Posts tagged with "Esquire"

What’s the skinny? Gen Z says boyfriend jeans are in; tight jeans are out

Febraury 16, 2021

A generational war has been playing out on TikTok for some time, although anyone over the age of 24 might be oblivious to the millions of “Millennial vs. Gen Z” videos that have appeared on the social media site in the past year, The Guardian reports.

But now the kids—also known as Zoomers—have turned their sights on something that Millennials apparently hold close—maybe too close: skinny jeans.

In scenes reminiscent of the OK Boomer meme that divided the generations in 2019, the videos are shining a light on how those in Generation Z—broadly defined as anyone born between the mid-90s and 2010—identify themselves in contrast with the generation(s) that came before them.

Since January, there have been 274,000 videos tagged “no skinny jeans” on TikTok and 8.3 million millennial v Gen Z videos. Earlier in the month the male supermodel Luka Sabbat told Esquire: “Skinny jeans don’t look as flattering nowadays.”

Indeed, a video made by TikTok user @momohkd instructs her 410,000 viewers to throw their skinny jeans away, set them alight, or cut them into something new. Like other users she says Millennials should stop wearing them to look youngerthe Guardian notes.

Skinny jeans became mainstream in 2005 after featuring in the Dior Homme autumn/winter collection, as overseen by Hedi Slimane. The size of the jeans—27 inches—was considered tiny—especially in contrast to the price tag: about £200 (US$238).

“Slimane’s skinny jeans were significant for their cut, but also for the bodies he showed them on —incredibly skinny bodies, both of male and female models,” says Emma McClendon, the author of Denim: Fashion’s Frontier. “This changed the marketing and styling of jeans advertisements away from the more sensual look that had dominated the market for bootcut, low-rise jeans to a more androgynous and impossibly thin figure.”

The skinny jean became part of the 2000s boho look of It-girls such as Paris Hilton, Lindsay Lohan, and Nicole Richie (as styled by Rachel Zoe); as well as a part of the alternative rock boom of the era, as seen on bands including the Strokes and Razorlight.

But, the Guardian reports, they never really went away: FLOTUS Jill Biden recently wore a pair on Instagram and they also became a distinguishing feature on the four lads in jeans meme.

What’s changing? There has been an increased focus on body inclusivity in fashion in recent years. In September Versace cast three plus-size models for the first time, and the plus-size model Paloma Elsesser was on the cover of U.S. Vogue in January..

On TikTok, Gen Z users have advocated for baggy jeans instead of slim-fit—eschewing the prescribed idea that thinness is attainable. According to market research company Edited, sales of men’s relaxed-fit jeans have increased by 15% and women’s wide-legged jeans are up 97%. The skinny v baggy online debate not only exposes a generational divide but other socioeconomic truths, too. “This is about issues of ‘taste’ but they intersect with issues of class, age, location, gender,” says McClendon.

The skinny jean, however, may prove hard to get rid of. Last month, Levi’s CEO Chip Bergh told investors he did not “think skinny jeans are ever going away on the women’s side of the business”, despite a clear trend towards “casual, looser-fitting clothes in general”, according to Business Insider.

McClendon added that they “always have a way of bouncing back. They are an extremely versatile and adaptable garment that carry such a multitude of cultural meanings that they will never be irrelevant.”

 Research contact: @guardian

Everything old is new again: Why young men are dressing old school

June 25, 2020

First it was Peaky Blinders; then, Harry Styles. Now ,flat caps, tailoring, and tank tops are back in fashion for a new generation, The Guardian reports. In fact, in the world of fashion, it is grandfathers who are having their day.

The grandpa look extends to all the usual items you might associate with the older man: jeans, collar shirts and cardigans, tank tops, and loafers. But this time they have been styled for a new generation.

Leaning heavily on the flat capped-influence of the TV show, Peaky Blinders, the look is something that’s been taken up by the spawn of celebrities (Brooklyn Beckham and Rocco Ritchie); as well as actors like Chris Evans (he made a cable knit sweater go viral in the filmKnives Out) and Armie Hammer.

Singer Harry Styles has carved out a niche in bespoke Gucci outfits. Indeed, as Esquire puts it: “Harry Styles is dressed like the man your grandma secretly obsessed over.”

During the menswear shows early in the year, the streets resembled a ballroom dance class for the over 65s: They were full of chic male fashionistas wearing more mules than trainers; more houndstooth coats than Puffas; and double breasted blazers instead of parkas, the Guardian notes.

A buttoned up, grandad-style of tailoring continued at the shows of Prada, Dior Men’s and Louis Vuitton, while the show from Bode  had a definite vaudeville septuagenarian air about it.

Indeed, according to The Guardian, the “set” was a community garden project (read: “cool allotment”), the collection featured a suit which looked like a pair of pyjamas, there were neckerchiefs, crocheted jackets, scarves with marbles attached, gardening gloves, and lots of animal-associated items (a bag shaped like a fish, sheep patterns, cow print). The brand promote an idea of nostalgia, repurposing quilts from the Victorian era.

Lovers Rock, a collection from Grace Wales Bonner, featured flat caps, roll necks and fleece jackets that were influenced by the older generation. “It’s a reflection of my family on my father’s side,” she said. “My grandad came from Jamaica in the 1950s.”

“It’s about retreating into a wardrobe that won’t be recognizable to anyone under 25,” says Esquire’s Digital Style Editor Murray Clark. “Wide pleated trousers of the thirties, … sweater vests, and so on. It’s not new per se, but to Gen Z, this is new, and a stitch beyond their cultural reference points.”

Research contact: @guardian

 

Orthorexia: When ‘clean’ eating becomes an obsession

October 9, 2019

Besides his political views (“incorrect”), Bill Maher of HBO’s Real Time is known for his religious beliefs (none), his love of animals and children (complete and completely missing), and his views on how to stay healthy (“clean” eating).

In fact, in a 2017 interview with Esquire magazine, Maher took the writer to his kitchen and showed him “lunch,” which consisted of “Sesame seeds, flaxseeds, sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, millet, barley, rye,” he said. “They’re very good for you. He mashed the seeds with water in a machine that looked like a coffee grinder. After the mixture was allowed to sit for a few hours, he added black cherry concentrate—and that was his midday meal.

While his diet may seem extreme, he is a member of a growing sector of the population that is committed to eating clean—whether that may be gluten-free, dairy-free, raw food, or all-organic. Their ethos: Choosing only whole foods in their natural state and avoiding processed ones will improve your health.

According to an October 7 report by NPR, it’s not necessarily a bad thing to eat this way, but sometimes these kinds of food preferences can begin to take over people’s lives, making them fear social events where they won’t be able to find the “right” foods. When a healthful eating pattern goes too far, it may turn into an eating disorder that scientists are just beginning to study.

However it is integrated into a person’s lifestyle, orthorexia is a fairly recent phenomenon. NPR notes that Dr. Steven Bratman, an alternative medicine practitioner in the 1990s, first coined the term in an essay in the nonscientific Yoga Journal in 1997. Many of his patients eschewed traditional medicine and believed that the key to good health was simply eating the “right” foods. Some of them would ask him what foods they should cut out.

“People would think they should cut out all dairy and they should cut out all lentils, all wheat … And it dawned on me gradually that many of these patients, their primary problem was that they were … far too strict with themselves,” Dr, Bratman recently told NPR.

So Bratman made up the name orthorexia, borrowing ortho from the Greek word meaning “right” and -orexia meaning “appetite.” He added nervosa as a reference to anorexia nervosa, the well-known eating disorder which causes people to starve themselves to be thin.

“From then on, whenever a patient would ask me what food to cut out, I would say, ‘We need to work on your orthorexia.’ This would often make them laugh and let them loosen up, and sometimes it helped people move from extremism to moderation,” he recalls.

Bratman had no idea that the concept of “clean eating” would explode over the next two decades.

Where dieters once gobbled down no-sugar gelatin or fat-free shakes, now they might seek out organic kale and wild salmon.

The rise of celebrity diet gurus and glamorous food photos on social media reinforce the idea that eating only certain foods and avoiding others is a virtue — practically a religion.

Dr. Sondra Kronberg, founder and executive director of the Eating Disorder Treatment Collaborative outside New York City, has seen a lot of diet trends over the past 40 years, she told NPR.

“So orthorexia is a reflection on a larger scale of the cultural perspective on ‘eating cleanly,’ eating … healthfully, avoiding toxins—including foods that might have some ‘super power,’ ” she says.

Now, Kronberg and other nutritionists applaud efforts to eat healthfully. The problem comes, she says, when you are so focused on your diet that “it begins to infringe on the quality of your life—your ability to be spontaneous and engage.” That’s when you should start to worry about an eating disorder, she told the news outlet.

“In the case of orthorexia, it centers around eating ‘cleanly’ and purely, where the other eating disorders center around size and weight and a drive for thinness,” she says.

Sometimes these problems overlap, and some people who only eat “clean” foods miss critical nutrients from the foods they cut out or don’t consume enough calories. “It could become a health hazard and ultimately, it can be fatal,” Kronberg says.

Orthorexia is not listed specifically in the DSM—the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders— but that doesn’t mean it’s untreatable.

Eating disorders can strike anyone, according to the National Eating Disorders Association. If you think you have orthorexia or any eating disorder, it’s important to seek professional help and friends who support you, the association urges.

Research contact: @NPR