Posts tagged with "Clorox"

Coming clean: Americans actually ‘like’ this household chore

April 18, 2019

When it comes to tackling household chores, most people can identify a favorite task (or at least one they can tolerate), as well as a job that they would happily relinquish, according to findings of a survey of more than 1,000 Americans conducted by Clorox.

While favoring any chore feels like a stretch, some chores (such as vacuuming) certainly beat others (e.g., mopping), in terms of the amount of time and labor required to get them done.

Asked about their favorite task, more than one-third of respondents (37%) said they preferred doing the laundry, according to a report by Real Simple magazine.

The study—named “The Dirt on Spring Cleaning: American’s Top Cleaning Confessions”—also found that many homeowners were partial to cleaning the kitchen (chosen by 32%). And their least-favorite task? Organizing and dusting bedrooms, which is highly rated by only 11% of the survey cohort.

Clorox’s new survey shared a slew of other juicy cleaning facts: Most people are either Clean Freaks or Scramblers when it comes to tidying up, though Emotional Cleaners also are relatively common.

Fully 31% of respondents admitted that they never deep-clean their homes—or do it rarely—and 27% said that their microwave is splattered with unknown food.

Amusingly enough, a whopping 78% concede that they hide clutter or messes, mostly in a bedroom or closet, when cleaning in a rush.

The survey reveals that 93% of U.S. homeowners. are bothered by mess and dirt: Almost nobody likes living in a cluttered or dirty home. But how everyone tackles that mess can reveal a lot about different personalities and preferences—and maybe the key to a harmonious household is finding someone who will tackle the chores you like the least, and vice versa. Who knew cleaning could be so romantic?

Research contact: @Clorox

Consumer wallets ‘spring a leak’ as prices soar on diapers, kitty litter, and toilet paper

February 12, 2019

Most of us cut back on everything but the essentials when household prices go up, but our budget remains the same. However, according to a February 10 report by The Wall Street Journal, the cost of staples—including such fundamentals as diapers and cat litter—is expected to increase in 2019, leaving us little choice but to ante up.

Producers of household products, from toilet paper to bleach, are set to raise prices again this year after already hiking prices in 2018, hoping to offset higher commodity costs and boost profits, the financial news outlet says.

New Jersey-based Church & Dwight already has increased prices for about one-third of its products, including Arm & Hammer cat litter and baking soda, and some OxiClean cleaning products.

“The good news is that competitors are raising [prices] in those categories as we speak,” Church & Dwight CEO Matthew Farrell said on a conference call last week, during which the company reported higher quarterly sales and lower profits.

What he left out of that statement to financial analysts was that it was good news for the company and its stockholders—but not for America’s consumers.

The company is now discussing more price increases with retailers, including for personal-care products, Farrell told analysts Tuesday. Those brands include Nair, Arm & Hammer Toothpaste, Orajel, Simply Saline, Waterpik, and Viviscal, among others.

Other household names that are planning to release similarly “good” news, according to the Journal, include Procter & GambleColgate-Palmolive, and Clorox, which are raising prices in response to higher costs of raw materials and transportation, as well as unfavorable foreign-currency swings.

For much of the past decade, the Journal notes, price cuts have been far more common than price increases as U.S. companies were mostly reluctant to test consumers’ spending power and brand loyalty in a fragile economic recovery.

When companies tried to raise prices, “they better have had a uniquely strong innovation or be willing to lose market share to competitors,” Sanford C. Bernstein analyst Ali Dibadj told the news outlet.

Adding to the challenge of raising prices is that more shoppers have been switching to store-branded paper towels and discount detergents, or opting for online upstarts such as Dollar Shave Club.

Traditional brands also have been under pressure from big-box retailers such as Costco and discounters like Walmart Inc. and Amazon to keep prices low—pushing the manufacturers to focus on lowering costs in their supply chains or pare back advertising.

Finally, after failing to see success when they tried to combat weak demand by lowering prices, the industry’s biggest player, P&G, shifted its course last summer, announcing it would charge more for several of its brands—and several rivals followed suit, the Journal reports.

The recent price increases are largely playing out in the companies’ favor, Wells Fargo Securities analyst Bonnie Herzog told the Journal. Sales volumes of household and personal products in the United States. declined 1.4% in January, according to Bernstein’s analysis of data from Nielsen. Dollar sales of those products rose 0.7% in the period, Bernstein said, indicating that the price increases, on balance, are padding the bottom lines at consumer-goods companies.

How consumers will deal with the price hikes long-term remains to be seen.

Research contact: aisha.al-muslim@wsj.com

Cleaning can make your child a kinder person

March 21, 2018

Clean home, warm heart: A person’s level of empathy is positively associated with living in a clean household—especially if he or she is responsible for some aspect of the scrubbing, scouring, or tidying up. Those are the findings of a poll of more than 2,000 adults nationwide conducted in February by Clorox

Not only does a clean environment enhance a person’s level of compassion, but it also is linked to “ a drastic increase in connections and willingness to help others in the communit[y],” Clorox researchers report.

What’s more, parents say that their kids are more productive and better-behaved in clean spaces. Indeed, fully 59% of parents report that their children study better in a clean room; and 49% believe that their offspring are more pleasant to live with, if their rooms are clean.

Specifically, the Oakland, California-based bleach manufacturer claims that kids who are given cleaning chores at home learn critical life skills. Indeed, the recent poll found that, when a person has performed cleaning chores growing up, the likelihood that he or she will exhibit higher empathy as an adult increases by 64% —and the chances are 60% greater that he or she will help others in the community.

“There’s nothing more important to me as a dad than making sure my kids grow up to be kind and resilient adults and I think that’s something that connects all parents,” said Sterling K. Brown, who plays Randall Pearson on the NBC-TV show This Is Us, and is, himself, the father of two children.

Of the Clorox campaign, Brown says, “It’s amazing that something as simple as cleaning can be such an essential tool in teaching my kids life lessons, like the importance of caring for others and being connected to the community around them.”

Beyond connecting us to the people and communities around us, the research findings show that simply being in a clean space impacts us in other key ways. In a clean space, the majority of people say they are:

  • More relaxed (80%),
  • Less stressed (60%), and
  • More productive (72%).

What’s more, Clorox claims, the more people clean, the happier they are. The likelihood someone is happier than average increases by 53% for every additional hour that they clean in a week.

“At Clorox we believe that cleaning matters. Through this campaign, we hope to show people that clean isn’t the opposite of dirty—it is the start of new possibilities,” said Clorox Director of Marketing Shaunte  Mears Watkins. “Cleaning is a way to show our family, friends and loved ones that we care by creating an environment where they can succeed.”

Research contact: rita.gorenberg@clorox.com