Posts tagged with "Beijing"

Trump bans TikTok, WeChat from app stores beginning September 20

September 21, 2020

In a move that will sharply raise tensions with Beijing from app—and infuriate about 100 million American active users—the Trump Administration has announced that it is banning China’s virally popular TikTok, as well as the less sought-after WeChat, from mobile app stores beginning September 20, The Washington Post reports.

On Sunday, the United States also will ban any provision of Internet hosting services that enables WeChat to be used for money transfers or mobile payments. The Administration will give TikTok until November 12 until further bans kick in.

Western companies and bankers still continue to wrangle with TikTok’s owner, the White House, and Chinese authorities to try to arrange a sale of some of TikTok’s business, the Post says. Indeed, TikTok’s partnership with a U.S. corporation— most likely Oracle—could save it in this country, but details about such decisions remain unclear.

“Today’s actions prove once again that President Trump will do everything in his power to guarantee our national security and protect Americans from the threats of the Chinese Communist Party,” U.S. Department of Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said in a statement. “At the President’s direction, we have taken significant action to combat China’s malicious collection of American citizens’ personal data, while promoting our national values, democratic rules-based norms, and aggressive enforcement of U.S. laws and regulations.”

Meanwhile, the Independent reports, TikTok denies that it has shared user data with the Chinese government, or that it would do so if asked. The company says it has not censored videos at the request of Chinese authorities and insists it is not a national-security threat.

“The President has provided until November 12 for the national security concerns posed by TikTok to be resolved. If they are, the prohibitions in this order may be lifted,” Commerce said in its statement.

Research contact: @washingtonpost

Without fanfare, Senate votes to abate tariffs on Chinese goods

July 30, 2018

As trade tensions escalate between the Trump administration and Beijing, the U.S. Senate with little fanfare passed legislation on July 26 that would lower trade barriers on hundreds of items made in China, CNBC reported. A version of that bill already had passed unanimously in the House of Representatives earlier this year.

With no debate, the Senate unanimously passed a bill that would cut or eliminate tariffs on toasters, chemicals—and roughly 1,660 other items made outside the United States, the business news network said. Nearly half of those items are produced in China, based on a Reuters analysis of government records.

The move is meant to neutralize a 25% tariff on up to $50 billion of Chinese goods that Trump announced in mid-June—as well as a subsequent move by China to impose a 25% retaliatory tariff on $34 billion worth of U.S. goods, including agricultural products and U.S.-made cars.

In June, CNN reported that Trump meant his tariffs on Chinese goods to penalize Beijing for stealing American technology and trade secrets. The news network said that the “tariff is targeted towards the Chinese aerospace, robotics, manufacturing and auto industries.”

According to CNBC, the White House has not publicly taken a position on the so-called Miscellaneous Tariff Bill Act of 2018. The Senate and House now need to resolve minor differences before they can send the legislation to President Trump to sign into law.

The National Association of Manufacturers has said U.S. businesses pay $1 million a day on such import duties. In a statement, NAM urged passage of the act, “to eliminate unfair, out-of-date, distortive, and anticompetitive taxes on manufacturers.”

When asked in an April 11 Quinnipiac poll if they would support or oppose “raising tariffs on products imported from China, if it causes China to raise tariffs on American products,” 51% of U.S. adults nationwide said they would oppose the tariffs and 40% said they would support them. There was a partisan divide in the results, with two-thirds of Republicans supporting Trump’s actions.

Research contact: timothy.malloy@quinnipiac.edu