Signs that you have become ‘part of the furniture’ at work

March 29, 2018

Realizing most of your coworkers are younger than you, being able to poke fun at your boss and having your own mug in the office all are  signs that you have become “part of the furniture” at your place of employment, based on findings of a recent poll by SPANA.

Indeed, among the 2,000 British office workers who responded, 33% said that you will know you have become a fixture at work when new people come to you with questions about company policies.

Also among the top indicators: When you can tell if someone has fiddled with your chair settings while you were away and when colleagues knowing exactly how you like your coffee. Or when you dodge company nights out, because you already have attended dozens of them.

How long does it take to become an office “institution”? Fifty-six percent of respondents said they felt like that after an average of four and one-half years on the job.

Geoffrey Dennis, the CEO of international animal charity SPANA, which provides free veterinary treatment to working animals in developing countries, states: “The days of ‘a job for life’ may increasingly be a thing of the past in [Britain], but it’s clear many British workers feel comfortable and secure in their roles and will stay with the right company for a number of years.”

Other give-aways: One in five employees can remember their office going through several reorganizations and redesigns during the years they have been in post.

Fully 10%  of employees also reckon they’ve been working in the same place for such a long time, they don’t feel like they could ever work anywhere else—even if they don’t get the respect they deserve.

But for 81 per cent of respondents, there was no specific moment that made them feel like they’d become a workplace institution, with the feeling creeping up gradually.

Eight in 10 office workers also say that, despite everything, they enjoy feeling like part of the furniture at work, although 68% believe their working conditions—including pay, their job description and job—should be updated.

Research contact: Hello@spana.org

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