Researchers: Ties are a ‘socially desirable’ form of strangulation

July 18, 2018

Don’t tie that knot! The “business casual” dress code recently adopted by many firms actually has proven to be healthier for male workers. Indeed, findings of a study conducted at Germany’s Kiel University Hospital and released on June 30 show that wearing a tie actually can increase intraocular eye pressure—and decrease blood flow to the brain.

The researchers describe wearing a tie as a “socially desirable [form of] strangulation.”

To judge the ramifications of wearing a cravat, the study—due to be published in the journal, Neuroradiology, in August and covered by Business Insider on July 16—involved asking 15 men to wear ties, and 15 men to serve as a “control group” and go without them. The researchers then scanned the participants using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure cerebral blood flow and jugular venous flow.

What they discovered was that the brains of the tie-wearers were, on average, receiving 7.5% less “cerebral blood flow” than the brains of those subjects within the control group.The scientists attributed the lower blood flow to the narrowing of the carotid arteries, which carry blood away from the heart, under the pressure of the tie.

While a 7.5% reduction in blood flow may not appear substantial enough to cause noticeable health problems, people who already suffer with other health issues should be cautious: Whether you have high blood pressure, are elderly, or smoke cigarettes, you could end up suffering from headaches, dizziness, and nausea if you wear a tie for too long.

The restricted blood flow also can cause a backup of blood along the system to the eye—thus, raising eye pressure. Raised intraocular eye pressure is considered a risk factor for glaucoma and cataracts, and could possibly increase the risk of worsening existing glaucoma, according to the study.

What’s more, wearing a tie in a doctor’s office, hospital, or clinic could put others at potentially lethal risk, Businesss Insider reports. A study conducted by Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine showed that among 42 male surgical clinicians, nearly half had infection-causing pathogens on their ties.

“Researchers Eyal Zimlichman, Daniel Henderson, and Orly Tamir told Business Insider, “We estimated there are approximately 440,000 of these infections annually among U.S. adult in-patients and that their annual costs are $9.8 billion.”

That’s bad news for haberdashers, but potentially breakthrough information for the healthcare industry.

Research contact: r.lueddecke1992@googlemail.com

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *