Enthusiasm cools among employers for Summer Friday perks

May 29, 2018

Last Friday, many Americans hustled out of the office a little early to get their Memorial Day mojo going. However, while employers likely turned a blind eye to that particular holiday exodus, they won’t be so amenable on many weekends this summer. Based on several surveys, companies are cutting back on Summer Fridays this year, Mic reported on May 24.

New York City Staffing company OfficeTeam found that the number of employers offering the perk had declined precipitously— from 63% in 2012 to just 20% last year.  And that’s a shame, they said, because fully 30% of employees think leaving early for the weekend is the best of all office perks.

According to Gallup, the number of employees who are completely satisfied with their hours is actually trending down. In fact, a 2014 Gallup poll found that the 40-hour work week is no longer even close to operative; most office workers are at their desks for 47 hours a week, if not more.

But those longer hours don’t necessarily lead to greater productivity: A CNBC report in 2015 cited a Stanford University study that showed that “employee output falls after a 50-hour work week—and  sharply falls off a cliff after 55 hours.”

Worse yet, fully 40% of workers already are approaching that cliff, according to Gallup, and 20% of full-time workers log more than 60 hours per week.

Yet, based on a study conducted by the Harvard University School of Public Health, stress-related productivity loss amounts to about $30 billion for employers each year.

As Mic points out, employees are simply counting down the clock on Friday afternoons anyway, so why not let them go?

Of course, summer Fridays aren’t going to be an easy solution for every workforce, Mic writer James Dennin admits.

“But,” says Dennin,”the case is clear that Americans are overworked, office closures are the best way to get workers to take time off—and the best time to close an office is when it’s warm and sunny outside.”

Research contact: jdennin@mic.com

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