Posts tagged with "Best Life"

Gasp! If you have asthma, researchers find you might be at lower risk for COVID

January 20, 2021

You know the factors that put you at an increased risk of a severe battle with the novel coronavirus: your age, your weight, and any preexisting conditions you may have, to name a few.

But what factors might keep you safer? According to new research published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, one surprising group may be less apt to contract COVID-19—and that’s people with asthma.

According to a report by Best Life, the research was conducted by an Israeli team, who tested 37,469 patients— 6% percent of whom were positive for the virus. Among that infected group, 6.75% had asthma. However, among patients who were negative for the virus, 9.62 percent of them were asthmatic. As a result, the researchers concluded that there’s “lower COVID-19 susceptibility in patients with preexisting asthma.”

According to the U.S. enters for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), that means that the 7.7 percent of American adults and 7.5 percent of American children who have asthma may be somewhat protected from the virus.

Given that COVID-19 most commonly attacks the lungs and breathing system, these findings may seem counterintuitive. But there are a few possible explanations for this, according to researcher Eugene Merzon, MD, of Tel-Aviv University.

Speaking to The Jerusalem Post, Merzon gave three reasons for the extra level of safety that people asthma enjoy:

  • First, asthmatics have lower levels of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptors—the mechanism by which the novel coronavirus attaches to and infects cell;
  • Secondly, asthmatics take more lifestyle precautions that could help them avoid contracting COVID-1, because they know that the impact of it may be more serious; and
  • Thirdly, the treatments patients routinely take for asthma, specifically inhaled coricosteroids (ICS), also may reduce their risk of catching the virus.

That being said, according to Best Life, Merzon advised caution, as the study only looked at hospital in-patients. “All these prevalence data were derived from the COVID-19 inpatient population,” the researchers wrote. “Therefore, the prevalence of asthma may be different in outpatient patients with COVID-19.”

However, the research supports previous findings on asthma and coronaviruses: In studies also cited by the researchers, patients with asthma appeared to have fared better in earlier outbreaks of acute respiratory conditions, like the 2003 SARS epidemic.

Research contact: @BestLifeOnline

Photo finish: 33% of us are guilty of doing this to our exes, research shows

November 19, 2020

It’s human nature to want to rid yourself of any reminders of your ex after he or she is out of the picture. The thought of seeing you and your ex-boyfriend or ex-girlfriend smiling in a picture together is often too much to bear. So, you take their photos down from your wall, donate the old sweatshirt they left in your drawer—and if you’re like many people, you delete any evidence of them from your social media profiles, as well, Best Life reports.

Dating app Plenty of Fish has just released its annual list of dating trends—and points out that this phenomenon is fairly common among daters, with more than one-third of people copping to it. In fact, there’s a word for it: sanitizing, which Plenty of Fish describes as “the act of wiping your social media of all photographic evidence of a past relationship.”

There are many reasons you may feel compelled to delete all traces of your ex from social media—and the following may be among them:

  • It helps you avoid those “Where’s your better half?” questions. If you want to avoid getting asked where your partner is all the time, deleting him or her from your social media can be a good way to send the message to others that you two are no longer together.
  • After a breakup, you enter a new chapter of your life, and with that shift, you may want to reinvent yourself a bit. Relationship expert and matchmaker Rori Sassoon tells Best Life that people are eager to “redo, restart, and reinvent themselves” after a relationship ends. “Once you break up, it’s not about the relationship anymore; it’s about you and your next chapter in life, which doesn’t include that other person.”
  • It’s cathartic. If you were in a toxic or abusive relationship, you’ll likely want to remove anything that will remind you of that experience. Indeed, deleting these images could even be therapeutic. Pressing ‘delete  on photo after photo, many of which are associated with painful memories, can feel cathartic and help you move on.
  • It helps you gain closure. Catching a glimpse of your ex every time you open an app could make it harder for you to move forward. Removing those photos allows you a symbolic fresh start. “Closure is an important part of the healing process to allow the person to move on,” marriage counselor Wyatt Fisher tells Best Life. “Part of what helps with closure is removing everything that reminds you of your ex, including all pictures of him or her on social media.”
  • It signals that you’re single and ready to mingle. If your Instagram is inundated with photos of you and your ex, it may impede on your ability to get back out there when you’re ready. Some people sanitize to make it clear on their profile that they’re single.

Research contact: @bestlife

Soaked to the skin: Why you could be applying too much moisturizer

November 4, 2020

If your skin is dry, the answer is always more moisturizer, right? Well, not necessarily. According to experts, there is such a thing as over-moisturizing your skin—and using too much lotion can do more harm than good, according to a report by Best Life.

“Yes, you can use too much [moisturizer],” skincare producer Garnier told the publication. “Facial moisturizers are designed to be concentrated, and applying more of a moisturizer doesn’t cause better skin results, Sometimes it can even do the opposite.”

Your skin knows to produce a certain amount of moisture on its own. However, “if you over-moisturize, over time, it will make your skin want to produce less moisture on its own,” says esthetician Nidah Barber-Raymond, owner of The Peel Connection in Beverly Hills.

“Overdoing it will send a message to your skin that it has enough hydration, proteins, and lipids and that it can slow down the production of these vital skin nutrients,” Barber-Raymond told Best Life.

Wondering if you’re moisturizing your skin too much? Here are the key signs:

So, how much is the right amount of moisturizer to use? Barber-Raymond told Best Life that using a “nickel size amount of moisturizer one to two times per day depending on your needs.”

Research contact: @BestLifeOnline

Color me beautiful: Don’t wear this shade on a first date, researchers say

September 23, 2020

It’s the color of any number of good things—the sun, canaries, school buses, corn bread, rubber duckies, lemons, bananas, egg yolks—but it’s definitely not the color you should wear on a first date.

Indeed, findings of a poll conducted by vouchercodespro.co.uk among 1,128 females and 1,232 males across the United Kingdom, wearing the color yellow can instantly make you appear less attractive to a prospective suitor.

Both men and women find yellow to be among the least attractive color options: 39% of men and 31% of women said it was likely to be a sartorial put-off, Best Life reports.

First impressions are superficial, but they have lasting effects on the way in which we are perceived. A 2010 study published in the journalEvolutionary Psychologyfound that men and women both ranked the opposite sex as the least attractive when they were clad in yellow duds.

Plus, a survey conducted by U.K.-based clothing company Buyshirtsonline found that yellow once again ranked near the bottom alongside brown and orange as the color least likely to inspire confidence. Additionally, it was one of the colors that “exudes arrogance,” alongside orange and red.

Finally, would the color of a date’s outfit be sufficient reason to turn down another meeting with that person? Best Life reports that fully 38% of women and 27% of men said yes.

Research contact: @bestlife