Posts tagged with "Gallup Poll"

Gallup: 66% of Americans still are ‘worried’ about COVID-19 exposure; 29% are ‘very worried’

June 18, 2020

While about one-third of Americans believe, if you can’t see it, you can’t catch it; the rest of us still are relying on face masks and hand sanitizer. In fact, about two-thirds of Americans continue to say they “are  worried” about being exposed to the coronavirus, as multiple states see a new spike in cases, according to a Gallup poll released Wednesday reveals, according to a report by The Hill.

Gallup found that 29% of respondents are “very worried” about exposure to the coronavirus, and 66% are either “somewhat” or “very” worried.

The proportion who are concerned about the coronavirus has risen since Gallup began asking the question in February, The Hill notes. That month, 36% of Americans said they were either somewhat or very worried about exposure—a figure that more than doubled in March; and has plateaued at somewhere between 63% and 67% since then.

Specifically, 37% of black respondents and 50% of Hispanics said they were “very” worried, compared to only 25% of white respondents. A number of studies have indicated that COVID-19 is impacting people of color at disproportionate rates across the country. 

And The Hill says, there are also partisan divides over how concerned Americans are, with 85% of Democrats saying they are at least somewhat worried that they or their family will come into contact with the virus, compared with 47% of Republicans and 66% of Independents.

There have been over 2.1 million confirmed coronavirus cases nationwide, and nearly 117,000 people have died.

The poll comes as several states across the country are seeing new spikes in coronavirus cases, throwing reopening plans into question. California, Texas, Arizona and Florida are among the states reporting the highest daily increases in case counts. In Texas, health authorities on Tuesday registered the state’s highest number of hospitalizations due to COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus.

The Trump Administration has sought to blame the rise in cases on the increasing number of tests, but experts say there has also been a rise in the percentage of tests that are coming back positive.

The Gallup poll surveyed 1,034 adults from May 28 to June 4.

Research contact: @thehill

Levi Strauss CEO takes a stand on gun violence

September 12, 2018

Support for tougher gun laws hit a 25-year high last March in the United States, in the wake of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. A Gallup poll fielded that month found that 67% of Americans  supported tougher restrictions on guns.

At that time, several businesses, including Dick’s Sporting Goods and Walmart, responded to the death of 17 students—and the nationwide fear of gun violence—by limiting their sales of semiautomatic rifles like the AR-15, as well as the bullets that go with them.

But those companies with no ties to the National Rifle Association (NRA) or gun sales hesitated to take a stand, for fear of alienating their customers. Except, that is, for Levi Strauss & Co., which in November 2016 requested in an open letters from its CEO that gun owners not bring firearms into its stores, offices, or facilities—even in states where it is permitted by law.

In a September 4 commentary piece published by Fortune magazine, Levi Strauss President and CEO Chip Bergh recalls the backlash after that letter became public—and challenges other like-minded businesses to do the same.

“In the days after I published that letter,” Bergh says, “I received threats to our stores, our business, and even on my life. It was unsettling. But these personal attacks pale in comparison to the threats that activists and survivors from Parkland, Sandy Hook, and daily incidents of gun violence face every time they speak up on this issue.”

However, he says to other business leaders in the opinion piece, “We simply cannot  stand by silently when it comes to the issues that threaten the very fabric of the communities where we live and work. While taking a stand can be unpopular with some, doing nothing is no longer an option….Americans shouldn’t have to live in fear of gun violence. It’s an issue that affects all of us—all generations and walks of life.”

As of September 4, Bergh said, “on top of our previous actions, Levi Strauss & Co. is lending its support for gun violence prevention in three new areas.”

  • First, says Bergh, the company has established the Safer Tomorrow Fund, which will direct more than $1 million in philanthropic grants from Levi Strauss & Co. over the next four years to fuel the work of nonprofits and youth activists who are working to end gun violence in America.
  • Second, Levi Strauss will partner with Everytown for Gun Safety and executives including Michael Bloomberg to form Everytown Business Leaders for Gun Safety—“a coalition of business leaders who believe, as we do, that business has a critical role to play in and a moral obligation to do something about the gun violence epidemic in this country.”
  • Third, he says, “We know that some of our employees have been personally affected by this issue and want to see change.” Therefore, the company is doubling its usual employee donation match to organized aligned with its Safer Tomorrow Fund. In addition, Levi Strauss is encouraging its staff who are concerned to get involved. The company provides employees with five hours a month (60 hours a year) in paid volunteer time—and recently expanded this to include political activism.

“As a company,” Bergh says, “we have never been afraid to take an unpopular stand to support a greater good. We integrated our factories in the American South years before the Civil Rights Act was passed. We offered benefits to same-sex partners in the 1990s, long before most companies did. We pulled our financial support for the Boy Scouts of America when it banned gay troop leaders.

“While each one of these stands may have been controversial at the time, history proved the company right in the long run. And I’m convinced that while some will disagree with our stand to end gun violence, history will prove this position right too.”

The NRA commented immediately after the opinion piece ran, saying” In a repulsive insult to the nation’s 100 million gun owners, Bergh likened Levi’s campaign to restrict the rights of law-abiding Americans to previous company efforts aimed at combating pre-Civil Rights Era racial bigotry. Among gun owners, Levi’s has used its name and resources to attack gun rights.

“Given the majority of Levi’s 165-year history, Bergh’s decision to use a formerly quintessential American company to attack a quintessential American right is a particularly sad episode in the current surge in corporate virtue-signaling. We can only assume that Levi’s accountants have determined that resulting skinny jeans sales will be enough to offset the permanent damage to their once-cherished brand.”

Research contact: datainquiry@gallup.com

Trump Calls Omarosa Manigault Newman ‘That Dog’

August 15, 2018

On Tuesday, August 14—the morning that former White House Assistant to the President Omarosa Manigault Newman’s book, Unhinged: An Insider’s Account of the Trump Administration went on sale—the POTUS tweeted his thoughts at 7:31 a.m. “When you  give a crazed, crying lowlife a break, and give her a job at the White House, I guess it just didn’t work out. Good work by General Kelly for quickly firing that dog!”

In response, Manigault Newman told Katy Tur of MSNBC that, if her former boss called her a “dog” in public, she wondered what he called her privately.

During that same interview, Manigault Newman said that she had told Special Counsel Robert Mueller, who is conducting the investigation on Russia’s involvement in the 2016 election, that “there was a lot of corruption” in the campaign and the administration. She added that Trump had known about the “hacked emails” before they were released.

And the plot continues to thicken, as Trump and Newman expertly lob insults—and damning new information—at each other.

Trump has deployed the “dog” insult previously, The New York Times reported. In one case , the news outlet said, Trump claimed that his onetime political rival Senator Ted Cruz (R-Texas) “lies like a dog” and, in another, he called Arianna Huffington, co-founder of HuffPost, a “dog.”

On Monday, NBC released a tape Manigault Newman made of her speaking to Trump, which she said was recorded the day after she was fired. In the recording, the president said he knew nothing about this personnel decision and told her, “I don’t love you leaving at all.”

Last December 12, White House Chief of Staff, John F. Kelly, fired her in the Situation Room, the most secure conference room in the White House. Manigault Newman has released a recording of that conversation, as well.

Kelly said, according to her new book, “I’d like to see this be a friendly departure. There are pretty significant legal issues that we hope won’t make it ugly for you.” However, he declined to hash over the rationale for letting her go, saying “This is a nonnegotiable discussion.”

Manigault Newman has said she has more audio recordings, and in an interview Monday on MSNBC’s “Hardball,” she said she would continue to cooperate with the special counsel, if asked. “Anything they want, I’ll share,” she said.

Just the day before, on August 13, a Trump tweet confirmed, after months of confabulation on the issue, that Manigault Newman had been forced to sign a non-disclosure agreement. Such agreements are illegal, unless they are confined to information that is top secret and highly secure.

The POTUS’s job approval rating registered at 39% on August 12, according to the Gallup poll.

 Research contact: datainquiry@gallup.com

Pot luck? Wrigley heir hopes so!

August 7, 2018

William Wrigley Jr. II, who walked away from the 2008 sale of his family’s gum and candy business with an estimated net worth of $2.5 billion, led a $65 million Series C equity fundraising round in July for Surterra Wellness—a medical cannabis startup in Georgia with licenses to operate in Florida and Texas. The round brings the total raised so far to $100 million, Surterra says.

Wrigley, 54, who left the gum and candy business after the sale to Mars a decade ago, backs companies through a personal investment arm based in West Palm Beach, Florida, according to Bloomberg. After an initial investment in Surterra last September, Wrigley (who is known as Beau) is boosting his stake and assuming the role of chairman. Surterra is his first direct investment in the marijuana industry.

Speaking for the first time publicly about his investment, Wrigley said, “I am thrilled to join the Surterra team and help drive their mission to build a best-in-class cannabis healthcare business. After extensive diligence, we determined that Surterra has the highest quality standards, best products, and professional management team in the industry. We believe in the ability of cannabis to improve quality of life for patients across the country, and we are excited to build a global industry leader for the long term.”

Founded in 2014, Surterra Wellness claims to be “one of the fastest growing and leading medical cannabis companies in the United States.” W.The company offers a variety of products in multiple delivery options—including vaporizer pens, tinctures, oral sprays, topical creams, time-released transdermal patches, and soon-to-be be-launched softgels.

Wrigley, says he got into the industry mainly because of marijuana’s medical benefits, Bloomberg reports. He said he’s tapping his experience with product distribution and brand-building to drive growth at Surterra. “When I understood the massive benefits, it really changed my mind about the industry,” Wrigley said in an interview with the business news outlet. “You don’t see too many opportunities to have that kind of impact in an industry that is being created from scratch.”

Wrigley said Surterra plans to eventually participate in the domestic recreational marijuana market, which is forecast to surge above $5 billion this year. Indeed, the Gallup poll says that the percentage of those who have tried marijuana (45%) is at its highest since 1969. One in eight Americans current smokes pot, the pollsters say. Despite some hesitation because of the federal ban, the transition of billions of dollars into the legal U.S. economy from the black market is drawing a lot interest from investors.

“Everyone seems to be in there because they think they’re going to make tons of money,” Wrigley said. “Some will and some will be sorely surprised when they understand how complex it is.”

Research contact: datainquiry@gallup.com

Are fraternity and sorority members ‘set for life’?

July 26, 2018

A Gallup survey has found that, of more than 30,000 college graduates nationwide, those who were members of fraternities or sororities are more likely to be “thriving” personally and professionally. Overall, Gallup found, they are more engaged at work than college graduates who did not go Greek.

But the unanswered question in this poll remains, were these students picked by fraternities and sororities because they already were attractive, and socially and academically sophisticated, compared to their peers? Were they on track for success to begin with, and thus, more likely to be recruited both by Greek organizations and future employers? The poll did not go there.

Gallup partnered with the National Panhellenic Conference and the North-American Interfraternity Conference to conduct this research. It is a subset of the initial Gallup-Purdue Index survey released in April 2014, which studied the characteristics of the student experience that are most important to long-term outcomes for graduates. The report found that college graduates who had inspiring mentors and professors, who took part in long-term academic projects and extracurricular activities, and who had an internship or job where they applied what they learned are more likely to have higher well-being and work engagement later in life.

The 16% of college graduates who were members of Greek organizations are more likely to report being emotionally supported and having experiential and deep learning activities while in college, all of which likely have contributed to their higher work engagement and well-being.

Fraternity and sorority members’ engagement advantage indicates that they are more likely to be intellectually and emotionally connected to their organizations and enthusiastic about their work. Overall, 43% of fraternity and sorority members who are employed full-time for an employer are engaged in the workplace, compared with 38% of all other college graduates. Importantly, these differences are statistically significant after controlling for key demographic variables, including gender, race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status.

Additionally, fraternity and sorority members are more likely than all other college graduates to be thriving in each of the five elements of well-being: purpose, physical, social, financial, and community. Thus, fraternity and sorority members are more likely than their non-Greek counterparts to find fulfillment in daily work and interactions, to have strong social relationships and access to the resources people need, to feel financially secure, to be physically healthy, and to take part in a true community.

These fraternity and sorority members like what they do every day and get to learn or do something interesting on a daily basis, which is why the majority (59%) are thriving in this element of well-being. More fraternity and sorority members are thriving in the element of social well-being than all other college graduates. More than half (54%) of fraternity and sorority members have strong relationships with friends and family that lead them to be thriving in the area of social well-being, compared to less than half of all other college graduates (48%).

Similarly, fraternity and sorority members are more likely to be thriving in the element of financial well-being than all other college graduates (46% vs. 42%). Fraternity and sorority members are also more likely to be thriving in community well-being than all other college graduates (52% vs. 46%). Exposure to volunteer opportunities via the Greek network may contribute to the differences identified in community well-being for fraternity and sorority members and all other college graduates.

Although fraternity and sorority members are more likely to be thriving in the element of physical well-being than all other college graduates (37% vs. 34%), fewer fraternity and sorority members are thriving in physical well-being than in any other element.

Additionally, fewer fraternity and sorority members are thriving in none of the elements than are their non-fraternity and non-sorority peers (13% vs. 18%). Differences in well-being between fraternity and sorority members and all other college graduates are statistically significant when controlling for key demographic characteristics including gender, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status as measured by first generation education status

Research contact: datainquiry@gallup.com

64% of Americans support Roe v. Wade

July 13, 2018

As the U.S. Senate prepares to hold confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, the public is strongly opposed to any attempts to overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark 1973 ruling that made abortion legal nationwide. Currently, 64% of Americans believe the decision should stand, while 28% would like to see it overturned, based on findings of a poll released by Gallup on July 12.

The poll was conducted July 2-8, just before President Donald Trump announced Kavanaugh as his nominee to replace retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy. Many Democratic senators quickly voiced their opposition to the conservative 53-year-old judge—whom, they say is pro-life and against indicting a sitting president. While nominees to the high court often do not openly share their personal views on issues, their past public statements are scrutinized.

Partisans’ opinions are sharply polarized, with 81% of Democrats, 70% of Independents and 41% of Republicans saying they do not want Roe v. Wade overturned. In contrast, 51% of Republicans, 22% of Independents and 13% of Democrats want it reversed.

While Democrats’ opinions have been consistent over time, Republicans’ views have been less so. For example, a majority of Republicans—albeit a slim majority, at 52%—said in 2006 that the case should not be overturned.

However, one Republican is holding firm, according to a report by CNN. Vice President Mike Pence  told the news outlet on July that he still wants to see the judgment overturned—but wouldn’t say whether Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh would be the guy to make it happen.

When asked in an interview with CNN’s Dana Bash about wanting to outlaw abortion, Pence responded, “Well, I do.

“But,” he continued, “I haven’t been nominated to the Supreme Court.”

Pence denied that either he or President Donald Trump had asked Kavanaugh about his views on abortion. “What the American people ought to know is, as the president said today, this is not an issue that he discussed with Judge Kavanaugh, I didn’t discuss it with him either.”

Research contact: datainquiry@gallup.com

McCain does not want Trump at funeral

May 9, 2018

In recognition of the continuing ill will between Senator John McCain (R-Arizona) and President Donald Trump, the ailing legislator and war hero—age 81 and battling aggressive brain cancer—has let it be known to the White House that he does not want the POTUS to attend his funeral. Vice President Mike Pence has been invited in Trump’s place.

The beef between the two men began during Trump’s presidential campaign, when the candidate said of the former Navy pilot, who had been held as a prisoner of war by the North Vietnamese at the Hanoi Hilton, “I like people who weren’t captured.”

But the relationship became truly icy last summer, after the Senator cast a pivotal vote that defeated GOP attempts to repeal the Affordable Care Act at 2 a.m. on Friday, July 27.

Following that vote, McCain’s  favorability rating rose to 58% among the American public, according to Gallup—with a surge in Democratic favorability more than making up for a decline among McCain’s fellow Republicans.

At the same time, President Donald Trump had a rating of 36%, after he made remarks questioning McCain’s military service at the Family Leadership  Summit on July 15.

He’s a war hero because he was captured,” Trump told moderator Frank Luntz—a remark that was followed by some boos from the nearly 2,000 attendees of the event on the campus of Iowa State University, ABC News reported.

McCain spent five and a half years as a P.O.W.; deferments enabled Trump to dodge service in Vietnam entirely.

Trump also did not attend the recent funeral of former first lady Barbara Bush in Houston, Texas—supposedly  in order “to avoid disruptions due to added security, and out of respect for the Bush Family and friends attending the service,” the White House said last month. First lady Melania Trump attended the service instead, along with former Presidents George H.W. Bush, George W. Bush, Bill Clinton and former first lady Hillary Clinton.

Now, NBC News reports, Former Presidents Barack Obama and George W. Bush have been requested by McCain to be eulogists at his funeral service, which is to be held at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C..

Research contact: @RebeccaShabad

‘Not Off Our Coast’ is new slogan vs. offshore drilling

January 15, 2018

“Not Off Our Coast,” North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper (D) tweeted on January 11, in response to a new policy announced by the Trump administration that would expand offshore oil drilling on both the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of the United States.

The governor is among a handful of state leaders who are protesting both the new policy and the exemption of largely Republican Florida from that ruling—which has greatly angered the other states affected

Specifically, ARS Technica reported, the governors of New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, California, Oregon, and Washington all oppose the practice. And Democratic senators from Florida and Massachusetts, California Attorney General Xavier Becerra, and Republican South Carolina Representative Mark Sanford also have come out in opposition to new leases being auctioned off outside of their constituencies.

Cooper said, “We’ve been clear: This would bring unacceptable risks to our economy, our environment and our coastal communities.”

According to a report by The Washington Post, the Florida carve-out, announced January 9 by Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, created new doubts about the fate of the entire offshore drilling decision — and immediately became another challenge for Republicans as they work to hold off Democrats in the midterm elections.

Nine of the 11 states that opposed the drilling order, the Post said, have gubernatorial races this year, and many of the most competitive contests for the House of Representatives will unfold in districts that touch coastline.

Most Americans oppose the change in policy, as well. Indeed, 59% of U.S. adults said they prioritized protecting the environment in Gallup’s March 2017 Environment survey, compared with 34% who supported the production of oil, natural gas and coal. This was the highest percentage who favored protecting the environment over energy production since 2001.

While not directly related to offshore drilling, less than half of Americans expressed support for opening up additional federal land for oil exploration in that same poll. This was down from 65% in 2014 when Gallup first asked the question.

Research contact:datainquiry@gallup.com

54% of Americans want bipartisan cooperation in Congress

January 12, 2018

At a planning retreat at Camp David attended by Congressional leaders, White House aides and the POTUS last weekend, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell made a plea for teamwork and harmony, stating, “We hope that 2018 [will] be a year of more bipartisan cooperation,” and predicting that a “significant number of Democrats” would be interested in supporting Trump’s agenda.

This burst of bipartisan sentiment certainly fits with the wishes of the American people, based on findings of a recent Gallup poll of 1,052 U.S. adults.

Indeed, 54% of Americans want political leaders in Washington to compromise to get things done, according to respondents nationwide.

The polling organization commented, “This far outpaces the 18% [of respondents] who would prefer that leaders stick to their beliefs even if little gets done, while the views of 28% fall somewhere in between. The gap between compromise and sticking to principles is the widest in Gallup’s trend [reporting to date].”

Those who want the parties to stick to their own guns are led by Republican conservatives, the polling organization said.

If bipartisan cooperation occurs— spurred on partly by the looming government shutdown deadline on January 19— it could begin to ameliorate, at least to a degree, the public’s sense that government itself is the top problem facing the nation today.

In addition, of course, it could help improve the low job approval ratings Americans give Congress (and Trump) and the negative top-of-mind reactions Americans have when they hear the words “federal government.”

Research contactdatainquiry@gallup.com

Barack Obama edges out Donald Trump as most admired man

January 2, 2018

Americans once again have named Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton as the man and woman they admire most in the world, as they have for the past 10 years.

The pair retain their titles this year, although by much narrower margins than in the past. Obama edged out Donald Trump, 17% to 14%, while Clinton edged out Michelle Obama, 9% to 7%.

Those who placed slightly lower were not exactly “chopped liver”,” either: Rounding out the top five for men were Pope Francis, Reverend Billy Graham and Elon Musk.

The top five for women also included  Oprah Winfrey, Senator Elizabeth Warren and Chancellor of Germany Angela Merkel.

The 2017 Gallup Poll, conducted early in December, marks the 16th consecutive year in which Clinton has been named the most-admired woman. She has held the title 22 times in total—more than anyone else.

Eleanor Roosevelt is second, with 13 wins. Obama has now been named the most admired man ten times; trailing only Dwight Eisenhower, who earned the distinction 12 times. Obama won all eight years he was president, plus 2008—the year he was first elected-—and this year, his first as a former president.

One-quarter of Americans cannot name a man or a woman whom they admire most. Nine percent named a relative or friend as the most admired man, and 13% did the same for the most admired woman.

As would be expected for a Republican president, Trump won handily among Republicans: 35% named him as the man they admired most, with only 1% naming Obama

Research contact:  datainquiry@gallup.com