Posts tagged with "Footwear"

MLB uniforms and footwear will feature the Nike Swoosh starting in 2020

January 28, 2019

Major League Baseball, Nike and Fanatics have announced a new ten-year global partnership that makes Nike the official uniform and footwear supplier of MLB starting in the 2020 season.

The new cooperation among the three organizations will provide Major League Baseball players with on-field uniforms developed by Nike’s team of designers and will provide fans with the widest assortment of MLB fan gear ever, manufactured and distributed by Fanatics.

Starting in 2020, on-field uniforms will feature the Nike Swoosh, along with base-layer, game-day outerwear and all training apparel for the 30 MLB clubs.

Fanatics has been granted broad consumer product licensing rights to manage the manufacturing and distribution of the Nike MLB Authentic Collection, as well as Nike and Fanatics fan gear, sold through the retail community, including MLBShop.com, MLB clubs and brick & mortar stores.

Enhancing both assortment and speed-to-market of MLB products, Fanatics will use its vertical commerce model to create and distribute a wide range of MLB fan apparel sold at retail, including jerseys, Postseason apparel, and hot market gear that captures the latest events happening on the field.

“Nike’s global brand and reputation as a leader in marketing and driving innovation makes them an ideal partner,” said Baseball Commissioner Robert D. Manfred, Jr. “In addition, Fanatics is a valuable partner [that] has proven to serve our fans with speed, agility and quality service. We’re very excited about the possibilities this unique arrangement provides us over the next decade.”

In addition, Nike will continue as an official MLB sponsor, supporting league initiatives, grassroots marketing and fan events. Nike, as part of the new agreement, will partner with all 30 MLB Clubs and promote its brand and products across MLB media assets including MLB Network, MLB.com, and MLB Social.

Nike currently has endorsement relationships with over 500 MLB and Minor League players including Mike Trout, Giancarlo Stanton, George Springer, José Ramirez, Max Scherzer, Jacob deGrom, Javier Báez and Nolan Arenado to name a few.

“We’re thrilled to bring more innovation and creativity to Major League Baseball and the incredible athletes who play the game,” said Tom Peddie, VP/GM of Nike North America. “This is an exciting time for baseball, and we look forward to partnering with MLB to grow the sport both across America as well as around the globe”

“Given the continued rise in real-time demand by both fans and retailers, this three-way partnership will ensure MLB fans always have access to the products they crave regardless how, where or when they want to shop,” said Fanatics Founder and Executive Chairman Michael Rubin. “This progressive approach around joining forces between an elite performance brand and the innovative vertical capabilities of Fanatics continues to be the future model for licensed sports merchandise.”

Research contact: @MLB

Allbirds perches in New York City and plans more stores nationwide

September 5, 2018

The newest product to come out of Silicon Valley needs no tech support—but it’s supporting the feet of such well-known techies as Google Co-founder Larry Page, former Twitter chief Dick Costolo, and venture capitalists Ben Horowitz and Mary Meeker, according to a September 4 report by CNBC.

Called Allbirds, the new brand of footwear—produced with such sustainable resources as merino wool, tree fibers, and sugar— already has won over customers on the West Coast and is expanding fast. The company opened its first store on the East Coast, in New York City, just after Labor Day.

At more than 4,800 square feet, the new flagship location in New York’s SoHo neighborhood on Spring Street will include a “service bar” to help buyers find the right size, along with room for customers to lounge. It will replace its temporary home on Prince Street, which was about 900 square feet and is closing later this week.

Like the wildly popular Warby Parker (eyeglasses), Casper (mattresses), and  Everlane (clothing), Allbirds began business as an etailer.

The company only recently began opening stores, serving as a place for shoppers to try on the sneakers before buying and helping create more buzz around the brand. The company has since launched a new sneaker made out of tree fibers and flip-flops made out of sugar, along with a kids’ line called Smallbirds.

Indeed, the brand has become so buzzworthy that, last month, actor and environmentalist Leonardo DiCaprio became an investor, People magazine reported.

Creating sustainable consumer products requires a deep commitment from brands that understand the role they have in helping solve our environmental crisis,” DiCaprio said in an exclusive statement. “Allbirds is on the forefront of developing new materials that will serve as a model for the footwear industry. This kind of innovation is crucial for creating a more sustainable future. I am proud to join the company as an investor.”

“Given how tactile our product and brand story is, it’s important that we continue to create these opportunities to interact with customers,” Allbirds Co-founder Joey Zwillinger said. “Our goal is to continue to create retail spaces that allow customers to truly engage with the brand in an authentic off-line experience that embodies Allbirds’ unique comfort and thoughtful design.”

Allbirds plans to open eight more stores in the United States in locations including Chicago, Boston, Los Angeles,  and Washington, D.C. The company also said it’s thinking about adding two locations overseas.

“There is and has been incredible pent-up demand for Allbirds around the world,” Zwillinger told CNBC. “When we launched the brand, we were thoughtful to keep our distribution limited to the regions we felt we could service impeccably — the United States  and New Zealand, our home countries.”

Since then, Allbirds has grown into Australia and Canada.

Research contact: lauren.thomas@nbcuni.com

Hearth and sole: Should you ask guests to remove their shoes?

January 22, 2018

It is the custom in many nations—Japan, Germany, Switzerland—to remove one’s shoes before entering your own home or any other person’s residence. However, while most Americans (74%%) remove their footwear, either always, most of the time, or sometimes when they arrive home, poll results released by YouGov on January 17 find that they don’t necessarily expect visitors to do so.

In fact, 50% of the 6,422 U.S. adults polled in early January said they never ask visitors to take off their shoes at the front door.

Specifically, the latest results show that nearly one-third of Americans (31%) will “always” take off their shoes at home and others follow suit “most of the time” (26%), ”sometimes” (18%), or “rarely” (12%).

Geographically, 92% of people living in the Midwest say that they take off their shoes, compared to the Northeast (88%), West (86%), and South (83%).

Sorting the data by age reveals that older Millennials (ages 25-34) and those ages 35-44 report highest rates of shoe removal—at 90% and 89% respectively. The latter group also leads the nation in saying they always remove their shoes at home (40% compared to 31%).

Conversely, only 10% will “always” request their guests remove their shoes—although slightly more say they ask less frequently: either “most of the time” (11%), “sometimes” (13%), or “rarely” (13%).

Slightly more men (52%) than women (49%) say they ask visitors to take off their shoes sometimes. People living in the South are the most likely to say they never ask visitors take off their shoes (58%). Those in the Midwest (61%) and Northeast (57%) are the most likely of the four regions to say they would at least sometimes ask guests to remove their shoes.

The poll also suggests that requesting guests to take off their shoes may be a generational matter. Those 55 and older (64%) are 14 percentage points more likely than the general public (50%) to say they would never ask their guests do so.

Research contact: Hoang.Nguyen@YouGov.com