Posts tagged with "Affordable Care Act"

Never mind: Trump reverses himself on Obamacare replacement vote

April 4, 2019

President Donald Trump now claims he never wanted Congress to “repeal and replace” Obamacare ahead of the 2020 elections, even though he unexpectedly revived the issue and pushed for swift action over the course of the past week, The Hill reports.

“I was never planning a vote prior to the 2020 Election on the wonderful HealthCare package that some very talented people are now developing for me & the Republican Party. It will be on full display during the Election as a much better & less expensive alternative to ObamaCare,” he tweeted.

The president denied that pressure from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Kentucky) led him to change his plans, even though he announced his decision after speaking with the top GOP senator on Monday.

“I never asked Mitch McConnell for a vote before the Election as has been incorrectly reported (as usual) in the @nytimes, but only after the Election when we take back the House etc. Republicans will always support pre-existing conditions!” Trump wrote.

However, The Hill reported that, on Monday, April 1, McConnell told the president that he would not bow to White House demands to revisit healthcare so soon, and that the Senate will not be moving comprehensive health care legislation before the 2020 election, despite the president asking Senate Republicans to do that in a meeting last week.

McConnell said he made clear to the president that Senate Republicans will work on bills to keep down the cost of health care, but that they will not work on a comprehensive package to replace the Affordable Care Act.

Following that conversation—and his own about-face in tweets on the issue—President Trump predicted that healthcare “will be a great campaign issue” for Republicans.

I wanted to delay it myself. I want to put it after the election because we don’t have the House,” the president told reporters in the Oval Office.

Research contact: @thehill

Democrats: Trump’s move to terminate Obamacare gives us a gift ahead of 2020

March 28, 2019

In a move that has appalled his own advisers, and alarmed the G.O.P. as a whole, President Donald Trump on March 27 began a legal effort to “essentially terminate” the entire Affordable Care Act ―including its heretofore sacrosanct pre-existing conditions protections.

About half of Americans—133 million—have a health issue that qualifies as a pre-existing condition. Under the ACA, also known as Obamacare, insurers have been banned from denying coverage for (or from charging more for plans that cover) pre-existing conditions.

And American voters have made it clear that they like it that way. According to a poll by the Kaiser Family Foundation just before the midterm elections last November, fully 58% of Americans said they were “very concerned” that Republicans would remove this safeguard—and expose them either to higher costs or no coverage at all.

In fact, at that time, healthcare was top-of-mind for U.S. voters—and indications are that it continues to be.

According to a report by the Huffington Post,  Democrats are saying that the president’s extreme position on the ACA will matter far more to voters in 2020 than anything coming out of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into the 2016 presidential election.

And while Republicans have said for years that the ACA should be “repealed and replaced,” they are not so sure that the issue should be revisited at this time.

It comes down to this: On March 25, the Department of Justice asked federal courts to throw out all of Obamacare, not just one part of it, as it had done previously. If the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals, which is weighing the lawsuit, agrees with the government, the matter will almost certainly go before the Supreme Court, which has already turned away two major challenges to the 2010 healthcare law, the Huffington Post notes. With two new Trump-picked justices on the high court, however, there is no telling whether the law would survive a third.

“This move by the Trump administration to take away health care will prove far more detrimental to the administration and the Republican Party than any gains they might have made by the issuance” of Attorney General William Barr’s letter summarizing the findings of Mueller’s investigation, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-New York.) said on March 26.

 “They are literally teeing this up as an issue for Democrats for the next year and a half. They’re not even making a laughable attempt to save the most popular parts of the Affordable Care Act,” Senator Chris Murphy (D-Connecticut) told reporters on Tuesday.

Vulnerable Republican senators up for re-election in 2020, whose seats Democrats need to win in order to take back control of the Senate, are likely to face additional attacks over healthcare following the Trump administration’s new stance on the lawsuit. But GOP leaders say they have confidence in their members to fend off attacks over Obamacare going into the 2020 election.

By contrast, the Huffington Post reports, G.O.P. senators facing tough re-election fights in 2020 said they support popular elements of the Affordable Care Act even as they continue to maintain that the law should be repealed ― a delicate rhetorical balancing act that failed to save many GOP members of Congress in the 2018 midterm election.

“I support coverage for pre-existing provisions, and Congress should act to make sure that happens. I think what we need to do is make sure we have affordable health care,” Senator Cory Gardner (R-Colorado), who is facing a tough campaign, told reporters.

Only Senator Susan Collins (R-Maine), who voted against repealing Obamacare in 2017, criticized the decision to argue in court that the entire law should be struck down as unconstitutional.

“It is highly unusual for the [Department of Justice] not to defend duly enacted laws, which the Affordable Care Act certainly was. This decision to even go more broadly in failing to defend the law is very disappointing,” Collins said.

Research contact: @HuffPost

As GOP moves to cut coverage of pre-existing conditions, its candidates say the opposite

October 25, 2018

Republicans candidates are feverishly back-pedaling on their plundering of Obamacare—and are regretting filing lawsuits to relieve insurers of their responsibility to cover pre-existing conditions, according to a report by Rachel Maddow of MSNBC on October 23.

A poll released on October 18 by the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, found that fully 71% of U.S. voters say healthcare is the most important issue driving them to the polls in the midterm elections. That’s good for Democrats who are running, but bad for the GOP, Maddow said.

But that’s not stopping Republican candidates—and the president—from misrepresenting their true positions, the cable news anchor said.

In fact, Maddow identified five candidates who, she said, are lying about their overall support for healthcare—and their antipathy toward coverage of pre-existing conditions.

Among those whom Maddow said had voted against the Affordable Care Act, but who now say they support it are Representative Martha McSally (R-2nd District-Arizona); Senator Ted Cruz (R-Texas); Senator Dean Heller (R-Nevada); Representative Dana Rohrabacher (R-48th District-California); and Representative Kevin Cramer (R-North Dakota).

In particular, Senator Ted Cruz once spoke for more than 21 hours about his opposition to Obamacare, including a dramatic reading of the Dr. Seuss classic “Green Eggs and Ham” on the Senate floor, The Washington Post reminded readers on October 25. The speech was styled as a filibuster, but was not actually one — no vote was being delayed; Cruz was just making a memorable stink about how much he did not like Obamacare.

President Donald Trump also is prevaricating about his true position: “Republicans will always protect people with pre-existing conditions,” Trump said at a rally on October 23 in support of Senator Dean Heller in Nevada.

However, Maddow’s Producer Steve Benen wrote on her blog on October 24, “In reality, Republicans continue to fight to gut the ACA’s protections for Americans with pre-existing conditions, and a total number of zero Democratic officials “have been talking about” scaling back the existing Obamacare safeguards”(although the GOP claims they are).

“This is not a fight in which a complex truth lurks in some gray area in between partisan talking points. Republicans have not only fought for years to strip Americans with pre-existing conditions of their protections; they’re also–right now – trying to get the courts to gut these protections, too,” Benen wrote.

He noted, “If the midterm elections are going to be about which party is sincere about championing protections for those with pre-existing conditions, Republicans are likely to have a rough year.”

Research contact: @stevebenen

Democrat Joe Manchin targets GOP effort to rescind ACA protections for pre-existing conditions

September 12, 2018

In a new, 30-second campaign ad, U.S. Senator Joe Manchin (D-West Virginia) literally takes out a rifle and shoots a document representing the Republican-led lawsuit that could end a key and very popular Affordable Care Act provision. The ad takes direct aim against the GOP effort to invalidate Obamacare’s insurance protections for people with pre-existing medical conditions, the Huffington Post reported on September 10.

West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrissey, Manchin’s Republican challenger in the midterm election, is among the plaintiffs in the lawsuit that would allow insurance companies to deny coverage to people with various pre-existing conditions.

“He is just dead wrong and that ain’t going to happen,” Manchin says in his ad.

In a state where polls show approval of President Donald Trump is among the highest in the country, Manchin is making healthcare the central focus of his re-election bid, the Huffington Post noted.

And it’s not hard to see why: West Virginia has the highest share of adults with pre-existing conditions of any state.

The Obamacare protections are “the difference between life and death for the 800,000 West Virginians with a pre-existing condition. I will continue doing everything in my power to protect their access to affordable health care,” Manchin said at a Pre-Existing Conditions Forum in Huntington, West Virginia, 

Last week, attorneys representing 20 Republican state officials walked into a Texas courtroom and ask a federal judge to invalidate all or parts of Obamacare.

District Judge Reed O’Connor for the Northern District of Texas appeared sympathetic to their case in oral arguments, but he did not immediately rule on the lawsuit’s motion for an injunction against the law.

If it succeeds, experts say it will unleash chaos on the health insurance markets, the news outlet reports, and, eventually, leave an estimated 17 million Americans without coverage.

The latest Kaiser Health Tracking Poll, released on September 5, finds recent political events weighing heavy on the minds of voters when it comes to the 2018 midterm elections. Kaiser Family Foundation polling continues to find pre-existing conditions as a widespread concern and with the impending lawsuit Texas v. United States, a majority of the public say it is “very important” that the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) protections for people with pre-existing conditions ensuring guaranteed coverage (75%) and community rating (72%) remain law.

About half (52%) of the public are “very worried” that they or someone in their family will have to pay more for health insurance and four in ten (41%) are “very worried” they will lose their coverage if the Supreme Court overturns these protections.

Research contact: @KaiserFamFound

ACA credited for Lamb victory in special election

March 16, 2018

Following the special election in Pennsylvania’s 18th Congressional District on March 13, Affordable Care Act advocates are touting a telephone exit poll of voters showing that fully 52% of those who cast ballots saw healthcare as a top priority—and they believed that Democrat Conor Lamb better represented their views on the issue than did his opponent, Republican Rick Saccone.

Conducted by Public Policy Polling within the heavily Republican district—which President Trump won by 20 points in 2016—the research found that voters remain angry about Republican efforts to repeal and replace Obamacare last summer, The Washington Post reports.  

On healthcare, voters said Lamb better reflected their views by 7 points (45% to 38%) over Saccone. Among Independents, that gap widened to 16 points—with 50% saying Lamb’s healthcare views were more in line with theirs.

Saccone advocated for repealing the ACA and called on his website for “using free-market principles to fix our health-care crisis.” The Washington Post reported, noting, “His defeat raises many questions for Republican candidates eyeing this election year nervously—including how to talk about healthcare now that Congress has failed to repeal the law.”

Research contact: information@publicpolicypolling.com