Posts tagged with "Emoji"

Facebook expunges Trump ads featuring red triangular symbol used by Nazis

June 22, 2020

Even Mark Zuckerberg won’t tolerate Nazi symbols: Facebook on Thursday, June 18, announced that it had removed campaign posts and advertisements from the Trump campaign featuring an upside down red triangle symbol used by the Third Reich to identify political opponents, according to a report by NPR.

The red triangles are anathema to Jewish communities worldwide. Some prisoners in Nazi concentration camps were identified with colored inverted triangles sewn onto their uniforms , others triangles were affixed to the uniforms of sympathizers who had tried to save them, according to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum.

The posts, according to a Facebook spokesperson, violated the social network’s policy against hate. “Our policy prohibits using a banned hate group’s symbol to identify political prisoners without the context that condemns or discusses the symbol,” the spokesperson told NPR.

One of the ads from the Donald J. Trump for President team that prominently displayed the red triangle claimed that “dangerous MOBS of far-left groups are running through our streets and causing absolute mayhem.” The ad went on to say protesters are destroying America’s cities by rioting. “It’s absolute madness,” the ad said.

Bend the Arc, a Jewish action committee, immediately posted a tweet disparaging Trump and his followers: “The President of the United States is campaigning for reelection using a Nazi concentration camp symbol,” the tweet said, adding, “Nazis used the red triangle to mark political prisoners and people who rescued Jews.
Trump & the RNC are using it to smear millions of protestors. Their masks are off.”

The Trump campaign responded by drawing a lighthearted comparison to the red triangle symbol: “This is an emoji.”

Trump campaign spokesperson Tim Murtaugh said that some products are sold online that use the inverted red triangle in Antifa imagery, although experts told NPR that the red triangle is not a commonly adopted symbol among anti-fascist activists.

We would note that Facebook still has an inverted red triangle emoji in use, which looks exactly the same, so it’s curious that they would target only this ad,” Murtaugh said.

The campaign also said that the symbol is not in the Anti-Defamation League Hate Symbols Database.

In an interview with NPR, Jonathan Greenblatt, CEO of the Anti-Defamation League, pointed out that the database is not a collection of historical Nazi imagery.

“It’s a database of symbols commonly used by modern extremist groups and white supremacists in the United States,” he said.

Greenblatt said removing the posts should not have been a hard call. He said the Trump campaign should apologize.

“Intentionally or otherwise, using symbols that were once used by the Nazis is not a good look for someone running for the White House,” he said. “It isn’t difficult for one to criticize a political opponent without using Nazi-era imagery.”

Earlier Greenblatt had tweeted that “ignorance is no excuse for using Nazi-related symbols.”

However, it is unlikely that President Trump, who is an admirer of Adolf Hitler’s treatise, Mein Kampf, would not have known about the red triangle.

Research contact: @NPR

Jared Kushner makes his mark as a Millennial

December 5, 2017

Despite his position of power and influence, Jared Kushner, age 36, turns out to be a typical Millennial in many ways. Not only is he a multitasker—assigned to solve a swathe of issues, from the Middle East standoff to the reinvention of government—but President Donald Trump’s son-in-law and senior adviser has a soft spot for smiley faces, emoji and exclamation marks, we learned recently from Newsweek.

Emails between Kushner and the administration of New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, obtained within the last couple of weeks by Politico, have been rife with multiple exclamation marks, double smiley faces, and “general sunniness.” the weekly news outlet reported.

“Thank you so much for getting involved in the issue with my friend Sandeep. He said you did a masterful job helping to create a true win win win for everyone involved!!!” he wrote to New York City Deputy Mayor Alicia Glen back in February 2015 after she helped one of his buddies with his proposal for a school.

“I think this was more effective than a letter :))” Ivanka Trump’s husband again emailed Glen following the publication of an editorial by his then-newspaper the New York Observer, which supported City Hall’s position on a real estate tax-abatement program.

And in spring 2015, Kushner emailed Glen to say that he couldn’t meet with her because he had to go on jury duty for two weeks, which he blithely described as a privilege.

“We are lucky to live in an amazing democracy!” Kushner effervescently wrote.

A Harris Poll found this past June that 36% of Millennials, ages 18 to 36, were more likely to use emojis, GIFs and stickers “to better communicate their thoughts and feelings than words do.”

This is more than twice the percentage of people over age 65 who use the symbols to communicate, Time magazine reported.

There is just one catch: Kushner may not be very smiley at the moment, as the Russia probe gains momentum. However, while Kushner has many of the same problems with Special Counsel Robert Mueller that his father-in-law does—especially when it comes to the investigation into obstruction of justice—he may get a pass, if the president uses his power of pardon.

If so, we can count on him to keep using those smiley faces for many months to come.

Research contact: mswiatkowski@politico.com