Posts tagged with "Fitness"

Former Nike exec launches new, ‘distributed weight’ sportswear brand Omorpho

November 12, 2021

Former Nike executive Stefan Olander is looking to bring in a new era of sportswear with premium sports and fitness start-up Omorpho, featuring products designed to strategically distribute weight across the body to improve fitness, speed, and power, reports Mumbai, India-based Fashion United.

Founded in 2017, the Portland, Oregon-based company has been developing its Gravity Sportswear collection for more than three years—seeking to challenge the misconception that lightweight apparel is better for all sports and training.

The Gravity Sportswear collection uses MicroLoad to amplify the effect of any workout by strategically distributing small amounts of weight across the body and constructed with premium performance fabrics to provide comfort and elasticity for maximum range of motion during any type of training.

The visible weighted gravity spheres that make up MicroLoad are strategically placed anatomically for functionality and intentionally to deliver an aesthetic that boosts confidence to give the wearer more from every workout, adds the brand.

Olander said in a statement: “We’ve always been told that what we wear for sports and fitness should be as lightweight as possible, but the first thing we do to get stronger and fitter is add resistance. So why not build it into what we wear?

“Sports apparel today is optimized for competition, but most people compete less than 1 percent of the time. We’ve created a beautiful and functional collection for the other 99%, using a completely new approach to deliver better results by adding small amounts of weight that don’t restrict movement.”

Olander, a former vice president of innovation at Nike, founded Omorpho alongside TBWA’s incoming chief creative experience officer, Ben Williams, and developed and brought the new sportswear brand to market with a group of former senior Nike executives.

The company recently completed an “oversubscribed” US$5 million seed round, led by Chicago based sports/tech venture capital firm KB Partners with participation from Bullish, Viking Macabee, ex-Nike executives, and several family offices.

Omorpho, named after the Greek word meaning beautiful, have also tapped a line-up of ambassadors featuring athletes, artists and celebrities chosen to demonstrate the broad application of Gravity Sportswear from sport to dance to general fitness.

The Omorpho ambassadors include NFL player Julio Jones, Grammy, Emmy and ;Tony award-winning actress, singer and producer Cynthia Erivo; and BMX Bike athlete, actor and model Matthias Dandois.

Omorpho’s Gravity Sportswear collection is available for men and women; and includes long- and short-sleeve tops, vests, biker shorts, and leggings, available exclusively at Omorpho.fit. Prices start from $US100

Research contact: @FashionUnitedIN

Hydrow welcomes new celebrity investors Kevin Hart, Lizzo, Aaron Rodgers, Justin Timberlake

September 22, 2021

Hydrow, a leading at-home connected rower that brings the on-water experience of rowing straight to the customer’s home, has announced investments from celebrities including Lizzo, Aaron Rodgers, Justin Timberlake, Whitney Cummings, Travis Kelce, and Kevin Hart, as well as retail partner Fabletics.

An early adopter turned investor, Hart was named creative director last October and has since been providing innovative ideas across the Boston-based business, including working out alongside Hydrow’s athletes and community, the company says in a news release.

“I invested in Hydrow because, pound for pound, there’s no better workout out there than rowing,” said Hart, adding, “I signed on as creative director because I truly believe in this machine’s potential to change people’s lives. You’re getting so much more than a workout each time you strap in. You’re shifting your mindset, and that’s a powerful thing.”

With almost $200 million in cumulative funding secured, this latest round of celebrity backing cements Hydrow’s position as a leader in the rapidly growing wellness space and will embolden the company to continue to redefine at-home fitness.

The capital will help fuel additional innovation and global expansion to make the sport of rowing more accessible to everyone. The announcement is underscored by the continued momentum the company gained last year, with sales skyrocketing 500%.

“It is an honor to have some of the most well-regarded names in music, sports and entertainment support our crew as we strive to enhance our members’ lives through the shared experience of rowing,” said Bruce Smith, founder & CEO of Hydrow.

“As we continue to focus on positioning rowing as an accessible and mainstream lifestyle choice, we are excited to join forces with these exceptional people who each offer unique experiences and insights to help us in achieving this goal.”

The company’s highly immersive full-body workouts engage 86% of the body’s major muscle groups, twice that of cycling or running, Hydrow claims, Currently the company offers nearly 3,000 live and on-demand workout, led by world-class athletes, Olympians and Paralympians, which transport users to waterways around the world, with locales including London, Lucerne, Miami, Boston and more.

Research contact: @Hydrow

How he does it: Tom Brady’s extreme diet and fitness routines

February 9, 2021

On February 7, Tom Brady broke his own record as the oldest QB ever—at age 43—to win a Super Bowl; when his Tampa Bay Buccaneers took on the reigning champs, the Kansas City Chiefs, on the Bucs’ home turf, defeating them 31-9.

According to NBC News, “The game was supposed to be an epic battle of the ages, pitting the all-time great Brady against Patrick Mahomes, 25, widely regarded as the best young quarterback in the game.”

But it obviously didn’t work out that way, as the Buccaneers took a decisive lead in the first half and never lost it.

Suffice it to say, The New York Post reports, “Brady is one of a kind, a phenomenon who shows no sign of slowing down any time soon in a sport where longevity is rare.”

But how does Brady do it? The Post notes that he follows a stringent diet, exercise, and study routine—not only to keep in shape, but to exceed expectations on every level.

Put simply, Brady is an obsessive—a man with a plan and the determination (and money) to execute it, as John Burns, CEO of Brady’s TB12 health and wellness organization, explains.

“Tom’s sustained success over the past 20-plus years is a testament to his incredible drive and his meticulous approach to everything he does.” Burns says. “It’s that mindset that allows him to keep going.”

Here’s how he does it, according to the Post:

Daily schedule

  • 5:30 a.m.:  Wake up, drink electrolyte water and smoothie
  • 7 a.m.: Breakfast with family
  • 8 – 10:30 a.m.: Hit the gym for strengthening and conditioning
  • 10 a.m:  Beach time
  • 11 a.m.:  Review game footage
  • Noon: Lunch
  • 3 -5  p.m.: Team practice or, in the off-season, surf and workout
  • 5-6 p.m.: Post-workout pliability session
  • 6 p.m:  Dinner with family
  • 7 p.m.: Review films, strategy w/ Coach, charity work
  • 7:30 p.m.: Family time, including reading to kids
  • 8:30 p.m.: Lights out and sleep

Fitness

It’s been said that trainer Alex Guerrero knows Tom Brady’s body better than the QB’s wife, Gisele Bündchen. As well as being his business partner in the TB12 health-and-wellness brand—including a chain of fitness centers that they plan to expand nationwide—Guerrero has  been described by Brady as his “body engineer,” the Post says.

He’s micromanaged the athlete’s training schedule month—and even year—in advance. An average day will begin early with a pre-workout “deep force” massage session with Guerrero. It only lasts four minutes, but targets 20 muscle groups for around 20 seconds each. It helps prepare Brady’s body for an intense workout, beginning with 40 minutes of resistance bands, to make muscles more pliable, soft, and resilient.

As the quarterback has aged, he works out less with weights, which could leave him prone to muscle tears. Now it’s all about planks, lunges and squats, followed by more pliability exercises, such as doing crunches with a vibrating roller beneath his back.

After, there’s another massage, this time with the focus of flushing out the lactic acid that builds up during exercise, to help improve muscle recovery time.

During the NFL season, he’ll work out with teammates in the afternoon. Off season, he might get in some surfing. There’s also another pliability session, to improve muscle recovery time, before bed.

Diet

First thing every morning, Brady has a smoothie. His favorite is made with blueberries and banana, hemp and chia seeds, walnuts, almond butter and hemp milk. He’ll also start drinking electrolyte water.

While there’s no denying that Brady’s spartan diet has played a major part in prolonging his playing career, some of his former New England Patriots teammates thought it obsessive and unappetizing — or as one put it, “that birdseed s–t.”

Caffeine is off the table. So is white flour, white sugar, dairy products and anything with gluten. He steers clear of veggies—tomatoes, eggplants, peppers, mushrooms —that could cause inflammation. Everything has to be organic. Brady each day tries to drink “a couple of hundred ounces” of water, usually enhanced with electrolytes. (He sells those, along with various nutritional supplements, through his TB12 site.)

Allen Campbell was Brady’s personal chef from 2013 to 2016; and helped him to create the TB12 Nutrition Manual, published in 2017. He told the Post that, at this time of year, “We focused on dark leafy greens, some grass-fed animal protein as well as legumes and whole grains.”

But that’s not what Brady will eat before the Super Bowl. His game-day meals are even more basic: a smoothie and a sandwich of almond butter and jelly.

It’s all a far cry from his rookie season in 2000; Brady admitted that his pregame snack used to be nachos while his default lunch was ham-and-cheese subs with onion rings and a large orange soda.

Brady sticks to an 80/20 (plant-based/animal protein) diet. Even his favorite ice cream is plant-based; made from avocado with a little cacao mixed in, so it tastes like chocolate.

Mind

Besides having worked with a life coach in the past,   Brady practices transcendental meditation, striving to become what Guerrero has described as “emotionally stable and ­spiritually nourished.”

He’s also had neuroscans so he can better understand the way his brain processes information and create strategies to improve that.

Brady exercises his brain using apps such as BrainHQ. Although the app was designed to help those with brain conditions such as cognitive damage or memory loss, Brady has used it to sharpen his reactions—working his way through two dozen brain games or more each day.

“Tom explained it like this,” said Henry Mahncke, CEO of the app’s creators, Posit Science. “When he gets the [ball], he remembers the play, then he has to scan the field, locate the receivers, figure out which ones are on their routes and which are open, and make the pass. All in about three seconds.”

Sleep

Finally, the Post reports, Brady loves sleeping. Before his first Super Bowl in 2002, he even took a nap in the locker room only to be woken up with just 12 minutes left before the Patriots were due on the field.

These days, he hits the hay at 8:30  each night and wakes at 5:30 a.m. But everything has to be right. From sleeping on a mattress with a layer of diamond memory foam to setting the bedroom thermostat to between 60 degrees and 65 degrees and shutting down all digital distractions at least 30 minutes before he retires, Brady is as obsessive about sleep as he is about, well, everything else in his life.

And then there’s his magic pajamas: bioceramic-infused sleepwear made by Under Armour to increase energy, promote recovery and improve performance. And you can, too, can sleep like Tom, although a complete set will set you back nearly $200.

Research contact: @newyorkpost

Move over, Americans: Europeans are way fitter!

July 9 ,2018

Most of us do not have the lithe, athletic “body beautiful” that we see on the covers of fitness magazines; but our anatomy gets us where we’re going every day, without too much huffing and puffing—so we assume we are in “good enough” shape.

Some of us even manage to go the gym for an hour or two a week, or to jog around the high school track. We assume that counts as physical fitness.

But we are wrong, according to the findings of an international study conducted in England, the Netherlands, and the United States, and published in April in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health. In fact, the researchers found that most people do not objectively assess their level of physical activity.

For purposes of the study—which was fielded among 540 respondents from the United States; 748, from the Netherlands; and 248, from England –participants first reported their perceived level of activity during a specific week using a five-point scale, where answers range from inactive to very active. Then, researchers measured their actual level of activity using a fitness-tracking device worn on the respondent’s wrist.

Who miscalculates the most? In particular, U.S. respondents assumed that they are as active as their European counterparts, and older people believed that they have the same level of activity as young people.

For lead author Arie Kapteyn of the University of Southern California, the differences in how people perceive their fitness reflect their culture and environment. “People in different countries or … different age groups can [see] vastly different [meanings in] the same survey questions,” said Kapteyn, who is the executive director of the Center for Economic and Social Research at the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences.

On the whole, however, Americans demonstrated less physical fitness than subjects from the other two countries. Most Americans, for instance, rely heavily on cars, while the Dutch usually walk or ride bicycles to get to work or run errands.

Overall, respondents from the Netherlands and England believe they have a “moderately active” lifestyle. Participants from the United States, on the other hand, swing heavily to the extremes—with their reports indicating that they were “very active” or “very inactive.”

Older people also over-reported their level of physical activity: Fully 60% of older participants in the U.S. have a more inactive lifestyle than they initially reported; with 42% among the same Dutch age group; and 32%among U.K. respondents.

“Individuals in different age groups simply have different standards of what it means to be physically active,” Kapteyn explained of the results. “They adjust their standards based on their circumstances, including their age.”

The gaps between self-reported data and data from a wearable device highlight a gap in measuring fitness levels. Self-evaluations tend to be inaccurate, Kapteyn added, since they can be interpreted differently by people, depending on their age group and geographic region.

“With the wide availability of low-cost activity tracking devices, we have the potential to make future studies more reliable,” she added.

Indeed, the American College of Sports Medicine said, in December 2016, that wearable technology would be the top fitness trend for 2017 and the near future.

For its own study ACSM surveyed health and fitness professionals worldwide and came up with five “standout” fitness trends for the next couple of years. Among them were:

  1. Wearable technology: Activity trackers, smartwatches, heart rate monitors, and GPS tracking devices;
  2. Body-weight training: Not limited to just push-ups and pull-ups, this trend allows people to get “back to basics” with fitness;
  3. High-intensity interval training: HIIT involves a circuit of short bursts of activity, followed by a short period of rest or recovery (performed in less than 30 minutes);
  4. Educated trainers: Professionals certified through programs accredited by the appropriate authorities; and
  5. Strength training: Rated as an essential part of a complete exercise program (along with aerobic exercise and flexibility) for all physical activity levels and genders.

Research contact: kapteyn@usc.edu