Posts tagged with "Bustle"

Stretch goals: Lululemon is finally extending its size range

September 15, 2020

A larger Lululemon size offering is finally here. The Vancouver, Canada-based activewear brand announced on September 8 at a press conference helmed by CEO Calvin McDonald that it will offer sizes up to 20 for its core styles by the end of September.

The company currently only goes up to a size 14 for most pieces—and its body-hugging athletic gear is shown on the Lululemon website on models with thin frames.

Indeed, Lululemon has been called out on multiple occasions in the past for body-shaming, according to a report by Bustle. In 2013, former CEO Chip Wilson resigned after stating that Lululemon pants “don’t work for some women’s bodies.” Then, in 2017, a woman’s story went viral after she was allegedly told that she should be shopping for a larger size when visiting the Lululemon store in Canada.

Despite these incidents, the brand continues to enjoy unprecedented popularity in the activewear market, Bustle notes. Several items — including Meghan Markle’s go-to Align leggings—continue to sell out.

What’s more. those who are quarantining and working from home during a time of pandemic are choosing to wear comfortable, soft clothing. Thus, the brand was one of the few that saw a significant sales increase during the first half of the year.

While the brand will offer larger sizes for its core pieces by the end of the month; McDonald promised that the “majority of women’s products” will be more size-inclusive by the end of 2021. He added that it is “an important step forward” for the company.

Research contact: @bustle

Give it a shot: Why you need to get the flu shot during the pandemic

September 14, 2020

Even if you usually would be as likely to get a flu shot as to get shot out of a cannon, 2020has become the year for you to step up, grit your teeth, put on your favorite face mask, and get vaccinated, Bustle medical expert Dr. Julia Blank, a board-certified family physican in Pacific Palisades, California, tells us. :

Never done it before? Make this year a first, Dr. Blank advises.

Why? Because the 2020-21 flu shot is expected to be effective at keeping people from getting the flu—and is our best bet, if we want to keep our healthcare system from being overwhelmed by flu and COVID-19 patients at once.

“It’s important to get the flu vaccine this year for several reasons,” Dr. Blank recently said during an interview with Bustle.. For one, she says, immunity from the previous vaccine wanes in about six months, so it won’t protect you from year to year.

“It’s important to boost your body’s production of antibodies each flu season,” she says. On top of that, the flu itself evolves season to season; last year’s vaccine won’t protect you as well against this year’s strain. “The flu vaccine is updated each flu season to better match the surveillance data about which strains of flu virus are currently circulating and predicted to circulate during the coming season,” Dr. Blank says.

In the winter of 2018-19, around 490,600 people in the U.S. had to be hospitalized for flu, according to the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. As of September 8, over 380,000 people had been hospitalized for COVID-19 in the United States, according to the COVID Tracking Project. 

“If we see a large rise in serious flu and COVID cases at the same time, this fall and winter, our health system may become overwhelmed, and this in turn may lead to greater morbidity and mortality,” Dr. Blank says. Getting vaccinated is also useful for diagnostic purposes. If you’ve had the flu vaccine and then later wake up with a fever and a cough, your doctor can send you off for a COVID-19 test quick smart.

The most common flu vaccine is quadrivalent, Bustle reports—meaning that it targets four separate strains of flu. Each quadrivalent vaccine protects against two A-types of flu and two B-types. A-types are found in both humans and animals, while B-types affect only humans.

Dr. Blank says three of those vaccines have been updated for the 2020 flu season, based on what strains have developed over the past 12 months. (If you’re allergic to egg, you’ll get a slightly different type of flu shot, but your doctor will talk you through what that means for your immunity.) 

Five centers for flu surveillance around the world—in London, Beijing, Atlanta, Melbourne, and Tokyo—coordinate twice a year to pool their research on emerging flu strains in order to develop the vaccine for the following season. They coordinate flu shots for both hemispheres, based on the strains that are popping up.

How effective the 2020 flu shot is likely won’t be known until later in the season, once it’s had time to do its thing. A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study in 2019 found that the vaccine that year was 39% effective for all age groups, and 42% effective for people over 50. The European Center for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that vaccines for the most common A-type and B-type flus are between 30 and 60% effective every year on average.

Getting the flu shot isn’t a 100% guarantee that you won’t get the flu. It only targets the most common varieties, and if a less-common strain starts circulating, you’re not protected against it. But even if you do get the flu after getting the vaccine, research shows that it reduces the likelihood of severe symptoms by 40 to 60%, making it a good investment for your health.

Research contact: @bustle

The meaning behind the #FilterDrop campaign you’re seeing on Instagram

September 9, 2020

While “authenticity” is highly valued these days, you wouldn’t know it by looking at social media: Just as many women wouldn’t leave the house without some form of makeup, many Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter users wouldn’t post a selfie without a filter.

In the age of image-altering apps like Facetune and seemingly flawless influencers, many would likely admit to being filter-dependent. In fact, according to a survey results posted by Bustle, fully one-third (33%) of girls and young women will not post selfies online without using a filter. 

The findings, published by the UK-based charity Girlguiding, highlighted that two out of five of the young women (40%) surveyed “feel upset” that they can’t look like the way they do online.

Between influencer culture and social media ads and posts, more than half of the girls said they have seen ads that have made them “feel pressured to look different”—and this figure is higher for girls who identify as LGBTQ.

The findings also revealed girls from Black, Asian, and minority backgrounds are “more likely” than their white peers not to use social media “because of fear of criticism of their bodies.”

As part of their 2020 survey, which spoke to more than 2,000 young women aged 11-21, Bustle reports that Girlguiding is calling out the apps, filters, and online adverts that “knock girls’ confidence.”

In reaction, a new #FilterDrop campaign has emerged online—but what is it and how is it helping?

UK-based model and make-up artist Sasha Louise Pallari launched the #FilterDrop campaign after noticing influencers “advertising a makeup brand with a beautifying filter on.” Taking to Instagram, the 28-year-old claims “false advertising” in this way is contributing to low self-esteem.

“I so strongly wish you would realize the vast scale of damage the constant use of filters are,” she wrote in the caption. “Flawless, poreless, scarless, wrinkle-less skin does not exist and it’s only because of the overuse of these [filters] we believe it does.”

In a video posted to her Instagram page, the model showcased how drastically different filters can make you look. In the clip, she’s seen heavily filtered and with her “normal skin.”

And, following the response to her filter-free images, Pallari has since devoted her Instagram page to normalizing skin blemishes on the app, as well as exposing the deceptive nature of filters.

She writes in another post: “Please think about what using filters all the time is doing to our already damaged society. A LOT of money is made from us not feeling good enough. So let this be a reminder that your pores, wrinkles and the texture on your skin are beautiful, yet still the least interesting things about you.”

The model also questioned the lasting damage filters could have on children who may base their self-worth on “how beautiful they are” and “the filter they need in order to even be beautiful.”

It’s a legitimate concern.

People seem to be watching. The #FilterDrop campaign page on Instagram now shows hundreds of photos of people ditching the filter and sharing what they really look like. Here’s hoping for a more unfiltered reality.

Research contact: @bustle

‘Do dust bunnies eat kibble?’ Turns out a lot of quarantined rich people have no idea how to clean

May 13, 2020

Among the life lessons that some people are learning under quarantine are how to use the clothes washer and where to find the toilet cleaner. In fact, a friend of this writer recently wailed on Facebook, “I’ve never done the laundry before! Not once in my life!” One week later, she griped, “My clothes are dirty again.”  She misses her maid more than anyone else.

Indeed, .according to a May 2019 report published by the Bureau Of Labor Statistics (BLS), there are 100,490 maids and housekeeping cleaners working in “buildings and dwellings” nationwide—47,990 of whom are employed in New York. That number includes hotel workers and does not include those paid off the books; but basically, many people pay someone else to clean up their mess.

And for those sheltering in place without their help, the day of reckoning has come Bustle reports.

What’s more, it’s little surprise that some domestic workers (when they aren’t worrying about their lost income) are finding the quandary that their erstwhile employers are in both piteous and slightly funny.

For example, Marcella (who doesn’t want her last name used in this story) tells Bustle that—five days a week for 22 years—she has been taking the number 6 train from her apartment in Crown Heights, Brooklyn, to the Upper East Side of Manhattan, where she works as a full-time housekeeper. She’s witnessed a lot over the course of her tenure: the graduation of two children, the election of five United States presidents, a nasty fight with the co-op board. One thing she never saw? Her employer clean her own apartment. Until, that is, the pandemic hit. “She called and asked where I keep the vacuum cleaner, how to turn the washing machine on,” Marcella tells Bustle. “The lady doesn’t have a clue.”

As New Yorkers continue to shelter at home, the upper crust are quarantined away in million-dollar apartments and Bridgehampton houses, with closets full of cleaning products they have no idea how to use.

“I got an email from a client asking what lightbulb is used in the chandelier in her family room — I guess she’s spending more time there,” Sue, an interior designer who has catered to wealthy Upper East Side clientele for 30 years, tells Bustle. “I walked her through ordering from the manufacturer’s website, but couldn’t actually teach her how to change it. I told her to go to her super.”

Sue has also heard from clients who are panicking over how to clean their floors. Their questions range from what vacuum setting to use to what soap is best for mopping limestone. “They’re noticing what needs to be done to take care of their own households,” she says.

Those who won’t dial the phone for help are turning to Google. Alejandra Costello and Nikki Boyd, organizational coaches and YouTubers who specialize in cleaning tutorials, say traffic has spiked since stay-at-home orders were issued across the world. Costello’s is 123% over what it was this time last year, and Boyd’s has tripled. “How to Mop” and “How to Turn on Vacuum” both have spiked in Google searches since February, per Google Trends

According to Laura Schocker, editor-in-chief of Apartment Therapy, page views on the site’s cleaning vertical have nearly doubled. “We have seen that content explode over the past couple of months,” she tells Bustle.

And when the Internet won’t suffice, you can always turn to your mom. That’s the position Emily, a 25-year-old wealth management advisor, has found herself in. After moving into a studio apartment in Soho last fall, she promptly hired a bi-weekly maid service. “I didn’t tell my friends,” she tells Bustle. “I worried they’d judge me.”

But now that Emily’s daily routine has been confined to four walls, she’s coming to the realization that she never learned how to properly clean her space. So, she’s been pestering her mother with every little question. “I did not go into finance to deal with this sh*t,” she says.

On March 10, Michelle, an Upper East Side resident who has been quarantined with her husband for 58 days, gave her housekeeper of 30 years the option of social distancing with the couple. Her housekeeper preferred to isolate along with her own daughter, and declined Michelle’s offer. “I live in quite a large apartment, and maintaining a big household is a lot of work,” she tells Bustle. “Would I love her to come and live with us? I’d love it. I’ve always appreciated her, but I appreciate her even more now.”

. Instead of calling her housekeeper for help, she’s found herself Googling “soap scum marble?” in confinement. But, she says, her husband is even more clueless. “He’s usually at work, and doesn’t know how to use the vacuum, or where the sponges are kept, or where we store extra detergent or a rag. He ruined my stuff by washing the darks and the whites together, but loves doing laundry.”

Therein lies the risk. What if the rich were to become overnight Lysol enthusiasts — Marie Konheads, drunk off of the joy of tidying up—and render an entire industry of service workers obsolete?

Such concerns are top of mind for Grace, a Polish immigrant, who has cleaned for the same four families since the 1990s and relies entirely on word-of-mouth for employment. She tells Bustle that between her 30 days out of work and her bosses texting her cleaning questions, she’s worried that, come quarantine’s end, she could be out of a job.

“I’m afraid that if [they] like cleaning, I may lose my work,” she says.

We beg to differ. We think that, when sheltering in place is over, maids will be welcomed back with the same enthusiasm that healthcare workers are invoking now.

Research contact: @bustle

Bark once for food and twice for toys: Amazon’s Super Bowl ad features ‘failed’ Alexa apps

February 4, 2019

Does your dog like Alexa better than you? The Amazon home virtual assistant now is making life easier in millions of homes nationwide and, according to Top Dog Tips, it does almost as much for canines as it does for its human customers.

Alexa will play calming music when you command, “Relax my dog;” it will connect you with a licensed veterinarian when you upload the app, MyPetDoc; and it can tape your dog when you are not at home through a Furbo HD Treat Tossing Camera. It offers pet trivia, dog training lessons, and much, much more.

And, if Alexa has her limits, that’s not what actor Harrison Ford finds out in a wacky Amazon Super Bowl commercial that will air on Sunday, February 3.

According to a preview by the website Bustle, the Alexa ”smart collar app” for dog-walking is just one of the many funny, but feeble, products featured in the commercial—which begins with an Amazon employee remarking, “We’re putting Alexa in a lot of things now. But trust me, there are a lot of fails.”

In the commercial, Ford looks super-frustrated when his pup keeps barking its food orders at Alexa. He becomes even more cantankerous when a delivery truck filled with doggie treats shows up at the curb.

Another faux failed product featured in the ad is an Alexa toothbrush, used by Forest Whitaker.  But even more outrageous is the Alexa hot tub—a jacuzzi that shoots water from its jets, in time with the tempo of a song. Poor Ilana Glazer and Abbi Jacobson get ejected from the tub when the water hits them with fire-hydrant strength during a jazzed-up tune.

It’s all for fun, ratings, and product promotion at the annual football fracas—when the ads attract as much attention as the action on the field.

According to Business Insider, the ad slots won’t come cheap this year: CBS is charging north of $5 million for a 30-second spot. Among the brands that have bought in are newbies such as beauty brand Olay, dating app Bumble, and Kraft’s frozen-food brand Devour; along with regulars including Anheuser-Busch InBev, Doritos, Pepsi,  Avocados From Mexico, and Kia.

Research contact: @Bustle