Posts tagged with "2020 presidential run?"

Dems cast McConnell as ‘Grim Reaper’ in campaign strategy for 2020

June 10, 2019

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell confirmed on June 5 that he’s unlikely to bring up the bill passed by the House on June 4 to provide a path to citizenship for immigrants brought to the United States as children, known as “Dreamers.”

That should come as no surprise to anyone familiar with House Speaker Nancy’s Pelosi’s domestic agenda—from gun control to net neutrality, to LGBTQ protections, to voting reforms—which the GOP leader has totally tuned out and tossed out.

But now the Democrats have decided to use what they are dubbing McConnell’s “legislative graveyard,” as a messaging tool to topple Republican candidates in 2020, The Hill reported on June 7.

“He’s an issue in this campaign,” said Representative Jim McGovern (D-Massachusetts), chairman of the powerful House Rules Committee. “I don’t know what the hell he’s for, I only know what he’s against. … Anything that helps working people, or helps those struggling to get into the middle class, he’s against.”

McGovern is hardly alone, The Hill noted. Pelosi frequently has denounced McConnell’s promise to act as a “Grim Reaper” on any House legislation as a barrier to any progress on Capitol Hill. This week, she marked the first 150 days of the Democrats’ House majority by rattling off a slew of proposals already passed by the lower chamber that now sit idle in the Senate.

“We’re very proud of the work that we have done to send over to the Senate, where Mitch McConnell has said he’s the ‘Grim Reaper’ — it’s a Senate graveyard,” she told reporters in the Capitol. “We have news for him: It’s alive and well in the public, and he will be hearing from the public, hopefully very soon.”

McConnell and the Republicans are returning fire—dismissing the Democrats’ proposals as frivolous acts—designed to energize the Democrats’ base but without a chance of becoming law.

“This isn’t a serious strategy to govern. They’re passing bills saying that this is what they want, but they know that they’re strictly basing their strategy on what polls well and not what can get into law,” said a Senate GOP aide. “They’re doing everything for political reasons, and we’re actually the adults in the room.”

Through the lens of political messaging, however, Democrats see a useful foil in McConnell, who has spent much of the year focused on confirming conservative Trump appointees, including almost two dozen judges, in lieu of passing policy bills. By casting McConnell as the face of Washington gridlock, The Hill noted, Democrats hope to portray the entire GOP as uninterested in governing — at the expense of the middle class.

Representative Hakeem Jeffries (D-New York), chairman of the House Democratic Caucus, blasted McConnell this past week as the Senate’s “Rip van Winkle,” urging upper-chamber Republicans “to wake up from their legislative slumber and do their job.”

None of this fazes McConnell. “I’ve kind of enjoyed playing off of my enemies over the years, and in fact the ‘Grim Reaper’ title I gave myself,” he told Fox News. “Happy to embrace it.”

Research contact: @TheHill

Swalwell: Congress is working to extend criminal statute of limitations for sitting presidents

March 20, 2019

Representative Eric Swalwell (D-California) revealed during an appearance on MSNBC’s Morning Joe on March 19 that House lawmakers are penning legislation to extend the statute of limitations for crimes committed by presidents—allowing them to be charged once their terms end, Politico reported.

With the Russia investigation expected to wrap up in the coming weeks, Swalwell told hosts Joe Scarborough and Mica Brzezinski that Congress is preparing for the prospect that Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s much-awaited report will conclude that Donald Trump’s presidential campaign colluded with Russia.

“I don’t think any person should be above the law,” Swalwell said, adding, “What concerns me is that right now the president may escape criminal liability because he could win a reelection and the statute of limitations could run” out.

Indeed, freezing the statute of limitations during a president’s term—a move that House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler (D-New York) said he was considering last year—could allow for prosecution once a president leaves office.

When asked whether he is writing the proposed legislation, Swalwell said it is “in the works,” according to Politico.

“But I do believe there are indictments waiting for this president,” said Swalwell, a member of the House Judiciary and Intelligence committees.

The statute of limitations in most federal cases is five years, a deadline that could play a role, Politico said, in any case involving Trump.

Swalwell — who is mulling a 2020 presidential run — said he believes circumstantial evidence of collusion exists and that he feels confident the public will see Mueller’s report once the probe is complete.

Research contact: @politico