Posts tagged with "emails"

AOC: Stephen Miller ‘must resign’ after leak of his white nationalist emails, xenophobic rants

November 15, 2019

Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-New York), also known as AOC, has called on Senior White House Adviser Stephen Miller to resign immediately amid reports that he regularly pushed white nationalist talking points and xenophobic rants in a series of leaked emails sent in the months before the 2016 presidential election.

In addition, the Huffington Post reported this week, Miller “bemoaned opposition to Confederate symbols following a mass shooting in a black church in South Carolina and embraced immigration policies once lauded by Adolf Hitler.”

The Southern Poverty Law Center published an investigation from its Hatewatch blog on November 14 after reviewing more than 900 messages that Miller sent to the conservative news outlet Breitbart from March 2015 through June 2016.

More than 80% of the emails related to “or appear on threads relating to the subjects of race or immigration,” the group found, and many sought to promote far-right extremist ideas and anti-immigration messaging.

But despite the fact that Miller sent the messages before the election, @AOC tweeted on Tuesday that the trove of uncovered emails should bring the White House aide’s immediate resignation.

“Stephen Miller, Trump’s architect of mass human rights abuses at the border (including child separation & detention camps w/ child fatalities) has been exposed as a bonafide white nationalist,” the lawmaker wrote Tuesday night on Twitter. “He’s still at the White House shaping US immigration policy.”

She added, “Miller must resign. Now.

The Trump administration refused to discuss the SPLC’s investigation on Tuesday. White House press secretary Stephanie Grisham said she had not seen the report but called the SPLC an “utterly-discredited, long-debunked far-left smear organization” in a statement to HuffPost. 

She added that the nonprofit group, which regularly defends civil liberties and shines a light on hate groups, was “beneath public discussion.”

Hatewatch said Tuesday that many of Miller’s emails were centered on race and immigration, calling his perspective “repetitious” and highly focused on “ending nonwhite immigration to the United States.” They were given to the news outlet by a former Breitbart editor, Katie McHugh, who said they “clearly illustrate his beliefs, which until now have not been made explicit and known to the American people.”

Miller has been the architect of many of President Donald Trump’s hard-line immigration efforts and one of the administration’s most vocal defenders.

“Americans should be terrified by the casual way that Stephen Miller, who has enormous influence in the White House, shares racist content and speaks the language of white nationalists in emails to people he apparently considered fellow travelers,” Michael Edison Hayden, an investigative reporter at Hatewatch, said in a statement Tuesday.

Read the full investigation at the SPLC.

Research contact: @HuffPost

Too much information (TMI) is now a worldwide problem

April 17, 2019

Are you media-bashed? Are there just too many tweets, hashtags, news reports, Facebook comments, curated photos, streaming videos, surveys, petitions, and emails for you to process in a day—and more coming all the time?

You have plenty of company—based on findings of a study conducted in Europe by the Technical University of Denmark, Technische Universität Berlin, Max Planck Institute for Human Development, and University College Cork; and published by the journal, Nature Communications.

Indeed, researchers have found that our collective attention span is narrowing due to the negative effects of an overabundance of social media, plus the hectic 24-hour news cycle to which we exposed.

What’s more, collectively, sociologists, psychologists, and teachers have warned of an emerging crisis stemming from a  fear of missing out (FOMO), the pressure to keep up-to-date on social media, and breaking news coming at us 24/7. So far, the evidence to support these claims has only been hinted at or has been largely anecdotal. There has been an obvious lack of a strong empirical foundation.

“It seems that the allocated attention in our collective minds has a certain size, but that the cultural items competing for that attention have become more densely packed. This would support the claim that it has indeed become more difficult to keep up to date on the news cycle, for example.” says Professor Sune Lehmann from DTU Compute.

The scientists have studied Twitter data from 2013 to 2016, books from Google Books going back 100 years, movie ticket sales going back 40 years, and citations of scientific publications from the last 25 years. In addition, they have gathered data from Google Trends (2010-2018), Reddit (2010-2015), and Wikipedia (2012-2017).

When looking into the global daily top 50 hashtags on Twitter, the scientists found that peaks became increasingly steep and frequent: In 2013 a hashtag stayed in the top 50 for an average of 17.5 hours. This gradually decreases to 11.9 hours in 2016.

This trend is mirrored when looking at other domains, online and offline–and covering different periods. Looking, for instance, at the occurrence of the same five-word phrases (n-grams) in Google Books for the past 100 years, and the success of top box office movies. The same goes for Google searches and the number of Reddit comments on individual submissions.

“We wanted to understand which mechanisms could drive this behavior. Picturing topics as species that feed on human attention, we designed a mathematical model with three basic ingredients: “hotness,” aging, and the thirst for something new.” says Dr. Philipp Hövel, lecturer for applied mathematics, University College Cork.

When more content is produced in less time, it exhausts the collective attention earlier. The shortened peak of public interest for one topic is directly followed by the next topic, because of the fierce competition for novelty.

“The one parameter in the model that was key in replicating the empirical findings was the input rate— the abundance of information. The world has become increasingly well connected in the past decades. This means that content is increasing in volume, which exhausts our attention and our urge for ‘newness’ causes us to collectively switch between topics more rapidly.” says postdoc Philipp Lorenz-Spreen, Max Planck Institute for Human Development.

Since the available amount of attention remains more or less the same, the result is that people are more rapidly made aware of something happening and lose interest more quickly. However, the study does not address attention span on the level of the individual person, says Sune Lehmann:

Our data only supports the claim that our collective attention span is narrowing. Therefore, as a next step, it would be interesting to look into how this affects individuals, since the observed developments may have negative implications for an individual’s ability to evaluate the information they consume. Acceleration increases, for example, the pressure on journalists to keep up with an ever-changing news landscape. We hope that more research in this direction will inform the way we design new communication systems, such that information quality does not suffer even when new topics appear at increasing rates.”

Research contact: @DTUtweet

Like Trump, Millennials are ‘breaking up’ via text, tweet and email

March 26, 2018

Remember the breakup by Post-It Note? Today’s Millennials are so over that type of politesse: Instead, they are taking their cue from President Donald Trump and instead using a phone call (29%), a text (17%), a letter (10%) or an email (8%) to keep their distance, yet inform that special person that he or she is now an “insignificant other.”

The people who still break off relationships in the old-fashioned way—face-to-face—are more likely to be in a mature age group, based on findings of a poll by YouGov released on March 20. Indeed, 66% of respondents  over the age of 55 (66%) report that they have broken off a romantic liaison face-to-face, while fewer than half of Millennials (41%)  can say the same.

Many (58%) of respondents said that they wanted to limit their own exposure to the messy emotions that come at the end of a hookup.

Both sexes agree on this matter, although women (62%) are more likely than men (55%) to report that they view breakups as situations that leave them with raw emotions and shaky self-images. Indeed, men are more apt (31%) to characterize the end of a fling as casual or civil than are their female counterparts (20%).

However, Americans over the age of 55 are more likely (63%) than younger adults to say that breakups often end badly. Nearly 30% of Millennials and Gen X-ers view breakups as casual, whereas just 20% of Americans over the age of 55 can say the same.

More than a third of 35- to 54-year-olds (37%) say they have had a relationship end over the phone, while a similar number of 18- to 34-year-olds (34%) say they’ve ended things with a text. These technologies allow for fewer face-to-face breakups, which may suggest why many in these age groups say they view breakups as more civil.

Most find that there is little hope of things improving between two people who have ended a relationship. On this matter, Americans tend to say that staying in touch with an ex-love will do more harm (38%) than good (17%).

Research contact: Hoang.Nguyen@YouGov.com