Posts tagged with "Blog"

Introducing Twitter Blue, which comes with more bells and whistles—and a subscription price

July 14, 2021

Twitter is rolling out its first-ever subscription product this week in Australia and Canada, the social media site has announced on its blog.

“We’ve heard from the people that use Twitter a lot, and we mean a lot, that we don’t always build power features that meet their needs. Well, that’s about to change,” the blog states, adding, “We took this feedback to heart, and are developing and iterating upon a solution that will give the people who use Twitter the most what they are looking for: access to exclusive features and perks that will take their experience on Twitter to the next level.”

And for those wondering, no, a free Twitter is not going away, and never will. This subscription offering is simply meant to add enhanced and complementary features to the already existing Twitter experience for those who want it.

Those who sign up for a Twitter Blue subscription will get a set of features and perks that include the following:

  • Bookmark Folders:Want an easy way to better organize your saved content? Bookmark Folders let you organize the Tweets you’ve saved by letting you manage content so when you need it, you can find it easily and efficiently.
  • Reader Mode:Reader Mode provides a more beautiful reading experience by getting rid of the noise. Twitter is making it easier for you to keep up with long threads on Twitter by turning them into easy-to-read text so you can read all the latest content seamlessly.
  • Perks: Subscribers will get access to perks, such as customizable app icons for their device’s home screen and fun color themes for their Twitter app; andwill have access to dedicated subscription customer support.

The current monthly price in Canada and Australia, respectively, is CAD $3.49 or AUD $4.49 (or about $2.75 in U.S. dollars).

Research contact: @Twitter

Ravelry, a social network for knitters, dumps Trump supporters

June 25, 2019

There has been too much “needling’ lately on a popular knitting and crocheting website—and now the online community has announced that it won’t host Trump’s political supporters anymore.

Since 2007, Boston-based Ravelry has helped knitters, crocheters, designers, spinners, weavers, and dyers to keep track of their yarn, tools, project, and pattern information—as well as to communicate with others for ideas and inspiration.

So long as those ideas and inspiration don’t come from President Donald Trump,

In a blog post released on June 23, Ravelry announced it is banning support of Trump and his administration in forum posts, projects, patterns, profiles, and all other content on the site.

Announcing the ban, Ravelry said: “We cannot provide a space that is inclusive of all and also allow support for open white supremacy. Support of the Trump administration is undeniably support for white supremacy.’

According to the website, the policy includes the following stipulations:

  • You still will be able to participate if you support the administration; you just can’t talk about it on Ravelry.
  • We are not endorsing the Democrats nor banning Republicans.
  • We are definitely not banning conservative politics. Hate groups and intolerance are different from other types of political positions.
  • We are not banning people for past support.
  • Do not try to weaponize this policy by entrapping people who do support the Trump administration into voicing their support.
  • Similarly, antagonizing conservative members for their unstated positions is not acceptable.

Members can help by flagging any of the following items, if they constitute support for Trump or his administration:

  • Projects: Unacceptable projects will be made invisible to others.
  • Patterns: Unacceptable patterns will be returned to drafts.
  • Forum posts: Right now, only posts written after Sunday, June 23rd at 8 AM Eastern
  • Profiles: Users are asked not to flag profiles yet, if the only banned content is an avatar or avatars. There is not yet a flagging system for those.

According to founder Jessica (known online as “Mama Rav”), “The content here is all user-driven; we as a community make the site what it is. Ravelry is a great place for you to keep notes about your projects, see what other people are making, find the perfect pattern and connect with people who love to play with yarn from all over the world in our forums.”

But to talk about politics? Not so much.

Research contact: @ravelry

Twitter to remove inactive accounts, rolling back users’ follower counts

July 13, 2018

Twitter Legal, Policy and Trust & Safety Lead Vijaya Gadde announced on July 11 that the social media giant will start removing tens of millions of locked, inactive accounts this week—a global initiative that she said would reduce the number of followers displayed on many profiles.

The company has opted to do so, Gadde said, because “we want everyone to have confidence that the numbers are meaningful and accurate.”

Why does an account get locked in the first place? Twitter detects changes in tweeting behavior—and shuts the account down in order to contact the owner to confirm that he or she still has control of it.

Among the suspicious changes in behavior:

  • Tweeting a large volume of unsolicited replies or mentions;
  • Tweeting misleading links;
  • Blocking of the account by a large number of other members; or
  • Use of email and password combinations from other services that could jeopardize the security of an account.

Most people will see a change of four followers or fewer; others with larger follower counts will experience a more significant drop.

The frozen accounts being deleted represent “about 6% of follows on Twitter,” Ian Plunkett, a Twitter spokesperson, told Politico.

According to the political news outlet, “The move could stoke conservatives’ ire, particularly if President Donald Trump, with his roughly 53.4 million followers as of today, is among the users that lose a large number of followers. Twitter faced heaps of criticism from the right in February for silencing scores of accounts it said were spam or ill-intentioned bots. Conservatives, alleging censorship, branded the episode “#TwitterLockout.”

Will the initiative expand to include Tweets, Likes, and Retweets? Gadde says, “Our ongoing work to improve the health of conversations on Twitter encompasses all aspects of our service. This specific update is focused on followers, because it is one of the most visible features on our service and often associated with account credibility. Once an account is locked, it cannot Tweet, Like, or Retweet—and it is not served ads.”

Research contact: @vijaya