Posts tagged with "Clothing"

Dia serves the 70% of U.S. women whom the fashion industry ignores

November 21, 2018

Nearly 70% of American women—about 100 million coast-to-coast—wear a size 14 or larger, according to market research firm Houston-based Plunkett Research. But what are they wearing? Only 18% of the clothing sold in 2016 was considered plus-size, Port Washington, New York, market research firm NPD found in a recent study covered by the cable network CNBC.

On a personal level, that’s something that Nadia Boujarwah, CEO and co-founder of New York City-based Dia&Co, has realized for a long time. The former Wall Street executive says on her company’s website, “I’ve always loved fashion, but struggled to find clothes that fit my body and worked with my personal style. I’ve been everything from a size 12 to a size 22 and I couldn’t help but notice, no matter my size, that there was nothing for me.”

Indeed, she told CNBC in a recent interview, since the retail industry isn’t catering to this majority, “the average plus-sized woman is only spending 20 cents on the dollar that women in smaller sizes are spending on apparel.”

“So instead,” Boujarwah says, “I co-founded Dia&Co in 2014 [along with Lydia Gilbert], as a way for women just like me to embrace their individuality. It grew out of a personal need and now, Dia&Co is a place where everyone can explore all the incredible things that style can really do.”

The company offers clients personal styling exclusively in sizes 14 and up, as well as monthly boxes of curated plus-size clothing. A spokesperson for the company said the styling service has had more than 1 million users and ships to all 50 U.S. states.

Like the popular online retailers, Stitch Fix and Trunk Club, Dia&Co asks prospective customers to complete a profile, and then a stylist curates the items that are shipped to her. Dia charges a $20 styling fee, and the customer pays for the clothes she wants to keep.

Boujarwah told CNBC that her company is not only helping the customer find clothes, but it’s helping create clothes as well. “We do everything from work with brands to enter plus for the first time,” she said. “We build our own brands, all the way down through really creating the content and the community, to inspire her to participate.”

She added: “If you think about how many problems that are inherent” among plus-sized women, Boujarwah explained, Dia has taken “a very comprehensive view, and we’ve really said every part of this challenge for her is our job.”

Research contact: @erincstefanski

Made to order: Why we personalize our purchases

June 15, 2018

Do you like using products that have a personal touch, in terms of color, design, initials, or even taste? Just three years ago, only 17% of U.S. consumers ever had purchased a personalized sneaker, technology product, meal, vacation, or household appliance. However, YouGov reports that, the so-called “personalization economy” has experienced a major increase in demand. Today, at least one in four Americans (26%) say that they have added a personal touch to a product, either for themselves or someone else.

Why personalize? According to the researchers, there are five major reasons why consumers take this approach—among them:

  1. To design a product to meet a specific need (types of materials, shape, size, duration);
  2. To identify a product as “belonging to me;”
  3. To design something just for fun;
  4. To feel pride in creating/designing something;
  5. To demonstrate creativity; or
  6. To stand out from other people.

Among those who create their own unique products, sneakers (29%) and other forms of apparel are tops for personalization, tied by food and beverages (29%); and followed by technology products (27%), vacation and travel experiences (25%), and household goods (22%).

What’s more, personalizers can be identified by their age and personality traits. They are generally younger (40% Millennials), highly educated (30%), and have disposable income to spend (31%). Indeed, nearly half of this group (46%) say that they would be willing to pay more for an individualized product; which enables brands to market to them at a premium.

In addition, most personalizers could be described as social, outgoing, and optimistic, according to YouGov.

Data on the online behaviors of this particular consumer segment is rich, YouGov says. It demonstrates that personalizers aren’t simply tech-savvy—they strive to be early adopters of technology. That may explain why they’re more likely to be a part of the ever-growing live streaming audience. Live streaming may not be new, but fueled by social platforms like Instagram, Snapchat, Periscope, and Twitch, the format has been reinvigorated by a surge of mobile users. Personalizers tend to use their smartphones (38%) most of all of their devices and a majority (62%) say they watch live streams.

Given that personalizers tend to be social and that the heart of a live streaming channel is its community, the two seem to go hand-in-hand. It’s also an interactive platform that allows brands to get immediate, real-time data about their viewers.

What’s more, compared to people who have never done so, personalizers are more likely to go to movie theaters, listen to online radio, or play games on a console. A multi-platform approach may prove the best way to stay connected with these digital natives.

Finally, the researchers believe, the personalization economy will continue to grow and shape what consumers expect from products and services. Whether a brand already offers personalization or is still testing the waters, looking to what makes the consumer tick is the key.

From an opportunity perspective, they say, brands can get closer to their customers by using personalization as a transformative tool—one that turns a product into a shared experience using a brand’s resources and consumer’s sense of identity.

Research contact: ted.marzilli@yougov.com