Posts tagged with "Diversity"

MasterCard announces True Name card to address realities of the LGBTQ community

June 21, 2019

Imagine if Caitlyn Jenner were still using a credit or debit card with the imprinted name, Bruce Jenner. Every time she used her payments card, her transition would be exposed—and she could legitimately be asked to prove her identity.

That’s a reality for many transgender and nonbinary people—and one that MasterCard aims to address with its new True Name program.

Cardholders soon will be able to swap out MasterCard-branded credit, debit, or prepaid cards imprinted with their “dead name” with new ones featuring the names they actually use. Experts say it’s a first for the financial services industry.

According to Healthline, deadnaming occurs when someone, intentionally or not, refers to a person who’s transgender by the name they used before they transitioned. You may also hear it described as referring to someone by their “birth name” or their “given name.”

On June 17, MasterCard announced that it was making a commitment to address that challenge. In a press release, the Purchase, New York-based payments company said, “ We are working with partners to create a product, as well as a sensitive and private process free of personal questions, that will allow for true names, not deadnames, to appear on cards without the requirement of a legal name change. This will ease a major pain point for the transgender and non-binary community.”

MasterCard calls on the industry to apply these standards for everyone, ensuring a way for people’s financial products to reflect their true identity.

Overall, nearly one-third (32%) of individuals who have shown IDs with a name or gender that did not match their presentation reported negative experiences, such as being harassed, denied services, and/or attacked, according to the National Center for Transgender Equality. As such, many transgender individuals choose to forego the cost, complexity, and anxiety associated with official name and gender changes. Until now, this discrimination has carried through to their cards and payment mechanisms.

In a panel discussion on Monday with the New York City Commission on Human Rights, MasterCard unveiled this initiative and is working to bring the True Name card to market.

“We are allies of the LGBTQ community, which means if we see a need or if this community is not being served in the most inclusive way, we want to be a force for change to help address and alleviate unnecessary pain points,” said Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer for MasterCard Randall Tucker. “This translates not only for our MasterCard employee community but for our cardholders and the communities in which we operate more broadly. Our vision is that every card should be for everyone.”

Research contact: @MasterCardNews

Harvard Med creates more diverse image by taking down 31 portraits

June 20, 2018

Harvard Medical School is doing a different kind of “scrubbing up” these days, according to a June 15 report by Campus Reform. The school is “cleaning up” its professional and public image—and promoting diversity—by removing 31 portraits of former department heads from a lecture-room wall where they have been hanging for decades. The reason? All of the paintings are of men. And 30 out of 31 of those men are white, while one is Asian.

That made for an uncomfortable contrast, as the Boston Globe noted in its own story on June 14, because the employees and students who regularly gather there include women, blacks, and Hispanics.

“School officials confirmed … that the portraits of 31 medical school deans—which formerly hung in the school’s Louis Bornstein Family Amphitheater [at Brigham and Women’s Hospital]— have been ‘dispersed’ to various lobbies and conference rooms,” Campus Reform disclosed.

The move may have been prompted by a recent call to action by WhiteCoats4BlackLives,a national activist group that aims to eliminate racial bias in the practice of medicine. The group recently targeted Harvard Medical School for allegedly promoting racial bias, the Globe also reported—claiming that there were a “dearth of plaques, statues, portraits, and building names on campuses that acknowledge contributions from physicians of color.”

Indeed, the group published a Racial Justice Report Card this year that found that only 10.7% of medical school graduates in 2016 were Black, Latinx, or Native American.  This represents a major issue because medical schools are the gatekeepers to the health professions

What’s more, the group says, patients of color often are unable to access care at academic medical centers in their communities. For example, black patients in New York City are less than half as likely as white patients to receive care at academic medical centers.

The Racial Justice Report Card, compiled for the first time this year, grades ten major medical schools on 15 anti-racism factors—and provides an overall grade for each institution, as follows: Harvard: B; Johns Hopkins: C+; Mt. Sinai: B-; University of Pennsylvania: C; Thomas Jefferson University: C; UC-San Francisco: B-; University of Michigan: B-; University of Pittsburgh: B-; Washington University in St. Louis: B-; and Yale: C. Not one of them came in with a B+ or an A.

The hospital’s president, Dr. Betsy Nabel, told the Globe that she had considered ending the tradition of hanging pictures of retired chairs in the auditorium for several years, especially as more women and minorities train as doctors at the hospital. “I have watched the faces of individuals as they have come into Bornstein,’’ Nabel said in an interview. “I have watched them look at the walls. I read on their faces ‘Interesting. but I am not represented here.’ That got me thinking maybe it’s time that we think about respecting our past in a different way.’’

Research contact: national@whitecoats4blacklives.org