Posts tagged with "CBS This Morning"

What would Oprah do? Winfrey and BFF Gayle King give off-the-cuff advice in new video series

January 10, 2019

Oprah Winfrey only may rank as number two on the Gallup Poll’s Most Admired Woman list for 2018, after the respected and relate-able former First Lady Michelle Obama—but combine her with her “bestie” of 40 years Gayle King (who also is a household name, as co-anchor of CBS This Morning) and they are almost unbeatable.

Indeed, when you combine their life experience with their talk-show smarts, who would you rather ask for advice?

Now, in a new OprahMag.com video series, called the OG Chronicles, , the dynamic duo will respond to questions from readers, offering their time-tested advice—and revealing fun tidbits about themselves in the process. January’s topic: Dating, because who wouldn’t want relationship advice from these two?

Winfrey and King, both 64, discuss relationships, get real about sharing passcodes with significant others, and debate whether you should sleep with someone on the first date.

“We cannot promise any miracles—there are none—but we can promise some opinions,” Winfrey says in a six-minute promotional clip.

According to a report by MSN, When the friends answer a fan’s question about how to spice up a long-term relationship, Oprah admits that she has tried “the whole negligee thing” with disappointing results.

“I’m standing on the stairs when [Stedman Graham, her partner] walks in and he literally comes in [and] walks right past me and goes, ‘What are you doing?’” Winfrey says of her failed attempt at seduction.

King added her own story, explaining she had tried to seduce former husband William Bumpus. “I got one better. [I] wrapped myself up in saran wrap when I was married, put on the trench coat and when he walked in, I went, ‘Ta-da!’” she said while mimicking opening her coat. “He went, ‘What is that?’ So that’s not good for your ego.”

Winfrey shared that she’d discovered what works for her—baking. “For me, I gotta say making cornbread kinda serves the purpose,” she said, laughing. “I made some cornbread yesterday and you would have thought I stripped myself naked. Like, a little cornbread and black-eyed peas goes a long way in my house!”

When it comes to sleeping with someone on the first date, both friends adamantly said, “No!”

The new show launched on OprahMag.com on January 9.

Research contact: #theOGChronicles

Your ‘wildest’ dreams could offer an early clue to Parkinson’s disease

October 2, 2018

In July, 82-year-old actor Alan Alda revealed that he has Parkinson’s disease—a progressive nervous system disorder that affects movement—and in an interview with CBS This Morning, he revealed that an unusual dream helped lead him to his diagnosis. 

Alda, best-known for his portrayal of Army Captain “Hawkeye” Pierce in the TV series M*A*S*H (1972-1983), said he asked his doctor to test him for the disease after reading an article about how physically acting out your dreams can be one of the earliest precursors of the neurological disorder.

“I asked for a scan because I thought I might have it,” Alda said. “I read an article by Jane Brody in The New York Times that indicated that if you have — if you act out your dreams, there’s a good chance that might be a very early symptom, where nothing else shows,” Alda told CBS News.He recognized that what the story described had happened to him.

“By acting out your dreams, I mean I was having a dream where someone was attacking me and I threw a sack of potatoes at them, and what I was really doing was throwing a pillow at my wife,” Alda explained.

At that point, he had no other sign of illness. “The doctor said, ‘Why do you want a scan? You don’t have any symptoms,'” Alda recalled. “And I said, I want to know if there’s anything I can do—I want to do it.”

About 60,000 Americans are diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease each year, and this number does not reflect the thousands of cases that go undetected. An estimated 7 million to 10 million people worldwide—and about 1 million in the United States—are living with Parkinson’s disease, according to the Parkinson Association of the Carolinas..

Catching the disease in its early stages can be beneficial for a number of reasons, Dr. Claire Henchcliffe, director of the Parkinson’s Disease & Movement Disorders Institute at Weill Cornell Medicine and New York-Presbyterian told the network news outlet.

“There are modifiable lifestyle factors that could make a difference, for example exercising and diet. While these are not proven to delay onset of Parkinson’s there is considerable optimism about their role,” she told CBS News. “Making the diagnosis also means that if a person wants to get involved in clinical studies then they can make a real contribution to developing better understanding of and treatments for Parkinson’s.”

Henchcliffe notes that it’s been well documented that sleep disturbances, including having problems falling asleep or staying asleep, and restless legs syndrome, are common in people with Parkinson’s. Over the years there’s been some debate over whether sleep trouble is a complication of Parkinson’s or a precursor of the disease — an early warning sign that surfaces well  before other symptoms set it.

“What’s really turned out to be a critical link is the recognition that certain specific sleep disorders [such as REM sleep behavior disorder, or RBD], not only affect people with Parkinson’s but in fact show up in some cases many years earlier than the movement symptoms that lead to diagnosis,” Henchcliffe said. “So while for some types of sleep disturbances we might still debate whether they are precursors or complications, for RBD there is now extremely strong evidence that it can be a harbinger of Parkinson’s disease that will manifest some years down the line.”

Carlos L. Rodriguez, MD, a sleep medicine doctor at Cleveland Clinic Sleep Disorders Center, told CBS News that he saw a patient with RBD several years ago who was dreaming that he was playing high school football again in the defensive end position. “He had a clear avenue of attack straight to the quarterback and was rushing aggressively to tackle him when he awoke to find that his head had rammed through the drywall of his room,” Rodriguez told CBS News.

Rodriguez explains that RBD is usually caused by neurodegeneration within the brainstem, which disables the mechanisms responsible for immobilizing muscles during REM sleep—the cycle of of sleep in which we dream. This is what enables someone to literally act out what’s happening in their dreams.

The sleep disorder has been connected to other neurodegenerative diseases, including multiple system atrophy, and dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease and Lewy body disease. In one small study of 26 patients with RBD, fully 80% went on to develop Parkinson’s or another one of these diseases.

Henchcliffe emphasizes that not everyone with RBD is destined to develop Parkinson’s.

“But I do think that acting out dreams in RBD warrants a visit to a doctor to figure out what the cause may be,” she said. ”

Alda told CBS This Morning that one of the reasons he decided to speak out about his medical condition was to send a message of hope to others who might be facing the disease. The actor is still extremely active, taking boxing lessons three times a week, and he recently launched a podcast called Clear+Vivid that explores all the ways people communicate with each other.

“In the very beginning, to be immobilized by fear and think the worst thing has happened to you — it hasn’t happened to you. You still have things you can do,” he said.

Research contact: @Ashley_LizWelch

Will Oprah hit the presidential trail?

January 11, 2018

President Donald Trump told reporters on January 9 that he not only knows movie star and TV tycoon Oprah Winfrey, but he likes her. Were she to be nominated for president on the Democratic ticket in 2020, the POTUS said, “Yeah, I’ll beat Oprah. Oprah will be lots of fun. I don’t think she’s going to run.”

However, following Oprah’s acceptance speech for the Cecille B. DeMille award at the Golden Globes in Beverly Hills on January 7, rumors were rife that she might just put her hat in the ring.

And none of those close to her disavowed the idea. Even best friend and CBS This Morning Co-host Gayle King said that Oprah was “very intrigued by the idea.” Longtime romantic partner Stedman Graham also commented that Oprah “would absolutely” run for president if she were the people’s choice.

Now, a poll conducted by Rasmussen Reports and released on January 10 finds that, if Oprah were to make a White House run against Trump, she would be the likely winner.

The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 48% of likely U.S. Voters would opt for Winfrey, while 38% would choose Trump. But a sizable 14% are undecided.

Winfrey has the support of 76% of Democrats, 22% of Republicans and 44% of voters not affiliated with either major political party. The president earns 66% of the vote from Republicans, 12% of Democrats and 38% of those who are unaffiliated.

Twelve percent (12%) of both Republicans and Democrats are undecided given this matchup. One-in-five unaffiliated voters (19%) aren’t sure which candidate they would support.

Fifty-five percent (55%) of all voters view Winfrey favorably, including 27% with a “very favorable” view of the media personality and entrepreneur. That’s little changed from 2011, Nielsen said—after Winfrey announced she was ending her TV talk show after 25 years on the air. Thirty-four percent (34%) admitted to an unfavorable view of her, with 18% who have a “very unfavorable” opinion of the star.

The survey of 1,000 U.S. voters was conducted by Pulse Opinion Research on behalf of Rasmussen..

Research contact: info@rasmussenreports.com