Most women now have just one or two children—i.e., an oldest, a youngest, but no middle.

Yet new data on the number of children that Americans perceive as “ideal”—at least in theory, if not in practice—suggest that middle-child families could be making a comeback: Roughly four-in-ten U.S. adults (41%) think families of three or more children are ideal, a share rivaling that of around two decades ago, according to findings of a Gallup poll released on July 6.

When it comes to the number of children that U.S. women actually are having during their lifetime, it’s still much more common for women at the end of their childbearing years to have had one or two kids, rather than three or more, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data. In 2016, about six-in-ten U.S. mothers ages 40 to 44 (62%) had given birth to one or two children, while just 38% had three or more. That’s roughly the inverse of 1976, when about two-thirds of mothers in this age range (65%) had three or more kids and 35% had one or two.

A sharp decrease in the share of mothers with four or more children has played a role in the long-term decline in larger families, according to the Census Bureau data. But, despite the dramatic decline of the four-child-plus family over the past few decades, the share of Americans who dream of four or more children as the ideal number is actually ticking upward.

In 2007, 9% of Americans said the ideal number of children is four or more, according to Gallup. That share grew following the Great Recession and now stands at 15%. In fact, since 2007, the increase in the average number of children Americans see as ideal is mainly due to a rise in the share of adults who think four or more kids is the ideal family size.

Among the factors affecting birth numbers is education: On average, the more education a mother has, the fewer children she will have in her lifetime, as previous Pew Research Center reports have shown. In combined data for 2014 and 2016, 46% of mothers ages 40 to 44 with a high school diploma or less had given birth to three or more children. By comparison, among mothers in the same age group with a postgraduate degree, 28% had given birth to three or more kids.

But the educational “gap” in fertility has somewhat narrowed in the past two decades, driven by declining childlessness and a rise in larger families among highly educated moms. The share of mothers ages 40 to 44 with at least a master’s degree and three or more children increased from two decades ago, as the share with just one child declined.

According to previous research by the Center, highly educated women are the only group with a declining share of one-child families and a rise in families of three or more.

When it comes to ideal family size, highly educated adults are again less likely to say having three or more children is ideal, according to Gallup. Among those with a postgraduate degree, 36% believe three or more kids are ideal, compared with 46% of those with no college education. However, since 2011, the share of Americans who see families of three or more children as ideal has risen among all levels of education.

Research contact: info@pewresearch.org

Karl Rove compares Trump to Stalin and advises him to ‘tone down’ anti-media rhetoric

August 8, 2018

Karl Rove, the Republican political consultant and policy advisor who is largely credited for the election of George W. Bush in 2000—and widely known for his proclivity for dirty tricks—advised President Donald Trump to cut out his “over the top” anti-media rhetoric during an appearance on Fox News on August 6, according to a same-day report by Mediaite.

Rove’s comments came after Trump took again to Twitter over the weekend, characterizing the news media as “the Enemy of the People,” and alleging, : “[They] purposely cause great division & distrust. They can also cause War! They are very dangerous & sick!”

In short, Mediaite said, Rove told Trump to suck it up. “I think this is over the top,” he said, adding, “. Every president has problems with the media. I was in the White House for seven years, I didn’t like the coverage they gave George W. Bush, particularly the liberal New York Times.”

Rove said the president should criticize the media “on a case-by-case basis,” and “make a respectful disagreement.

“I think calling names is not helpful to our country from any side,” said Bush’s former chief of staff. ”

The former White House official then addressed Trump’s use of the phrase “enemy of the people” to describe the press.

“That just grates on me,” he said. “I grew up during the time of the Cold War. That is a phrase that was used by [Communist leader] Stalin against the enemies of the communist regime. I think the president would be well advised to tone down the rhetoric.”

Rove went on to note that Trump’s disapproval ratings are high, and that he can’t simply appeal to his “hard-core” supporters at rallies.

According to Gallup, Trump currently has a 38% approval rating and a 57% disapproval rating.

Research contact: @aidnmclaughlin

Pope convenes Big Oil producers and investors to talk climate change

June 4, 2018

Pope Francis is hosting a gathering this week at the Vatican with executives of major oil producers and investment firms to discuss how their organizations can address climate change, Axios reported exclusively on June 1.

Three years ago, Pope Francis wrote his encyclical — a papal letter sent to all bishops of the Roman Catholic Church — on the importance of addressing climate change, a first in the church’s history.

Following U.S. President Donald Trump’s withdrawal from the Paris Agreement in June 2017, the meeting convened by the Pope promises to send a significant signal that the industry still intends to work with world leaders on global warming.

Among those who already have promised to attend are the following:

  • Larry Fink, CEO of BlackRock, the world’s largest asset manager;
  • Bob Dudley, CEO of BP;
  • Multiple sources said ExxonMobil would be represented, although a company spokesman was unable to confirm that to Axios;
  • Eldar Sætre, CEO of Equinor, an oil and energy producer partially owned by the Norwegian government (formerly Statoil);
  • Ernest Moniz, former U.S. Energy Secretary under then-President Barack Obama; and
  • Lord John Browne, former CEO of BP and current executive chairman of L1 Energy, an oil and gas investment firm.

The focus of the gathering, according to Axios, will be similar to that of the encyclical (“On Care For Our Common Home”)—with an emphasis on the energy transition of a “shared home.”

The news outlet notes that, while it surely will be a momentous and symbolic meeting, “it’s still just a meeting.” To what degree the Vatican gathering will prompt change and new developments remains a big question mark.

A 2018 poll by Gallup found that, although the POTUS is “all out” on climate change, the American public is “all in.” Fully 62% of U.S. adults contacted said that the government is doing too little about the environment—representing the highest percentage since 2006. The pollsters noted that the majority of Americans have prioritized the environment, even if it limits economic growth.

Research contact: datainquiry@gallup.com

Enthusiasm cools among employers for Summer Friday perks

May 29, 2018

Last Friday, many Americans hustled out of the office a little early to get their Memorial Day mojo going. However, while employers likely turned a blind eye to that particular holiday exodus, they won’t be so amenable on many weekends this summer. Based on several surveys, companies are cutting back on Summer Fridays this year, Mic reported on May 24.

New York City Staffing company OfficeTeam found that the number of employers offering the perk had declined precipitously— from 63% in 2012 to just 20% last year.  And that’s a shame, they said, because fully 30% of employees think leaving early for the weekend is the best of all office perks.

According to Gallup, the number of employees who are completely satisfied with their hours is actually trending down. In fact, a 2014 Gallup poll found that the 40-hour work week is no longer even close to operative; most office workers are at their desks for 47 hours a week, if not more.

But those longer hours don’t necessarily lead to greater productivity: A CNBC report in 2015 cited a Stanford University study that showed that “employee output falls after a 50-hour work week—and  sharply falls off a cliff after 55 hours.”

Worse yet, fully 40% of workers already are approaching that cliff, according to Gallup, and 20% of full-time workers log more than 60 hours per week.

Yet, based on a study conducted by the Harvard University School of Public Health, stress-related productivity loss amounts to about $30 billion for employers each year.

As Mic points out, employees are simply counting down the clock on Friday afternoons anyway, so why not let them go?

Of course, summer Fridays aren’t going to be an easy solution for every workforce, Mic writer James Dennin admits.

“But,” says Dennin,”the case is clear that Americans are overworked, office closures are the best way to get workers to take time off—and the best time to close an office is when it’s warm and sunny outside.”

Research contact: jdennin@mic.com

Few Americans read Trump’s tweets directly on Twitter

May 21, 2018

While 76% of Americans ultimately hear about @realDonaldTrump’s  tweets and the news they generate, few Americans say they read the POTUS’s tweets unfiltered, directly from Twitter (8%). Instead, most appear to read or learn about them indirectly, through either other social media or the broader news media, based on findings of a poll conducted by Gallup and released on May 16.

Trump views his use of Twitter as a way of sending unfiltered opinions and views directly to the public. In June 2017, Trump tweeted: “The FAKE MSM [mainstream media] is working so hard trying to get me not to use Social Media. They hate that I can get the honest and unfiltered message out.”

However, just 26% of Americans have a Twitter account, and 30% of that group—or 8% of the overall U.S. population— personally follow the president’s official Twitter account.

The corollary of the finding that relatively few Americans read Trump’s tweets directly on Twitter is that most of those who say they see, read or hear a lot or a fair amount about his tweets (69%) are getting their information from a secondary source. Some of their access to his tweets could be relatively straightforward, such as when a friend forwards a tweet or when a tweet is reprinted directly in a publication and the person reads only the tweet. But Americans’ awareness of Trump’s tweets is more commonly the result of an indirect, filtered dissemination.

Interestingly enough, Democrats are more likely than Republicans to say they see, read, or hear a lot about Trump’s tweets (64% vs. 50%, respectively). Democrats also edge out Republicans when including those who read a fair amount of his tweets: 84% of Democrats see, read or hear about at least a fair amount of the president’s tweets, compared with 77% of Republicans (and 71% of independents).

The major difference between Republicans and Democrats is among those following Trump’s tweets without having a Twitter account.

In some ways, then, Twitter functions for Trump much like an old-fashioned press release or press conference statement. Few Americans see or read his tweets directly, but many ultimately hear about them via media coverage or other means.

Research contact: datainquiry@gallup.com

Nearly 80% of South Koreans now trust Kim Jong Un

May 3, 2018

The rapprochement between South Korean President Moon Jae-in and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, which took place at the border between the two countries on April 27, has had a radical effect on the people of South Korea, Bloomberg reports.

Just over a month ago, the polling organization Gallup found that just 10% of South Koreans approved of Kim. However, findings of a poll of 1,023 South Koreans released on May 1 by the Korea Research Center, show that, now, 78% of respondents trust the controversial ruler.

In turn, The Week reports that Moon is well-liked in South Korea, where he has an 86% approval rating. Respondents to the Korea Research Center poll cited several key moments in the summit between the two leaders as impressive—including the pledge to denuclearize the Korean peninsula. Thirty percent of respondents said Moon’s decision to cross the border was the most impressive part.

Nearly 90% of South Koreans said the summit was a productive step forward.

Later this month, U.S. President Donald Trump may have the opportunity to create his own détente with Kim at the same location—the demilitarized zone separating the two Koreas. That site makes the most sense for the North Korean leader, News 4 Jacksonville reports, because media facilities and equipment already are in place.

Will the proposed Trump-Kim talks open up the Hermit State? Only time will tell.

Research contact: @Jee_vuh

55% say Amazon plays fair with USPS

April 10, 2018

President Donald Trump continues to harass Amazon—contending that the online shopping site pays the U.S. Postal Service too little to deliver its packages and is, therefore, ripping off taxpayers. But do the American people agree? That’s what Yahoo asked in a recent survey.

The Web-based news, email and search site released results on April 3 of a flash online survey of nearly 20,000 Yahoo Finance readers—which found that 55% say Trump is wrong and think Amazon plays fair. About 32% say Trump is right and think Amazon doesn’t play fair. Nearly 13% aren’t sure.

Yet Amazon is far more popular than Trump, at least among Yahoo Finance users. Overall, 70% of survey respondents have a positive impression of Amazon, compared with just 26% who have a positive impression of Trump. (In Gallup’s latest weekly survey, Trump’s approval rating is 39%.)

It is very unlikely Amazon has a sweetheart deal with the Postal Service that no other bulk shipper is able to get, Yahoo reports. By law, the Postal Service must break even on every contract for package delivery, at a minimum. It sets the rates Amazon pays; not Amazon. Given the volume Amazon ships, it’s more likely that Amazon is providing a valuable revenue stream to the Postal Service than taking it for a ride.

But Trump isn’t trying to win on facts. According to Yahoo, “He seems to despise Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, who owns The Washington Post, which is a frequent Trump critic. So Trump appears to be trying to damage Amazon, the source of Bezos’s immense wealth.”

And Trump has succeeded, at least temporarily, Yahoo says. Amazon shares have fallen by about 8% since Trump’s first Twitter attack on March 29—zapping about $58 billion in market value.

Trump supporters, not surprisingly, are more likely to agree with Trump and frown on Amazon. Of the 26% of survey respondents who said they have a positive impression of Trump, 77% agree with him about Amazon, and only 11% think he’s wrong. Here’s how the Trump supporters answered:

Trump, of course, may believe he’s winning if he manages to turn anybody against Amazon, which, Yahoo said, “he probably has, given that some of his core supporters line up behind just about any stance he takes.”

Research contact: @YahooFinance

MBAs are dissatisfied with their degrees

February 20, 2018

MBAs are among the least satisfied graduate students, based on findings of a Gallup study, which was released on February 16 and published by Poets and Quants. Fewer than half (42%) of students who earned MBA degrees between 2000 and 2015 thought that their graduate work was worth the cost.

And it only gets worse when the rate is compared across graduate degrees, according to Gallup.

The poll of more than 4,000 U.S. adults also included graduates earning doctoral degrees, medical degrees, law degrees, master’s of science, and master’s of arts degrees—and only one other degree had a lower rating among respondents than the MBA. That was the law degree, which had a “strongly agree [that it was valuable]” rate of only 23%. Considering the law degree’s rising costs and plummeting value in the market, that’s not good company

Doctoral degrees had the highest rate of satisfaction, at 64%; followed by medical degrees, at 58%.

Next, Gallup asked grads to rate how strongly they felt their graduate education prepared them for life after school. Again, only 23% strongly agreed that their MBA degrees prepared them well for life beyond B-school. (And again, only law graduates gave lower marks, at 20%.) This time, medical school graduates gave the highest marks, with exactly half strongly agreeing that their degree prepared them well for life after school.

“Likely contributing to their lower ratings of their degrees, postgraduates who received MBAs and those who received law degrees also are less likely than other postgraduate degree holders to report having had important support and experiential learning opportunities during their graduate programs,” the report reads.

Indeed, the results get even worse for the MBA when graduates were polled on their academic support and experiential learning opportunities. Asked whether their professors cared about them as people, only 19% of MBAs strongly agreed — lower than any other degree field. Again, those earning doctoral and medical degrees had the highest rates, at 37% and 35%, respectively.

 Just 14% of MBAs strongly agreed that they had a mentor who encouraged them to pursue their “goals and dreams” — again, lower than any other field. Medical degrees led the category with 54% and doctoral degrees followed with 49%.

But the study should be taken with a few grains of salt, the Gallup researchers advise. First, the poll size — around 4,000 people — is not a large universe considering it stretched across so many degree programs for so many years. And it’s important to remember that it spans a period that included the Great Recession, when an MBA was seen as less valuable if earned around that time. Lastly, Gallup doesn’t specify where the degrees were earned.

Gallup’s findings also run counter to what other recent studies have shown. Last year, for example, in its annual survey of business school alumni, the Graduate Management Admission Council found that 91% of 2016 graduates attained work within six months of graduating, with 88% saying their degree was key to getting their current job— and 96% rating their MBA’s value as “good” to “outstanding.” The GMAC survey, moreover, covers a broad range of schools from the top to the bottom of the rankings.

Research contactdatainquiry@gallup.com

The presidency personally affects mood of U.S. population

February 15, 2018

About half of Americans (52%) say “the person who is serving as president” (regardless of whom that happens to be) affects their overall happiness, either “a fair amount” (30%) or “a great deal” (22%), based on findings of a recent Gallup poll of 809 adults nationwide.

At least two-thirds of respondents also believe that the presidency has a major effect on their fundamental attitudes about the nation as a whole and; on a personal level, their standard of living.

On only one aspect—their relationships with other people—do a majority (57%) say that they are affected only a little (24%) or not at all (33%).

More than four in 10 apply the strongest descriptor—a great deal—in describing the effect that the president has on their optimism about the nation’s future (45%). In fact, 40% say their confidence in the U.S. economy is affected a great deal, and 37% say the presidency greatly affects their satisfaction with the way things are going in the country.

On aspects of their personal lives, 35% say their confidence in maintaining or improving their standard of living is affected a great deal.

The presidency also has a relatively strong effect on Americans’ engagement with public affairs. Forty-five percent say the person serving as president affects their interest in current events a great deal; while 23% say a fair amount; 21%, only a little;and 10%, not at all.

There are few significant differences among major demographic groups — gender, education, political party affiliation — regarding people’s self-reports of the presidency’s effects. But there are differences by income and by attitudes about Trump in particular.
Looking at our current president, although Americans on both sides of the political aisle may have strong opinions of Trump, those who approve of the job he is doing are more likely than those who disapprove to say that the presidency affects them.
The largest gap between the two groups is related to confidence in the economy: 54% of those who approve versus 33% of those who disapprove say the presidency greatly affects that aspect of their lives.
Research contactdatainquiry@gallup.com