Posts tagged with "Cognitive decline"

‘We want to be the Nike of brain health’

September 30, 2021

A new mission-driven startup founded by Maria Shriver and one of her sons with Arnold Schwarzenegger, Patrick Schwarzenegger, casts a spotlight on cognitive wellness, Food Business News reports.

 Los Angeles-based MOSH (which stands for Maria Owings Shriver Health) is debuting a line of protein bars formulated with adaptogens and nutrients linked to brain health. A percentage of sales supports Alzheimer’s research. 

Shriver—an award-winning journalist, author, and former First Lady of California—is a force in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease, which a decade ago claimed the life of her father, American diplomat, politician and activist Sargent Shriver. Following his diagnosis, she penned the children’s book “What’s Happening to Grandpa?” and produced the documentary series “The Alzheimer’s Project.”

 She published the groundbreaking Shriver Report—revealing that Alzheimer’s disease disproportionately affects women—and subsequently launched the Women’s Alzheimer’s Movement, a nonprofit organization advancing gender-based brain health research.

 “We’ve learned so much in my two decades of advocacy about what actually impacts our brain health,” Shriver told Food Business News. “When I got involved with Alzheimer’s, people were only looking in one space; they were looking at plaques and tangles, and they were researching men.

 “Now,” says Shriver, “we know so much of what we do on a day-to-day basis starting in our 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, particularly with women who are perimenopausal and menopausal. How you sleep, how you exercise, and what you eat have a big impact on your brain functioning at its best.”

 Shriver and Schwarzenegger partnered with brain health experts and nutritionists to develop the protein bars, which are available in peanut butter, chocolate and peanut butter chocolate flavors. Ashwagandha, lion’s mane mushroom, collagen, medium-chain triglyceride oil, vitamins B12 and D3 and omega-3 fatty acids are among the brain-boosting ingredients included in the recipes.

 Nutrition plays a role in delaying or preventing cognitive decline. Recent research suggests the ketogenic diet may help reduce the risk of neurodegenerative diseases, Shriver noted. She also cited research examining the effects of sugar on brain health.

“That’s why this bar is formulated with zero added sugar,” she said.

 Shriver, who often relies on protein bars to fuel her busy lifestyle, said the company plans to launch “a whole slew of products” in the future.

 “We want to be the Nike of brain health,” Schwarzenegger added. “We want to get consumers shopping in different categories that are good for brain and body—whether that is protein bars, whether that is hydration, whether that is different protein powders or supplements.”

 He said the protein bars had been in development for a year and a half. The team tested various iterations with scores of consumers. Supply chain disruptions and pandemic restrictions further delayed the launch.

 The bars, featuring packaging design inspired by a brain scan, are sold at moshlife.com. Proceeds from each purchase are donated to Women’s Alzheimer Movement.

 Research contact: @FoodBizNews

Poll: Few U.S. voters believe Trump, Biden are in robust good health

June 25, 2020

A new POLITICO/Morning Consult poll has found that 33% of U.S. voters rate President Donald Trump’s health as poor—and 27% are not so sure that former Vice President Joe Biden is in fine fettle either.

Conversely, 30% believe that the 74-year-old incumbent POTUS is in good or excellent health; and 39% believe Biden is hale and hearty.

Last week, the Trump campaign launched a website citing “Biden’s descent into incoherence” and arguing the former vice president is in cognitive decline. Trump’s rhetoric has constantly attacked attack Biden as “sleepy.”

Yet days after the rollout of the website, Trump found himself on the defensive regarding his physical well-being, Politico reports. Footage from his June 13 graduation address at the U.S. Military Academy showed the president haltingly descending a ramp and using two hands to drink a glass of water.

Although the videos circulated among liberal circles online for a number of days, the story was largely forgotten before Trump devoted significant time to addressing the incidents during his rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma on June 20.

Voters will split sharply along party lines in the POLITICO/Morning Consult poll. Fifty-seven percent of Democrats said Trump was in poor health, while 52% of Republicans said the same for Biden. Just 7% of Republicans rated Trump’s health as poor, and only 6 percent of Democrats said Biden was in poor health.

“The state of President Trump’s health is the latest issue to fall along party lines. While a plurality of Republican voters rate the president’s health as ‘excellent,’ only 3% of Democrats say the same,” said Kyle Dropp, co-founder and chief research officer at Morning Consult.

If elected, Biden would be the oldest person to assume the presidency on Inauguration Day—surpassing Trump, who is the current record-holder.

The former vice president, known for his history of gaffes, has had to combat questions about his age and health throughout his primary campaign.

Neither man has released his full health records.

The POLITICO/Morning Consult poll was conducted June 19-21, surveying 1,988 registered voters.

Research contact: @politico

Walking on eggshells? A slower gait can be indicative of cognitive decline

October 29, 2019

Those who “step lively” are more likely to survive to an older age. In fact, scientists reporting in a special supplement to the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease say that gait disorders, particularly slowing gait, should be considered a marker of future cognitive decline. They propose testing motor performance as well as cognitive performance in older adults with mild cognitive impairments.

“There is an emerging focus on the importance of assessing motor performance as well as cognitive performance to predict cognitive function loss,” explained guest editor Manuel Montero-Odasso, MD, PhD, Departments of Medicine (Geriatric Medicine), and Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, University of Western Ontario, and Gait and Brain Lab, Parkwood Institute, Lawson Health Research Institute, Ontario. “In the past two decades, large epidemiological studies have shown that gait disorders, particularly slowing gait, may be present at early stages of dementia or may even predict who will be at risk of progressing to dementia. Subtle impairments in gait are more prevalent in older adults with cognitive impairments and dementia—and are also associated with an increased risk of falls.”

He and his co-authors believe that gait testing may help to detect the subgroup of at-risk patients who may benefit the most from invasive diagnostic procedures or early interventions. “We believe simple gait testing should be part of routine clinical assessment for older adults with cognitive impairments. Implementing this in clinics may be a challenge, but we hope the evidence presented in this issue will lead to progress in this area,” said guest editor George Perry, PhD, editor-in-chief of JAD, Professor of Biology, Semmes Distinguished University Chair in Neurobiology, The University of Texas at San Antonio.

“Finding early dementia detection methods is vital,” added Dr. Montero-Odasso. “It is conceivable that in the future we will be able to make the diagnosis of AD and other dementias before people even have significant memory loss. In older adults with moderate cognitive impairment, slowing down their usual walking by more than 20% when they add a cognitive task is indicative of a seven-fold increased risk to develop AD in a five-year timeframe. We believe that gait, as a complex brain-motor task, provides a golden window of opportunity to detect individuals at higher risk of dementia who can benefit the most from more invasive testing or early interventions.”

Around 50 million people worldwide have dementia. Every year there are nearly 10 million new cases. AD is the most common form, accounting for around 60% to 70% of cases. Dementia is characterized by a progressive loss of cognitive function—affecting memory, thinking, orientation, comprehension, calculation, learning capacity, language, and judgment. Impairments in gait are more common in dementia than in normal aging and may be related to the severity of cognitive decline.

Research contact: @journal_ad