Posts tagged with "CNN poll"

Brinksmanship: Unable to cut deal, Nadler soon may subpoena Mueller to testify before U.S. public

June 12, 2019

When and if former Special Counsel Robert Mueller testifies before Congress, his face will be familiar—but the story he tells won’t be, according to findings of a CNN poll fielded in May, which found that fully 75% of Americans have not read the Mueller report on Russian interference into the last presidential election and obstruction of justice by the Trump administration.

Most legislators have failed to read the 448-page document, either.

But that doesn’t include House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler (D-New York)—who  told Democratic leaders at a closed-door meeting this past week that he could issue a subpoena to within two weeks to Mueller, if he is unable to reach an agreement to secure the former special counsel’s public testimony, according to two sources familiar with the meeting, Politico reported.

Nadler’s comments clarified whether the chairman had considered compelling Mueller’s attendance at a public hearing. The committee is still negotiating with Mueller, who, according to Nadler, is thus far only willing to answer lawmakers’ questions in private—a nonstarter for most House Democrats.

The sources cautioned the news outlet that the committee has not settled yet on a timetable for a potential subpoena to Mueller. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-California) hosted the meeting, and four other committee chairs were in attendance.

However, according to Politico’s sources, Nadler told reporters that he was “confident” Mueller will appear before his panel, and that he would issue a subpoena “if we have to.”

“We want him to testify openly. I think the American people need that,” Nadler added. “I think, frankly, it’s his duty to the American people. And we’ll make that happen.”

This week, the committee began to hear testimony related to the report, in an effort to educate the American public.

In addition, Nadler said that, with the threat of a civil contempt citation from the committee hanging over his head, Attorney General William Barr had agreed to release the underlying documents to the report, which had been requested by the House Judiciary Committee back in April.

However, on June 11, word came out that the White House would work with the Department of Justice to decide exactly how much (and what type of) material would be released—leaving the actual evidence that the committee would be permitted to see in question yet again.

Research contact: @politico

CNN poll: 50% of Americans think probe will implicate the president

December 12, 2018

As Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election focuses in on the denizens of the White House, approval of the president’s conduct has dwindled—matching its all-time low in CNN polling, the cable news network reported on December 11.

In the new poll, Trump’s approval rating for handling the Russia investigation has dipped to 29%, matching a low previously hit in June of this year.

The findings, from a poll fielded on behalf of CNN by SSRS, come as half of Americans say they think it is likely that the Mueller investigation will implicate the president in wrongdoing.

The survey was conducted December 6-9—at a time when court filings in cases against Paul Manafort and Michael Cohen revealed the alleged lies that Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman and former personal lawyer, respectively, told either publicly or to the special counsel’s investigators.

President Trump claimed last weekend that the filings by the SCO and the federal court in the Southern District of New York cleared him of any wrongdoing and called for the investigation to end, CNBC reports.

However, the news outlet says, the Cohen filing implicates Trump in the scheme to pay off at least two women who alleged they had had affairs with Trump in order to keep them silent during the campaign; and the Manafort filing suggests the former campaign chair continued to lie about his contacts with the White House this year.

Interestingly enough, Mueller’s approval rating also is down in the poll: 43% approve and 40% disapprove. That compares to a 48% approve to 36% disapprove split in early October. The dip in Mueller’s numbers comes almost entirely among Independents, among whom approval has fallen 10 points to 36%. Among partisans on both sides, Mueller’s approval holds about even with where it was in an October survey: 71% of Democrats approve as do 21% of Republicans.

Trump’s approval rating drop, however, comes among his own partisans as well as among independents. Among Republicans, 51% approve of Trump’s handling of the investigation, a new low by one point, while among independents, 26% approve, also a new low. Just 15% of Democrats approve of the president’s handling of the investigation, up from October but about on par with the level who felt that way earlier this year.

Overall, a majority (54%) continue to say that most of the things Trump has said publicly about the Russia investigation are false, while just over one-third say they are mostly true (36%). That’s largely unchanged since August.

There has also been no meaningful change on whether the investigation itself is a serious matter or mainly an effort to discredit Trump’s presidency: 59% say it’s a serious matter, 35% an effort to discredit Trump.

Half of Americans think it is very or somewhat likely that the Mueller investigation will implicate Trump personally in wrongdoing. That figure is higher among Democrats (78% say it’s likely), but still, nearly a quarter of Republicans think Trump is likely to be personally implicated (23%) as do about half of independents (47%). Aside from partisanship there’s a stark divide here by education among whites, with 58% of whites with college degrees saying they think Trump is likely to be implicated vs. 43% of whites without degrees.

Looking at Michael Cohen’s recent revelation that work continued on a potential project in Russia during the 2016 campaign, 44% believe Trump acted unethically in considering projects in Russia during the campaign, 26% say it was unwise but not unethical, and 23% say there was nothing wrong with Trump’s action.

Trump’s overall approval rating for handling the presidency matches its pre-election level just about exactly, 39% approve and 52% disapprove. Trump’s favorability rating is also steady at 40% favorable to 55% unfavorable.

Research contact: @jennagiesta

Schumer: ‘Mainfestly unfair’ not to share Kavanaugh documents with entire Senate

August 22, 2018

Senate Minority Leader Charles (Chuck) Schumer (D-New York) said on August 20 that he is demanding that documents from SCOTUS nominee Brett Kavanaugh‘s White House tenure under President George W. Bush as Staff Secretary that currently are marked “committee confidential” should be shared with the entire Senate.

“I will … be submitting a request to the chairman and the ranking member of the Judiciary Committee for access for all senators to all of the Kavanaugh documents in the possession of the committee,” Schumer said, according to a report by The Hill on Monday.

He added that “withholding documents from the Senate and the American people under the bogus label of committee confidential is a dark development for the Senate.”

As the legal team for former President George W. Bush hands over documents on Kavanaugh’s work at the White House to the Judiciary Committee, the paperwork is initially marked “committee confidential.” The documents are then reviewed to determine which can be released publicly, The Hill said.

Democrats estimate that roughly 33% of the documents handed over by the Bush legal team to Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) are still marked “committee confidential”—preventing them being released publicly.

“It’s outrageous. Now, Chairman Grassley is usually a fair-minded man. …But when it comes to this area, Chairman Grassley’s actions are manifestly unfair, not typical of his character. I understand the pressure he is under, but that doesn’t forgive the result,” Schumer added.

In a strictly partisan move, Republicans have dismissed the attacks, arguing that Democrats have focused on Kavanaugh’s paperwork because they’ve struggled to find a policy issue that could sink his nomination.

Grassley called out Schumer in a tweet saying any senator was able to stop by the Judiciary Committee to review the documents.

A spokesperson for Grassley also called accepting documents as “committee confidential” an “old hat.”

“Now, as in the past, the committee has agreed to accept material at least initially on a committee confidential basis in order to facilitate timely access and review. Doing so ensures that members of the committee have access to records that presidents may otherwise privilege. This procedure is old hat and the Democrats know it,” the spokesperson added.

According to a CNN poll released on August 16, only 37% of Americans say they’d like to see the Senate vote in favor of his confirmation. Kavanaugh’s support is the lowest in polling dating back to Robert Bork’s nomination by President Ronald Reagan in 1987.

Research contact: @jennagiesta

Senate Intelligence Committee asks WikiLeaks’ Assange to testify

August 9, 2018

WikiLeaks—the organization led by Julian Assange that posted candidate Hillary Clinton’s private emails, as well as emails from the Democratic National Committee (DNC), on its website at several critical junctures during the 2016 presidential campaign—broke news on August 8 that the U.S. Senate Intelligence Committee “has called on editor @JulianAssange to testify.”

In a letter signed by Senators Richard Burr (R-North Carolina) and Senator Mark Warner (D-Virginia), the chairman and vice chairman of the select committee—and delivered by U.S. embassy personnel in London directly to Assange, who remains in hiding to avoid extradition under the U.S. Espionage Act at Ecuador’s embassy—the group asked the WikiLeaks editor to make himself available for a closed-door bipartisan discussion “at a mutually agreeable time and location” to discuss “Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. elections.”

Interestingly enough, WikiLeaks pointed out, eight other legislators, not all of them on the panel, also had “demanded today that @JulianAssange’s asylum be revoked in violation of international law. Remember them.” Those legislators included Senators Robert Menendez (D-New Jersey), Richard Blumenthal (D-Connecticut), Michael Bennet (D-Colorado), Joe Manchin (D-West Virginia), Dianne Feinstein (D-California), Dick Durbin (D-Illinois), Ed Markey (D-Massachusetts), Chris Coons (D-Delaware), and Jeanne Shaheen (D-New Hampshire).

Committee members Kamala Harris (D-California), Martin Heinrich (D,New Mexico), Angus King (I-Maine), Joe Manchin (D-West Virginia) and Ron Wyden (D-Oregon) were rather conspicuously absent from that list; as were all Republicans, save Burr.

In response to the letter, WikiLeaks’ legal team said they are “considering the offer, but testimony must conform to a high ethical standard.”

A CNN poll conducted at the end of June found that most Americans continue to believe that the Russian effort to influence the 2016 presidential election “is a serious matter that should be investigated.”

Research contact: @wikileaks

Trump to Sessions: ‘Stop the rigged witch hunt right now’

August 2, 2018

President Donald Trump is feeling the heat—and it is not environmental. On August 1, he implored Attorney General Jeff Sessions to end the federal investigation into Russia’s interference in the 2016 elections that is being helmed by Special Counsel Robert Mueller.

As usual, the president took to Twitter to make his intentions known. At 9:24 a.m., he tweeted, “This is a terrible situation and Attorney General Jeff Sessions should stop this Rigged Witch Hunt right now, before it continues to stain our country any further. Bob Mueller is totally conflicted, and his 17 Angry Democrats that are doing his dirty work are a disgrace to USA!”

The angry “ask” came after a week in which the POTUS’s probable involvement in a Trump Tower meeting with the Russians in June 2016 grabbed headlines, thanks to a revelation by former Trump lawyer and “fixer” Michael Cohen.

In addition, Trump’s instructions to Sessions were issued on the second day of the Alexandria, Virginia-based federal trial of Paul Manafort, Trump’s former campaign manager. Manafort is accused of bank and tax crimes.

The media quickly characterized his tweet as a form of obstruction of justice. The Washington Post’s Carol Leonnig was prompt to report (also on Twitter) : “NEW: Trump lawyers tell me his tweets this morning are simply “his opinions” and not evidence of an ongoing effort to obstruct the Russia probe. @RudyGiuliani and @JaySekulow call in to explain @realDonaldTrump well-established practice.”

What’s more,  Democratic Congressman Eric Swalwell ( 15th District, California) rapidly tweeted, “Just as a reminder, @realDonaldTrumps tweets are official statements. [Press Secretary] Sarah Sanders might try to spin it now into “opinion,” but Trump is telling his subordinate Jeff Sessions what he wants him to do: stop Mueller’s investigation.”

And progressive organization, MoveOn, commented, “If @real DonaldTrump sabotages #Mueller‘s #TrumpRussia investigation we will need to take swift action. Text ALERT to 668366 & head here: …http://www.trumpisnotabovethelaw.org” 

Presidents typically do not weigh in on ongoing Justice Department investigations, The New York Times said, “but … Trump has been outspoken about his anger and frustration with the Russia investigation, which predates his presidency and was later taken over by …. Mueller.…. Trump has also said that he never would have made … Sessions his attorney general if he knew … Sessions would recuse himself from the Russia inquiry.”

The special counsel is also looking into some of Trump’s tweets about. Sessions and the former FBI Director James Comey —and whether the messages were intended to obstruct justice, the Time said.

A CNN poll conducted by SSRS posted on June 22 found that most Americans continue to believe that the Russian effort to influence the 2016 presidential election is a serious matter that should be investigated, but the constant criticism by President Donald Trump of special counsel Robert Mueller is taking its toll. The number of Americans who approve of how Mueller is handling the investigation has dropped from 48% in March to 44% in May to just 41% [in June], the lowest it has been in CNN’s polling.

Mueller has a lot of company; no one connected with this matter is coming out of it in a positive light. According to CNN, his favorable rating is just 32%; former FBI Director James Comey’s favorability is just 28%; Rudy Giuliani, one of Trump’s lawyers in the Russia investigation, is viewed favorably by only 31% of Americans.

Research contact: @CNNPolitics

Mike Bloomberg proffers $80M to help Dems win midterms

June 22, 2018

Media mogul and former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg—who ran and won three times on a Republican ticket in the largely democratic Big Apple, although he is an Independent—has approved a plan to spend at least $80 million of his personal fortune, estimated to be over $50 billion, on the upcoming midterm elections. His goal, as was first reported by The New York Times on June 20, is to help Democrats wrest control of the House from the GOP.

According to the Times, “By siding so emphatically with one party, … Bloomberg has the potential to upend the financial dynamics of the midterm campaign, which have appeared to favor Republicans up to this point.”

In a formal statement on his own website, Bloomberg noted, “Republicans in Congress have had almost two years to prove they could govern responsibly. They failed. As we approach the 2018 midterms, it’s critical that we elect people who will lead in ways that this Congress won’t— both by seeking to legislate in a bipartisan way, and by upholding the checks and balances that the Founding Fathers set up to safeguard ethics, prevent the abuse of power, and preserve the rule of law.

“And so this fall, I’m going to support Democrats in their efforts to win control of the House”

He also remarked, “I’ve never thought that the public is well-served when one party is entirely out of power, and I think the past year and half has been evidence of that .…[Republicans] have done little to reach across the aisle to craft bipartisan solutions ― not only on guns and climate change, but also on jobs, immigration, health care, and infrastructure. As a result, Congress has accomplished very little.”

The Democrats need 23 seats in November to regain a majority in the House. Support for Democratic House candidates has ticked up slightly to 50%, according to a CNN poll conducted by SSRS and released on June 20.

Research contact: @MikeBloomberg

Democrats gain strength for 2018 midterms

December 29, 2017

Democrats have a distinct advantage over Republicans in a hypothetical Congressional 2018 midterm matchup, based on findings of a CNN poll conducted by SSRS and released on December 20. .

Concurrently, the news network says, enthusiasm about voting next year is increasing among Democrats nationwide following an unexpected win in Alabama’s Senate special election last month and a strong showing in Virginia’s state government elections.

Among registered voters nationwide, 56% say they favor a Democrat in their congressional district, while 38% prefer a Republican. That 18-point edge represents the largest advantage that Democrats have held, according to CNN polling on the 2018 contests—and the largest at this point in midterm election cycles dating back two decades.

The CNN finding follows several other public polls showing large double-digit leads for Democrats on similar questions.

What’s more, Independent voters favor Democrats by a 16-point margin, 51% to 35%—similar to the 50% to 36% margin by which they favored Democrats in fall of 2005, before the party recaptured the House and Senate in 2006.

The Democrats hold a larger lead overall now because Republicans make up a smaller share of the electorate than they did in 2005, according to a Gallup Poll finding earlier this month. Indeed, only 38% of Americans now self-identified as Republican or Republican-leaning Independents during 2017, based on an average of monthly numbers from Gallup.

And those Republicans who are still in the electorate are less enthusiastic about voting next year than are the Democrats. Overall, 49% of registered voters who self-identify as Democratic or Democratic-leaning Independents say they are extremely or very enthusiastic about voting for Congress next year, compared with 32% of Republicans and Republican-leaning Independent voters who say the same.

The GOP may be further disadvantaged by a public displeased and angry with the way the country is being governed under their control. Overall, 68% say they are dissatisfied with the way the nation is being governed, and a matching 68% say they are angry about the way things are going in the country today. Among Democrats, satisfaction has fallen from 40% to 6%. Anger, too, has switched sides, with half of Democrats now saying they are “very angry” about the way things are going, up from 14% in 2015. Among Republicans, deep anger has dipped from 41% in 2015 to 10% now.

The CNN Poll was conducted by SSRS between December 14 and December 17 among a random national sample of 1,001 adults reached on landlines or cellphones by a live interviewer.

Research contact: jennifer.agiesta@cnn.com