Posts tagged with "CNN"

Proud Boys deny sending threatening emails to Democratic voters in multiple states

October 22, 2020

Law enforcement officials have been notified that voters in multiple states have received personalized emails purporting to be from the Proud Boys—a far-right, neo-fascist white supremacist group. The messaging is filled with intimidating threats aimed at Democrats, if they do not change their vote to Republican, The Hill reports.

CNN and The Washington Post first reported that voters in Pennsylvania, Arizona, Alaska, and Florida all said they received threatening emails warning them to vote for President Donald Trump in the upcoming election, adding that the mysterious sender claimed to have access to voter history and “will come after you” should they fail to vote for the president.

“You will vote for Trump on Election Day or we will come after you,” reads one email obtained by the Post,. Dozens were reportedly sent, including more than 180 to students, faculty and staff of the University of Florida, a school spokesperson told CNN.

Chris Krebs, the director of the U.S. Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency tweeted that the agency was “aware of threatening emails with misleading info about the secrecy of your vote.”

“This is what we mean by not falling for sensational and unverified claims. The last line of defense in election security is you—the American voter. So be prepared, be a smart consumer and sharer of information. Vote with confidence,” added Chris Krebs.

Elections officials in Alaska and Florida confirmed to CNN that they were aware of the emails, with Alaska’s Division of Elections telling the network that federal authorities had been alerted. Representatives with elections boards in Pennsylvania and Arizona did not immediately return The Hill’s requests for comment. A spokesperson for the FBI’s field office in Anchorage also did not immediately return a request for comment from the Post.

The leader of the Proud Boys, Enrique Tarrio, told USA Today and CNN in a statement that his group was not responsible for the emails, which appeared to have been sent from an email address affiliated with the group but may have been the result of spoofing software, one expert told CNN.

“No, it wasn’t us. The people [who sent the emails] used a spoofing email that pretended to be us,” Tarrio said. “Whoever did this should be in prison for a long time.”

“We have spoken to the FBI and are working with them. I hope whoever did this is arrested for voter intimidation and for maliciously impersonating our group,” he added.

Trump recently faced criticism after he demurred follow his prompting by Fox News’s Chris Wallace to disavow the group during the first presidential debate between him and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden.

“Stand back and stand by,” Trump said during the contentious debate.

Research contact: @thehil

Editor’s note: According to multiple sources, U.S. officials on Wednesday night accused Iran of targeting American voters with faked but menacing emails and warned that both Iran and Russia had obtained voter data that could be used to endanger the upcoming election.

 

‘Imagine’ John Lennon on TikTok: The singer’s estate honors his 80th birthday online

October 13, 2020

Some of John Lennon’s most memorable songs are being made available on the app TikTok, in honor of the singer-songwriter’s 80th birthday, which would have been celebrated on October 9, CNN reports.

The John Lennon Estate partnered with TikTok to bring Lennon’s music to the platform to put together a dedicated playlist of some of his best solo songs: “Instant Karma! (We All Shine On),” “Imagine,” “Mind Games,” “Beautiful Boy,” “Woman,” “Happy Xmas (War Is Over),” “Give Peace a Chance,” “Stand By Me,” “Nobody Told Me,” “Remember,” and “Gimme Some Truth.” (These songs were released by Lennon after The Beatles broke up in 1970.)

We’re super excited to launch my dad’s official TikTok account and cannot wait to see what his fans all over the world create using his music and his message of peace and love,” Sean Ono Lennon, the singer’s son with Yoko Ono, of his father’s music launching on TikTok in a statement.

TikTok previously partnered with the estate of the musician Prince to bring the late musician’s music to the platform.

Research contact: @CNN

Dire straits: The decline (and feasible fall) of Lindsey Graham

October 13, 2020

At the 2012 Republican National Convention, Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, then a champion of bipartisan immigration reform, warned his party they had a problem. “We’re not generating enough angry white guys to stay in business for the long term,” he said, according to a report by The Boston Globe.

Now, he and his 2012 rhetoric are unrecognizable.

Indeed, a recent 81-second attack ad by the LindseyMustGo group shows the senator as he used to be—blasting Trump as a “jackass,” “kook,” “crazy” and “unfit for office” before the 2016 election—followed by clips of him today, heaping praise on the president, even calling for him to receive the Nobel Peace Prize.

Over the past few years, the third-term senator has jettisoned the conciliatory political persona he used to display and hitched his wagon to President Donald Trump’s fiery star, which seemed like an obvious recipe for 2020 success in a red state like South Carolina.

But he is now embroiled in the battle of his career against Jaime Harrison, a former state party chair trying to be the first Black Democrat elected to the Senate from the Deep South. Harrison raised a staggering $57 million over the last three months, and the Cook Political Report rates the race a “toss-up” — a startling turn of events for South Carolina, which hasn’t elected a Democratic senator or governor in more than 20 years.

According to the Globe, “The race has been turbocharged by Graham’s outsize role as a defender of the president and a key player in his effort to reshape the Supreme Court. As the chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee, he will preside over the confirmation hearing of Judge Amy Coney Barrett beginning Monday — proceeding despite a clarion 2018 promise not to fill a Supreme Court vacancy so close to this election.”

Graham has called the confirmation process the “Super Bowl” of politics, and he is betting it will fire up South Carolina conservatives, who have long distrusted him, even as it riles up the Democrats determined to highlight his hypocrisy as another reason to send him packing.

“They hate me. This is not about Mr. Harrison. This is about liberals hating my guts,” a pugilistic Graham declared during a debate with Harrison on October 3.

But it’s more than that, Dan Carter, an emeritus professor at the University of South Carolina told the Globe.  “If Graham’s in any jeopardy at all,” he said, “it’s because of Trump and the fact that he had to go through all these contortions to protect himself on the right in the new Trump party.”

Graham, a former military lawyer, flipped his congressional district here in the upstate region of South Carolina in 1994 after a century of Democratic control, campaigning for term limits and against gays in the military. In 2003, he went on to the Senate, where he had a moderate countenanc —an impression fueled by his close friendship with Arizona Republican John McCain; and by his eagerness to join such bipartisan groups as the Gang of Eight. which worked on immigration reform during the Obama presidency. He also crafted climate legislation with Democrats.

He treated the Tea Party movement with undisguised disdain and survived primary challenges from the right in 2014 in part because so many conservatives jumped in to split the field, but he didn’t see the other asteroid that was coming to reshape his party. Graham’s doomed 2016 presidential bid — in which he called then-candidate Trump a “kook” who was “unfit for office” — flamed out before Iowa.

By 2018, he had moved toward Trump, becoming a golfing buddy of the president and an angry defender of his Supreme Court pick that year, Brett Kavanaugh, during a messy confirmation process that turned on accusations of sexual assault. In a party that had changed around him, Graham’s days of presenting himself as a moderate were long gone.

“As it relates to crossing the aisle or building consensus, I think he is fundamentally a builder and not a destroyer,” said Karen Floyd, the former chairwoman of the state’s Republican Party. “When the timing permits, he’ll build more.”

Democrats have gleefully seized on the shift as evidence Graham can’t be trusted. “Lindsey Graham is a flip-flopper. Flipping flippity flippity flop,” said Trav Robertson, the chair of the South Carolina Democrats. “And that’s why Lindsey Graham’s gonna lose.”

Research contact: @BostonGlobe

Found money: 66% of U.S. firms still plan to give bonuses next year; 50% are sticking to pay raises

October 8, 2020

As Americans dig deep to pay their monthly living costs during a COVID-19 pandemic and an economic downturn, one-third of U.S. companies (35%) now say they have reduced their projections for pay raises next year, relative to their previous estimates; while half are sticking to their original targets, CNN reports.

That’s based on results of a new survey of more than 700 U.S. companies conducted by employment advisory firm Willis Towers Watson.

On average, companies now expect to raise salaries for non-executives by an average of 2.6%, down from the 2.8% they initially projected for all employees. For executives, the estimated hike will be 2.5%. The main reasons cited for the drop: Weaker financial results, cost management, and budget cuts.

By comparison, average annual pay raises for all employees have been about 3% since the Great Recession.

The survey also found about 10% of companies are not planning to offer salary increases at all.

“For many companies, reducing salary budgets, and in some cases, suspending pay raises, was the most viable option, as they balance remaining competitive with maintaining financial stability,” said Catherine Hartmann, the North America Rewards practice leader at Willis Towers Watson, based in Arlington, Virginia.

In terms of bonuses, the good news is two-thirds of employers (66%) are still planning to offer them. But the survey found companies are most likely to pay bonuses to executives and those in management. To help working parents, companies are getting creative

Meanwhile, one-quarter of companies (26%) say they’re still undecided on whether they’ll be able to pay bonuses at all, and nearly one in ten companies (8%) say they won’t do so.

However, CNN opines, other things may matter more in 2021: For those still working, given the stresses that the pandemic has created— particularly for working parents of young children—company benefits that increase flexibility and paid time off may well be perceived by employees to be just as valuable as any paycheck hike or bonus during this unprecedented and difficult chapter.

Research contact: @CNN

Absent the truth, Trump team claims that Dems want to scare GOP voters away from absentee balloting

September 28, 2020

Robocalls sent by Trump surrogates Kimberly Guilfoyle and the President’s daughter-in-law Lara Trump are encouraging Republican voters to use absentee ballots to vote in November, calling them one of the “best ways” to support President Trump in the coming election, CNN reports.

In their phone scripts, Guilfoyle and Trump  attempt to draw a false distinction between absentee voting and other forms of mail-in voting. Guilfoyle’s call goes so far as to claim the “radical left” wants to “confuse you” on mail-in voting and that “Democrats want to scare you away from voting absentee.”

“Absentee voting and universal vote-by-mail may sound similar but could not be more different,” says Guilfoyle. “Absentee voting is safe, secure and supported by President Trump. The radical left wants universal vote-by-mail, which is proven to be filled with fraud, abuse and mistakes.”

None of those assertions about vote-by-mail is true.

Trump’s daughter-in-law uses a similar script in her robocall, encouraging listeners to fill out the absentee ballot sent to voters from the Trump campaign, before accusing “radical Democrats” of playing politics during the coronavirus pandemic.

According to data from NoMoRobo, an anti-robocall protection app, the Lara Trump robocall, delivered via dozens of different phone numbers, was made 53.8 million times nationwide in September, alone.

The data show that calls were focused on key battleground election states, including Ohio, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Florida. A large number of calls were also made into Texas and Virginia.

Data for the Guilfoyle robocall was not immediately available.

CNN notes that, both robocalls “are littered with misinformation”–adding that experts say there is little difference between absentee ballots and voting-by-mail.

“There is no evidence that voting by mail leads to widespread fraud and abuse,” CNN points out..  “It is also false to suggest that Democrats prefer universal voting-by-mail to absentee ballots.”

Research contact: @CNN

Nike is ‘expecting’ a maternity activewear collection

September 2, 2020

Nike has announced the launch of its first-ever line of maternity activewear as the market for clothing worn during pregnancy—as well as for comfortable work-from-home apparel—grows exponentially during the pandemic, CNN reports.

The collection, called Nike (M), is priced from $45 to $85 and will be available online on September 17. It includes four products, which Nike said are designed to meet the changing needs of women’s bodies before, during and after pregnancy.

Nike (M) includes:

  • A bra that can be adjusted for breastfeeding or pumping;
  • A scoop-neck tank top that makes it comfortable for women to nurse;
  • A tight made with foldable wide waist band that can be folded down or completely pulled up further along in the pregnancy; and
  • A cover-up with a split opening in the front that can be worn in reverse to accommodate a growing belly or serve as a nursing cover.

The clothing utilizes sweat-wicking and recycled material, such as recycled polyester.

“It’s a good time for Nike to be getting into maternity clothing. More people are working out at home during the pandemic,” Marshal Cohen, chief retail industry analyst with NPD Group told CNN during an interview. He added that there is likely to be a “mini-baby boom” between October and next March, thanks to a “stay-at-home lifestyle that started in late March [of this year].”

“Activewear may be everywhere [but] it is not in maternity. So making it available and affordable is a great play,” said Cohen.

Neil Saunders, retail analyst and managing director of GlobalData Retail, agreed, saying that the maternity wear market in the United States has grown at an average of 3.2% per year in terms of sales, even as the birth rate has been relatively stable.

“A lot of this growth has come from women spending more on maternity clothing,” he said. “Demand for stylish and comfortable apparel has become much more important to women over the past five years and this has resulted in them spending a little more on garments.”

Nike says the research and development for Nike (M) began three years ago, and the line was conceived and led by moms and moms-to-be on the Nike design team.

The team used data it collected from more than 150,000 body scans of women around the world to determine how the body grows during pregnancy. It also consulted with 30 female athletes who were either pregnant or post-partum in the design process.

Research contact: @CNN

Trump Administration: No more in-person election security briefings for Congress

September 1, 2020

What they don’t know can’t hurt us:  That’s the assumed motive behind the Trump Administration’s move over the weekend to squelch in-person intelligence briefings provided to the U.S. Congress about the upcoming presidential election.

Until now, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence has been responsible for delivering regular updates to lawmakers on what measures are being taken to protect balloting from foreign or internal tinkering, The New York Times reports.

The nation’s top intelligence officials moved on Saturday to tighten control over the flow of sensitive intelligence about foreign threats to November’s election, telling Congress that they would no longer provide in-person briefings about election security and would rely solely on written updates instead.

Representatives from the Office of the Director of National Intelligence informed the House and Senate Intelligence Committees of the policy change by telephone on Friday and followed up with a batch of letters to congressional leaders on Saturday.

In the letters, the Chief of the Intelligence Office, John L. Ratcliffe, framed the move as an attempt to “ensure clarity and consistency” in intelligence agencies’ interactions with Congress and to crack down on leaks that have infuriated some intelligence officials.

“I believe this approach helps ensure, to the maximum extent possible, that the information O.D.N.I. provides the Congress in support of your oversight responsibilities on elections security, foreign malign influence and election interference is not misunderstood nor politicized,” he wrote, according to a copy obtained by The New York Times. “It will also better protect our sources and methods and most sensitive intelligence from additional unauthorized disclosures or misuse.”

But coming just ten weeks before Election Day, the change drew complaints from lawmakers in both parties, who worried the move would block their ability to question and test intelligence assessments from the executive branch at a time when they are crucial to ensuring that foreign powers do not undermine the results

Intelligence agencies have revealed that Russia is again trying to bolster the campaign of President Donald Trump, who has insisted he is actually “the last person Russia wants to see in office” and consistently attacked the intelligence agencies during his tenure.

Democrats, who fear Trump’s appointees have moved to color intelligence assessments for his political benefit, were particularly furious. The Times said.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Representative Adam Schiff of California, who is the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, called the new policy “shameful” and said intelligence officials had also canceled briefings with committees and the full House on election security threats already scheduled for September at the request of Ratcliffe’s office. They vowed to try to force their reinstatement

“This is a shocking abdication of its lawful responsibility to keep the Congress currently informed, and a betrayal of the public’s right to know how foreign powers are trying to subvert our democracy,” the two senior Democrats wrote.

A spokesperson for the Office of the Director of National Intelligence declined to comment. CNN first reported the change

Research contact: @nytimes

The Happiness Museum in Denmark documents when and why life is good

August 28, 2020

If you have been having a little trouble “finding your happy place” during the last few months, just buy a ticket to Copenhagen and visit the Happiness Museum.

Indeed, many of us would admit that “guilty pleasures” are the closest we have come to true happiness during 2020—a time of global pandemic, cutthroat politics, unemployment, economic turmoil, and social unrest.

Which is why the opening of a new Happiness Museum in (where else?) Denmark feels like the most optimistic story of the year, CNN reports.

The world’s first museum dedicated explicitly to the concept of happiness had a quiet debut on July 14 in a cozy 2,585-square- foot space in Copenhagen’s historic center.It features interactive exhibits and displays exploring what generates happiness.

The new attraction is the brainchild of the Happiness Research Institute, an independent think tank that explores the science behind why some societies are happier than others with the end goal of encouraging global policymakers to include wellbeing as an integral part of the public policy debate.

Meik Wiking, CEO of the Happiness Research Institute, recently told CNN that the idea to open a museum came after years of fielding requests from the public about visits to their drab office space.

“I think people imagine that the institute is like a magical place—a room full of puppies or ice cream,” he said, “but we are just eight people sitting in front of computers looking at data.”

“So we thought, why don’t we create a place where people can experience happiness from different perspectives and give them an exhibition where they can become a little bit wiser around some of the questions we try to solve?”

But, more than six months into the COVID-19 pandemic, Wiking had to decide whether or not to go ahead with the opening. “We thought, there might not be a lot of guests these days, but the world does need a little bit more happiness,” he told CNN.

They set in place strict COVID-19 protocols— including a one-way traffic system and a cap of 50 guests—and opened their doors to the public.

Ever since, the museum has given visitors a tour of global happiness, showing how perceptions of it have changed throughout history, what it looks like in different regions, and why some countries report more of it than others.

Along the way, there are also questionnaires and interactive experiences that aim to give guests “aha” moments, as well as enhance the Institute’s ongoing research.

For example, Wiking says trust toward fellow citizens and political institutions is a major factor in global happiness, which is why some visitors may come across a wallet filled with cash. Museum staff have periodically placed this wallet on the floor for more than a month now, and it’s been returned to reception (with all items inside) every time.

People from around the world also have sent in artifacts of happiness—things that represent joy to them—which have been curated to form a large part of the display. These items are meant to help visitors contextualize what happiness looks like for others in different parts of the globe.

“We might be Danish or Mexican or American or Chinese, but we are first and foremost people,” Wiking says. “It’s the same things that drive happiness no matter where we’re from, and I hope that people will see that in the exhibition.

One guest told him that he had always known he was a happy guy, but he had never before understood the reasons why.

“That, for us, was the best review we could get,” he says.

One of the other main focal points of the museum is why Nordic countries tend to report some of the highest levels of happiness on earth.

Denmark, for example, frequently lands near the top of surveys ranking the world’s happiest nations, including the United Nations’ annual World Happiness Report. In its 2020 list, Denmark comes in at number two,  just behind neighboring Finland, while Copenhagen ranks as the fifth happiest city in the world, behind Helsinki, Aarhus (also in Denmark), Wellington, and Zurich.

Danish psychologist Marie Helweg-Larsen, a professor at Dickinson College in Pennsylvania, says that “it boggles peoples’ minds how you can, just by thinking thoughtfully and strategically about the role of government in life, create happy people.”

Plus, the countries that report the highest levels of happiness tend to contain many elements that, at least on the surface, would seem to hinder it.

“I think foreigners find the Nordic countries to be kind of a conundrum,” Helweg-Larsen explains. “They seem to do things that others have decided couldn’t possibly be associated with happiness, like pay high taxes, live with cold weather and experience long periods of darkness.”

So, what might the rest of the world learn from the Danes in these trying times?

“Trust is a factor in happiness,” Helweg-Larsen says. “We could all do more to talk to people who are not like us and see how we can establish more trust in our own communities.”

She also thinks the Danish concepts of pyt (an “oh well” attitude for accepting a problem and resetting) and hygge (the pursuit of intentional intimacy within interactions and environments) are great for relieving stress.

Wiking tells CNN that, if his studies at the Happiness Research Institute have shown him anything, it’s that humans are incredibly resilient.

“When we follow people over time, we can see that they are remarkable at overcoming the challenges that happen to them,” he says. “Of course, it’s necessary to be optimistic in my profession, but I think we can overcome these times as well.”

Research contact: @CNN

Republicans send North Carolina voters mail-in ballot materials featuring photo of Trump’s face

August 20, 2020

A number of voters in North Carolina  recently received brochures encouraging them to fill out mail-in ballot requests—and the brochures featured a large photograph of President Donald Trump’s face, Salon reports.

“ARE YOU GOING TO LET THE DEMOCRATS SILENCE YOU?” the mailer, sent by North Carolina Trump Victory, the joint field operation of Trump’s re-election team and the Republican National Committee, asks in large block font. “ACT NOW TO STAND WITH PRESIDENT TRUMP.”

The brochure goes on to request “immediate action” to “ensure your right to securely vote Absentee.” Next to a picture of a smiling Trump, the mailer says: “Stand with President Trump. Request your absentee ballot today.”

The president and a number of his Republican allies have routinely pushed the falsehood that voting by mail invites rampant fraud—although Trump, himself, has voted by mail a number of times.

CNN’Ana Cabrera reported last Wednesday, August 12, that the Palm Beach County elections board had delivered Trump and first lady Melania Trump mail-in ballots to Mar-a-Lago (which they had then filled out and returned).

Trump vowed in an on-air interview the next day that he would block crucial U.S. Postal Service (USPS) funding, citing concerns about universal mail-in voting. “They need that money in order to have the Post Office work, so it can take all of these millions of ballots,” he told Fox Business host Maria Bartiromo on Thursday, August 13. “If they don’t get those two items, that means you can’t have universal mail-in voting. Because they’re not equipped.”

On his Twitter account, however, President Trump encouraged the use of mail-in ballots in Florida in a post on August 4, saying, “Whether you call it Vote by Mail or Absentee Voting, in Florida, the election system is Safe and Secure, Tried and True. Florida’s Voting system has been cleaned up (we defeated Democrats attempts at change), so in Florida I encourage all to request a Ballot * Vote by Mail!”

:Chandler Carranza, of Gaston County, North Carolina, told CNN that was the reason he laughed when he received the campaign mailer last Thursday.

“The irony is very thick and definitely not lost on me,” Carranza said. “Trump has been saying mail-in ballots will bring fraud to the election, but absentee ballots are legit. Which is it? It can’t be both ways. I laughed because if the campaign actually took information from other times they have reached out to me, they’d know I won’t vote for Trump despite being a registered Republican.”

Research contact: @Salon

Foxy ladies: A new eye makeup technique is trending—but critics insist it is racist

August 19, 2020

On Instagram, TikTok and YouTube, people from all over the world have been posting videos and photos modeling “the look”—using makeup and other tactics to emulate the lifted, so-called “almond-shaped” or “fox eyes” of celebrities such as Kendall Jenner, Bella Hadid, and Megan Fox.

Fox-eye makeup tutorials show how to use a combination of eye shadow, eyeliner, and fake eyelashes to get a winged aesthetic. Tips include shaving off the tail end of eyebrows and redrawing them to appear straighter and angled upwards. Others have suggested pulling hair back into a high ponytail or using tape to further lift the eyes.

Accentuating eyes to appear slanted, or elongated in shape, creates a more sultry effect, according to some makeup artists creating the look. But to Asian Americans, the “migraine pose” that sometimes accompanies these images— using one or two hands to pull the eyes up by the temples to exaggerate the result -—is far too similar to the action used to demean them in the past, CNN reports.

Indeed, they assert, it’s a form of cultural appropriation.

Kelly H. Chong, a Sociology professor at the University of Kansas, defines cultural appropriation as the adoption, often unacknowledged or inappropriate, of the ideas, practices, customs and cultural identity markers of one group by members of another group whom have greater privilege or power.

“The cultural influencers from the dominant group legitimize it as a cool style ‘trend,’ and in the process exoticize and eroticize it,” Chong added in an e-mail interview with CNN. Even the term “almond eyes,” she says, which is being used to describe the shape of fox eyes, has long been used to describe the shape of Asian eyes.

She points to Hollywood’s uncomfortable past in the appropriating the shape of Asian eyes. In the early 1930s, makeup artist Cecil Holland used techniques — some, similar to creating fox eyes today—to transform White actors into villainous Asian characters, like Fu Manchu. And Mickey Rooney, the White actor playing the part of Holly Golightly’s thickly-accented Japanese neighbor in Breakfast at Tiffany’s cemented “the buck-toothed, slit-eyed Asian man look” in the popular imagination.

TikTok user @LeahMelle, whose video denouncing the fox-eye look went viral, said she couldn’t believe that such a trend could be so popular nowadays: “This wasn’t some dated movie where you could blame the distorted norms of the time period. This was happening now. And it was still viewed as acceptable,” she wrote in an email.

Emma Chamberlain, an influencer with 9.8 million followers on Instagram, was criticized recently for posting a picture that showed her striking this pose while sticking out her tongue.

Her fans rushed to defend her—commenting that those who felt offended were “overreacting.” Chamberlain later deleted the picture and apologized, saying it wasn’t her “intention” to pose in an “insensitive way” and that she was “so sorry to those who were hurt by it.”

But the damage already had been done.

“They mock my eyes, then say ching chong; call me a dog eater and then call me a ch*nk. Like why would you think I’d be fine with Emma’s post?” one person tweeted. “Obviously if she gets to do slant eyes whilst getting praised but it’s my natural eye shape and I’m getting discriminated (of course) I’m mad.”

“It’s a new trend that brings out old stereotypes and old taunts,” Wang said in a phone interview with CNN. “Because it makes people like me feel uncomfortable and (to) some degree annoyed, it’s time to talk about it.”

Like most beauty trends, the craze for fox eyes will eventually subside, and has begun to already since it first came about earlier this year. But that’s exactly the problem, according to Stephanie Hu, founder of Dear Asian Youth, a California-based organization that encourages Asian activism.

In an Instagram post, entitled “The problem with the #FoxEye trend,” the organization wrote, “While it may not have originated from a place of ill-intent, it appropriates our eyes and is ignorant of past racism.”

“It really feels like this is a temporary trend,” Hu told CNN, adding that she believes Asians’ eye shapes aren’t just something to be casually adopted and then “given back” when the trend is over. “Our eyes are something that we have to live with every day,” Hu said in a phone interview.

Research contact: @CNN