Dirty diaper, clean conscience: Get your disposable nappies collected for composting

March 17, 2020

For those parents who value the convenience of disposable diapers—but also care about the environment—now there’s a company that will sell you clean nappies, and collect the dirty ones for recycling and composting.

Instead of throwing thousands of disposable diapers into the landfill every year, where they will take 500 years to biodegrade, parents can just ship their babies’ dirty diapers off in the box-or use a local composter. Then, they can wash their hands of the whole situation, reports the Good News Network.

But first, they’ll need to switch to the biodegradable diapers sold by a company called Dyper—which are ordered online (at $68 per for up to 260 diapers, depending on the size) and shipped free to the buyer.

Founded in 2014 and based out of Scottsdale, Arizona, the privately held company—now operating in the United States, United Kingdom, Germany, France, Spain, and Italy—offers diapers largely constructed of 100% bamboo.

The company has teamed up with New Jersey-based TeraCycle, founded in 2001, which brags that, to date, it has helped over 202 million people in 21 countries to collect and recycle waste.

According to the Good News Network, the unique recycling program aptly called “ReDyper” starts with a subscription, and includes boxes and bags that meet the United Nations Hazmat shipping specifications, as well as prepaid shipping labels to make the whole process as easy as possible.

After they arrive at TerraCycle’s facilities, they go on to industrial composting facilities that TerraCycle partners with to be turned mostly into compost for things like the landscaping on highway median strips.

“We talked to many moms [who] wish that they had that opportunity to compost, because they’re living in New York City in an apartment on the 24th floor and they have no option to do that,” said Taylor Shearer, content manager at Dyper.

Because 3.5 million tons of diapers are tossed into the trash every year, any diaper recycling program is sorely needed—and welcome as a newborn baby.

Reseaarch contact: @goodnewsnetwork

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