Postpartum support: It takes a village—or a ‘rubber corset’

May 31, 2019

Recently, a photo surfaced on Jessica Simpson’s Instagram page of the singer—who gave birth to her third child, daughter Birdie May Johnson, a little less than two months ago—relying on a novel “support system,” as she starts to get back into shape.

In the post, Women’s Health reports, Jessica shares a picture of herself hitting the street to exercise wearing black leggings, a black top, and something else that’s apparently not visible onscreen: a corset.

 “Just stretching it out in my rubber corset,” Jess captions the photo, adding, “The joys of postpartum.”

In my what? This looks like something we would read about on Goop!

The rubber corset to which Jessica refers is most likely a type of postpartum or belly wrap—a product that, for generations, women have worn for support after childbirth, according to What To Expect.

Such wraps not only offer new moms the opportunity to look a little more “streamlined” after the birthing experience, but they also serve a medical purpose: to help support the muscles and abdominal organs postpartum, according to What To Expect.

In fact, a study conducted in 2010 and published in Physiotherapy Canada found that postpartum wrapping could help women walk farther and get back on their feet sooner. Another study, published in the International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, found that some women who wrapped themselves experienced less pain and bleeding after having a C-section.

Postpartum wraps come in all kinds of materials and sizes: As What To Expect notes, they can be made of an elastic material that’s closed with Velcro, or they might be made of latex or other stiff materials, like the one Jess wears in her photo. The amount of compression a wrap provides can vary, too: While some are gentle, others can aggressively cinch the waist, with the purpose of changing its appearance (in Kardashian fashion).

A word to the wise:  Get a thumbs-up from your doctor before wearing any such gear—and to make sure the device is also approved for pregnant women (i.e., not just a standard corset to wear underneath formal wear).

Research contact: @WomensHealthMag

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