Posts tagged with "chick-fil-A"

Chick-fil-A denies that its charitable donations support an anti-LGBTQ agenda

March 25, 2019

Seven years after Chick-fil-A CEO Dan Cathy first publicly voiced support for “the biblical definition of the family unit”—and national gay rights groups vowed to boycott the fast food chain—the Georgia-based private company is again on the defensive against claims that it has a discriminatory agenda.

This time, according to a March 20 report by CBS News, critics are saying that Chick-fil-A’s anti-gay-rights position is being reflected in its charitable donations.

The company’s conservative Christian leanings are back in glaring view—with newly released tax filings first publicized by ThinkProgress. The left-leaning news site found that, in 2017, the Chick-fil-A Foundation gave $1.8 million to three tax-exempt groups with a history of anti-LGBTQ discrimination.

The donations include payments of $1.6 million to the Fellowship of Christian Athletes, a ministry that spreads an anti-LGBTQ message to college athletes; $150,000 to the Salvation Army, which has opposed LGBTQ rights; and $6,000 to the Paul Anderson Youth Home, a Christian residential facility for troubled youth that teaches that homosexuality is wrong.

Chick-fil-A also listed the donations on its website, which noted that the company’s foundation as of June 2017 “no longer supports” the Paul Anderson Youth Home.

Chick-fil-A, which has previously denied that it discriminates against any group, reiterated that stand. “To suggest our giving was done to support a political or non-inclusive agenda is inaccurate and misleading,” the company stated in an email to CBS MoneyWatch.  

The private company’s conservative Christian leanings also drew attention last year when then-EPA head Scott Pruitt explained why he had looked into having his wife own a Chick-fil-A franchise. “I love, she loves, we love Chick-fil-A as a franchise of faith,” Pruitt told a reporter.

Research contact: @CBSNews

Hen parties: Chick-fil-A tests catering and home deliveries

November 6, 2018

With a growing demand for food to-go, Chick-fil-A—the home of the Original Chicken Sandwich with two pickles on a toasted, buttered bun—is testing a new restaurant prototype. New locations that opened in Nashville and Louisville last month have no dining rooms; and, instead, focus on catering and delivery.

Customers in both cities now are able to place orders at any of the local Chick-fil-A restaurants, but the new locations will serve as hubs for catering and delivery.

One of the things that makes the Nashville hub so unique is the lack of a dining room or drive-thru. Roughly 4,200 square-feet of the restaurant’s 5,800 square-feet will be dedicated to kitchen space. That’s more than two times the size of a normal Chick-fil-A kitchen.

Using the regular Chick-fil-a menu, customers can place a single order for one sandwich and fries either by walking up to the front counter inside the restaurant, or through the DoorDash delivery service. They also can order catering to be delivered or picked up at the restaurant.

There’s just one catch: no cash. The new location will only accept credit/debit, making the Chick-fil-A Mobile App the easiest way to order.

Along with the new location in Nashville, a similar format will be built in Louisville. At 4,800 square feet in size, the new Chick-fil-A Louisville Catering and Delivery location also has no dining room or walk-up ordering; and is focusing solely on preparing catering and delivery orders for Chick-fil-A restaurants in the city’s East End.

“This is a tremendous opportunity to create a better experience for restaurant Team Members and customers alike,” said Bruce Smith, Operator of the new location. “Team Members can stay focused on making sure every customer has the best possible experience at our restaurants. It’s never been easier for customers who are picking up their catering orders.”

According to Thrillist, Chick-fil-A just keeps getting bigger. It’s on track to become the third-largest fast-food chain in America and for the third year in a row, it’s bheen named the nation’s favorite fast-food joint.

Research contact: @ChickfilANews

Reputation poll: Apple needs polishing

March 14, 2018

The Apple and Google corporate brands have lost their elan—while Elon Musk’s Tesla is rocketing higher after launching a red Roadster into deep space and Amazon continues to ride high at number one in the Harris Poll Reputation Quotient for the third consecutive year.

Since 1999, the Reputation Quotient has quantified the reputation ratings for the 100 most visible U.S. companies, according to Harris.

Specifically, in a survey of about 26,000 U.S. adults, iPhone manufacturer Apple dropped to number 29 this year from its previous position at number five, and Google dropped from number eight to number 28. Apple had ranked at number two as recently as 2016.

John Gerzema, CEO of the Harris Poll, told Reuters in an interview that the likely reason Apple and Google plummeted was that they have not introduced as many attention-grabbing products as they did in past years, such as when Google rolled out Google Maps or Apple’s then-CEO Steve Jobs introduced the iPod, iPhone and iPad.

“Google and Apple, at this moment, are sort of in valleys,” Gerzema said. “We’re not quite to self-driving cars yet. We’re not yet seeing all the things in artificial intelligence they’re going to do.”

Meanwhile, Gerzema attributed Amazon’s continued high ranking to its expanding footprint in consumers’ lives, into areas such as groceries via its Whole Foods acquisition.

Elon Musk’s Tesla climbed from number nine to number three on the strength of sending its Roadster into space aboard a SpaceX booster—despite fleeting success delivering cars on time on Earth, Gerzema told Reuters.

He’s a modern-day carnival barker—it’s incredible,” Gerzema said of Musk. He noted that the Tesla CEO “is able to capture the public’s imagination when every news headline is incredibly negative. They’re filling a void of optimism.”

This year’s top ten rankings go as follows: Amazon, Wegman’s Food Markets, Tesla Motors, Chick-fil-A, Walt Disney, HEB Grocery, United Parcel Service, Publix Super Markets, Patagonia, and Aldi.

Last place went to Japanese auto parts supplier Takata, which distributed air bags that inflated with too much force—allegedly causing 22 deaths and hundreds of injuries, and prompting the largest recall in automotive history.

Research contact: @StephenNellis